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Open Knowledge Festival, 2014

- July 28, 2014 in 2014, Featured, india, OKFest14, Open Access, Open Data, Open Knowledge, open Knowledge Festival, Open Knowledge Foundation, Open Knowledge India, Open Science, open-education

IMG_20140715_195237This year’s Open Knowledge Festival was held from 15-17 July in Berlin, Germany. It was attended by representatives and enthusiasts from 56 countries. The Festival has been the largest of its kind till date and was attended by Google, Omidyar Network, Partnership for Open Data, Open Corporates, Science Open, Open-Steps, Wikirate among others. Among the keynote speakers were Neelie Kroes (Vice President and EU Commissioner for Digital Agenda, European Commission), Patrick Alley (Founder of Global Witness and member of the WEF Global Agenda Council for Conflict prevention), Beatriz Busaniche (Founder of Wikimedia Argentina and key member of Argentina’s Fundacion Via Libre), Ory Okolloh (Co-founder Ushahidi and Mzanlendo, Director of Investments Omidyar Network), Eric Hysen (Head of Politics and Elections, Google), etc. The festival played host to a number of bright new ideas and helped a great deal in consolidating the global stand for opening up information. The UnFestival and several fringe events formed an important part of the Open Knowledge Festival, 2014. In these, people from all over the world showcased their stories and exchanged ideas. The talks revolved around a diverse range of topics, including Open Data, Open Education, Open Glam, Open Science, building up new tools and partnerships, etc. A very efficient team of volunteers worked day and night to make the events a grand success. Open Minds to Open Action had been this years theme at the Festival. Knowledge, tools and society had been the three predominating streams around which all talks and discussions took place. To put broadly, the underlying driving forces had been: Knowledge (that informs change), Tools (that enable change) 10478186_10203463753568222_8758986267975689446_nand Society (that effects change). India’s Role at the global stage: Open Knowledge India played an important role in the event and put forward a number of new ideas. Our mode of action has been finding out the problems that affect us locally, brainstorming with the global community, finding out solutions and finding out ways of implementing the solutions locally. The motto for us had been Thinking Local and Going Global. Among the few new lines of action that we proposed are:
  • Collaborating more with countries to that face problems similar to our country. We agreed to pool our resources and find out solutions to the intersection set of problems that we all face. Pooling our resources and attacking the problems together can help us a great deal in actually affecting positive changes.
  • Building up a common platform for discourse both within the community and outside of it, where the general public can be effectively involved in carrying out the positive changes.
  • Creating partnerships with countries like Bangladesh, Nepal,etc., with whom we share facets of our own culture.
‘Reflecting the diversity of the open movement, by including contributions from different disciplines, countries and cultures…’ had been the key lookout of the organizing team for the event this year. True to this spirit, the Open Knowledge Festival, 2014 did manage to create a melting-pot of ideas and discourse. It managed to create a roadmap for an even brighter future ahead for humanity.          

Open Knowledge Festival, 2014

- July 28, 2014 in 2014, Featured, india, OKFest14, Open Access, Open Data, Open Knowledge, open Knowledge Festival, Open Knowledge Foundation, Open Knowledge India, Open Science, open-education

IMG_20140715_195237This year’s Open Knowledge Festival was held from 15-17 July in Berlin, Germany. It was attended by representatives and enthusiasts from 56 countries. The Festival has been the largest of its kind till date and was attended by Google, Omidyar Network, Partnership for Open Data, Open Corporates, Science Open, Open-Steps, Wikirate among others. Among the keynote speakers were Neelie Kroes (Vice President and EU Commissioner for Digital Agenda, European Commission), Patrick Alley (Founder of Global Witness and member of the WEF Global Agenda Council for Conflict prevention), Beatriz Busaniche (Founder of Wikimedia Argentina and key member of Argentina’s Fundacion Via Libre), Ory Okolloh (Co-founder Ushahidi and Mzanlendo, Director of Investments Omidyar Network), Eric Hysen (Head of Politics and Elections, Google), etc. The festival played host to a number of bright new ideas and helped a great deal in consolidating the global stand for opening up information. The UnFestival and several fringe events formed an important part of the Open Knowledge Festival, 2014. In these, people from all over the world showcased their stories and exchanged ideas. The talks revolved around a diverse range of topics, including Open Data, Open Education, Open Glam, Open Science, building up new tools and partnerships, etc. A very efficient team of volunteers worked day and night to make the events a grand success. Open Minds to Open Action had been this years theme at the Festival. Knowledge, tools and society had been the three predominating streams around which all talks and discussions took place. To put broadly, the underlying driving forces had been: Knowledge (that informs change), Tools (that enable change) 10478186_10203463753568222_8758986267975689446_nand Society (that effects change). India’s Role at the global stage: Open Knowledge India played an important role in the event and put forward a number of new ideas. Our mode of action has been finding out the problems that affect us locally, brainstorming with the global community, finding out solutions and finding out ways of implementing the solutions locally. The motto for us had been Thinking Local and Going Global. Among the few new lines of action that we proposed are:
  • Collaborating more with countries to that face problems similar to our country. We agreed to pool our resources and find out solutions to the intersection set of problems that we all face. Pooling our resources and attacking the problems together can help us a great deal in actually affecting positive changes.
  • Building up a common platform for discourse both within the community and outside of it, where the general public can be effectively involved in carrying out the positive changes.
  • Creating partnerships with countries like Bangladesh, Nepal,etc., with whom we share facets of our own culture.
‘Reflecting the diversity of the open movement, by including contributions from different disciplines, countries and cultures…’ had been the key lookout of the organizing team for the event this year. True to this spirit, the Open Knowledge Festival, 2014 did manage to create a melting-pot of ideas and discourse. It managed to create a roadmap for an even brighter future ahead for humanity.          

Open Knowledge Festival, 2014

- July 28, 2014 in 2014, Featured, india, OKFest14, Open Access, Open Data, Open Knowledge, open Knowledge Festival, Open Knowledge Foundation, Open Knowledge India, Open Science, open-education

IMG_20140715_195237This year’s Open Knowledge Festival was held from 15-17 July in Berlin, Germany. It was attended by representatives and enthusiasts from 56 countries. The Festival has been the largest of its kind till date and was attended by Google, Omidyar Network, Partnership for Open Data, Open Corporates, Science Open, Open-Steps, Wikirate among others. Among the keynote speakers were Neelie Kroes (Vice President and EU Commissioner for Digital Agenda, European Commission), Patrick Alley (Founder of Global Witness and member of the WEF Global Agenda Council for Conflict prevention), Beatriz Busaniche (Founder of Wikimedia Argentina and key member of Argentina’s Fundacion Via Libre), Ory Okolloh (Co-founder Ushahidi and Mzanlendo, Director of Investments Omidyar Network), Eric Hysen (Head of Politics and Elections, Google), etc. The festival played host to a number of bright new ideas and helped a great deal in consolidating the global stand for opening up information. The UnFestival and several fringe events formed an important part of the Open Knowledge Festival, 2014. In these, people from all over the world showcased their stories and exchanged ideas. The talks revolved around a diverse range of topics, including Open Data, Open Education, Open Glam, Open Science, building up new tools and partnerships, etc. A very efficient team of volunteers worked day and night to make the events a grand success. Open Minds to Open Action had been this years theme at the Festival. Knowledge, tools and society had been the three predominating streams around which all talks and discussions took place. To put broadly, the underlying driving forces had been: Knowledge (that informs change), Tools (that enable change) 10478186_10203463753568222_8758986267975689446_nand Society (that effects change). India’s Role at the global stage: Open Knowledge India played an important role in the event and put forward a number of new ideas. Our mode of action has been finding out the problems that affect us locally, brainstorming with the global community, finding out solutions and finding out ways of implementing the solutions locally. The motto for us had been Thinking Local and Going Global. Among the few new lines of action that we proposed are:
  • Collaborating more with countries to that face problems similar to our country. We agreed to pool our resources and find out solutions to the intersection set of problems that we all face. Pooling our resources and attacking the problems together can help us a great deal in actually affecting positive changes.
  • Building up a common platform for discourse both within the community and outside of it, where the general public can be effectively involved in carrying out the positive changes.
  • Creating partnerships with countries like Bangladesh, Nepal,etc., with whom we share facets of our own culture.
‘Reflecting the diversity of the open movement, by including contributions from different disciplines, countries and cultures…’ had been the key lookout of the organizing team for the event this year. True to this spirit, the Open Knowledge Festival, 2014 did manage to create a melting-pot of ideas and discourse. It managed to create a roadmap for an even brighter future ahead for humanity.          

Open Knowledge Festival, 2014

- July 28, 2014 in 2014, Featured, india, OKFest14, Open Access, Open Data, Open Knowledge, open Knowledge Festival, Open Knowledge Foundation, Open Knowledge India, Open Science, open-education

IMG_20140715_195237This year’s Open Knowledge Festival was held from 15-17 July in Berlin, Germany. It was attended by representatives and enthusiasts from 56 countries. The Festival has been the largest of its kind till date and was attended by Google, Omidyar Network, Partnership for Open Data, Open Corporates, Science Open, Open-Steps, Wikirate among others. Among the keynote speakers were Neelie Kroes (Vice President and EU Commissioner for Digital Agenda, European Commission), Patrick Alley (Founder of Global Witness and member of the WEF Global Agenda Council for Conflict prevention), Beatriz Busaniche (Founder of Wikimedia Argentina and key member of Argentina’s Fundacion Via Libre), Ory Okolloh (Co-founder Ushahidi and Mzanlendo, Director of Investments Omidyar Network), Eric Hysen (Head of Politics and Elections, Google), etc. The festival played host to a number of bright new ideas and helped a great deal in consolidating the global stand for opening up information. The UnFestival and several fringe events formed an important part of the Open Knowledge Festival, 2014. In these, people from all over the world showcased their stories and exchanged ideas. The talks revolved around a diverse range of topics, including Open Data, Open Education, Open Glam, Open Science, building up new tools and partnerships, etc. A very efficient team of volunteers worked day and night to make the events a grand success. Open Minds to Open Action had been this years theme at the Festival. Knowledge, tools and society had been the three predominating streams around which all talks and discussions took place. To put broadly, the underlying driving forces had been: Knowledge (that informs change), Tools (that enable change) 10478186_10203463753568222_8758986267975689446_nand Society (that effects change). India’s Role at the global stage: Open Knowledge India played an important role in the event and put forward a number of new ideas. Our mode of action has been finding out the problems that affect us locally, brainstorming with the global community, finding out solutions and finding out ways of implementing the solutions locally. The motto for us had been Thinking Local and Going Global. Among the few new lines of action that we proposed are:
  • Collaborating more with countries to that face problems similar to our country. We agreed to pool our resources and find out solutions to the intersection set of problems that we all face. Pooling our resources and attacking the problems together can help us a great deal in actually affecting positive changes.
  • Building up a common platform for discourse both within the community and outside of it, where the general public can be effectively involved in carrying out the positive changes.
  • Creating partnerships with countries like Bangladesh, Nepal,etc., with whom we share facets of our own culture.
‘Reflecting the diversity of the open movement, by including contributions from different disciplines, countries and cultures…’ had been the key lookout of the organizing team for the event this year. True to this spirit, the Open Knowledge Festival, 2014 did manage to create a melting-pot of ideas and discourse. It managed to create a roadmap for an even brighter future ahead for humanity.          

OKFestival 2014: Berliner Sommerluft und offenes Wissen

- July 25, 2014 in Featured, OKFest14, OKFestival

OKFestival-2014

Photo by Marieke Guy under CC BY 2.0

Vom 15. bis 17. Juli 2014 fand auf dem Gelände der Berliner Kulturbrauerei das diesjährige OKFestival 2014 statt. Dabei machte nicht nur das gute Wetter das etwas andere Festival zu einer großartigen Veranstaltung. Über drei Tage trafen an jeder Ecke der ehemaligen Brauerei kleine Gruppen zusammen, um fleißig Ideen und Visionen zu offenem Wissen zu diskutieren oder gleich vor Ort in die Tat umzusetzen. Von Graffiti-Wänden zu “linked Budgets”, von der Zerstörung von Druckern bis hin zu einem sozialen Vertrag für offene Daten – viele Veranstaltungen, Workshops und Keynotes zu allen Themen rund um Offenheit konnten hier besucht werden. Einziges Problem: Man konnte leider nicht an fünf Orten gleichzeitig sein! Was war: Viel Austausch, großartige Keynotes & Workshops, Launchevent Code for Germany, Kickoff Open Glam & Open Science AGs uvm. Um trotz der Kürze des OKFestivals von nur knapp drei Tagen möglichst viel Austausch zu haben, gab es in diesem Jahr eine ganze Reihe von Zusatzveranstaltungen vor und nach dem eigentlichen Event. Beispielsweise wurden die Arbeitsgruppen Open Science (Mailingliste) und OpenGLAM (Mailingliste) in Deutschland gegründet – wer mitmachen will, kann sich via Mailingliste melden. Schon am Montagabend, kurz vor dem offiziellen Start des OKFestivals 2014, fand der Launch von Code for Germany in der Kulturbrauerei statt. Gemeinsam mit Partnern und Unterstützern aus aller Welt wurde das Programm der anwesenden Presse, Politik und Community vorgestellt. Am Dienstagabend begann dann der offizielle Teil des OKFestivals. Erstaunliche Menschen aus der ganzen Welt wurden zu den School of Data Fellows ernannt, die mit der Zivilgesellschaft und Journalisten in ihren Regionen arbeiten werden, um die Vorteile von offenen Daten in die Realität zu bringen. Ebenfalls am Dienstag trafen sich Wissenschaftlerinnen und Aktivisten ausLändern wie Indonesien, Indien, Brasilien, Nigeria, Kenya, um ihre Forschungsprojekte zur Wirkung von offenem Wissen vorzustellen und zu diskutieren. Am Mittwoch hörten wir inspirierende Keynotes von Patrick Alley, Gründer der NGO Global Witness, der eindrucksvoll von der Notwendigkeit berichtete Finanztransaktionsdaten zu veröffentlichen, um Korruption weltweit aufzudecken. Diese Keynote stand stellvertretend für eines der großen Themen des OKFestivals, das in einer Vielzahl von Sessions („Power, politics, inclusion and voice“ oder „Can open data go wrong?“) ausgiebig diskutiert wurde: Relevanz und Wirkung von Offenem Wissen.
OKFestival-2014-3

Photo by Marieke Guy under CC BY 2.0

Der Donnerstag begann mit einer Keynote von Neelie Kroes, bis November noch Vize Präsidentin der Europäischen Kommission, über die Bemühungen der EU für die Öffnung von Wissen und Verwaltungsdaten. Im Anschluss demonstrierte Eric Hysen von Google (einer der Hauptsponsoren des OKFestivals) in seiner Keynote u.a. die Möglichkeiten von Open Data. Er gab ausserdem einen Überblick über den Stand der Offenheit von Datan weltweit und forderte mit “Open is not enough, data should also be structured, licensed and updated” dazu auf, nicht nur Daten zu veröffentlichen, sondern auch die Nachnutzung zu ermöglichen und zu fördern. In weiteren Workshops am Nachmittag wurde zusammen an den Themen Überwachung, Open Design, Story finding & story-telling und vielem mehr gemeinsam gearbeitet. Wie schon auf früheren “Open” Veranstaltungen wurde auch auf dem OKFestival 2014 wieder deutlich, dass Offenheit und Open Data kein Luxus der reichen Länder ist, sondern schon heute konkret zu Verbesserung von Politik und Gesellschaft in ganz unterschiedlichen Ländern beiträgt. Auch die Keynotes von Beatriz Busaniche, Gründerin der Wikimedia Argentinien und von der genialen Ory Okolloh, Aktivistin, Rechtsanwälting und Bloggerin aus Kenia zeigten deutlich, dass Open Data weltweit relevant ist. In den vielen Workshops während des OKFestivals hatten die Teilnehmer dann die Gelegenheit, von einander zu lernen und nach neuen Wegen zu suchen, damit offenes Wissen tatsächlich zu Veränderungen für die Bürger führt. Der diesjährige Fokus auf besonders partizipative Veranstaltungsformate förderte diesen Austausch. Das OKFestival war aber auch von Innehalten und Nachdenken über die eigene Vorgehensweise geprägt. In vielen Gesprächen wurde über die starke Rolle und partikularen Interessen der beteiligten Firmen und Sponsoren debattiert. Dennoch hielt das die vielen Teilnehmer nicht davon ab, auf dem OKFestival auch die Herausforderungen um die teils mangelhafte Verfügbarkeit von Offenem Wissen gleich aktiv anzugehen: In Flashhacks, z.B. vom Projekt OpenCorporates, ein Register für offene Unternehmensdaten, wurde durch konkrete Aktionen während des Festivals Daten und Informationen geöffnet. Was wird: Die Debatte um den Erfolg von Open Knowledge, Kritik an Offenheit und noch mehr Austausch
OKFestival-2014-2

Photo by Marieke Guy under CC BY 2.0

Das Open Knowledge Festival 2014 bot mit Bereichen wie offenes Design, offene Entwicklungshilfe, offene Hardware und offene Wissenschaften u.a. (insgesamt 16 Bereiche) eine große Themenbreite, in denen es Bestrebungen gibt, offenes Wissen zu teilen. Mehr Themen und Köpfe, das bedeutet jedoch auch, dass mehr unterschiedliche Interessen und Meinungen auf eine Linie zu bringen sind. Dass dies in den kommenden Jahren gelingt, ist für den weiteren Erfolg der Open Knowledge-Bewegung von großer Bedeutung. Denn ihre potenziellen Gegenspieler, die aus so unterschiedlichen Ecken wie Wissenschaft, Politik und Wirtschaft kommen können, verfügen erfahrungsgemäß über die größeren Ressourcen und vor allem andere Intentionen. Schon auf dem nächste Open Knowledge Festival 2015 könnte sich entscheiden, ob die Bewegung den eigenen kurzfristigen Erfolg auch langfristig meistern und weiterhin gestalten kann. Dazu muss Sie sich auch noch stärker und umfassender mit der Kritik an Openness in den unterschiedlichsten Bereichen befassen und diese selber mitgestalten. Alle Veranstaltungen, Workshops und Keynotes gibt es auch in der Zusammenfassung auf dem Blog des OKFestivals 2014.

Open Knowledge Festival 2014: From Apps to Ecosystems

- July 23, 2014 in Events, OK Festival, OK Festival 2014, OKFest14, Open Knowledge, open Knowledge Festival, Open Knowledge Ireland

The OKFestival in Berlin raised a series of important points:
  • The transition from building apps to building ecosystems
  • Creative Commons Licensing
  • Open for whom?
  • Building open networks
  • What happens after the party?
  Last week I attended OKFestival in Berlin thanks to the kind sponsorship from BaleFire Global. (This was my second Open Knowledge event as I attended OKCon in Geneva last year.) This year the Festival brought together over 1,000 advocates, activists and citizens from more than 60 countries. Participants were encouraged to work together to build tools and partnerships that will harness the power of openness as a positive force for change. It is exciting to witness how the Open Knowledge movement is maturing -we are becoming more pragmatic through experience and practice. As a group, we have come to realise that to make progress we need to evolve from holding sporadic events and building killer apps …. to focusing on the bigger picture, creating open alliances and developing a self-sustaining ecosystem for open data to make difference in the lives of real people.  

Becoming Data Literate

The Open Knowledge foundation has often referred to open data as the public library of the 21st century. We need this library to help people become data literate, and likewise need to help people become digitally literate to use this library. We need to help people to develop digital skills which are essential for the 21st century through a parallel process of open education. It’s clear that as citizens in a rapidly evolving and increasingly data driven society, we lack access to the skills, tools, time and the energy to make the most of increasingly available data.  

Open for Whom?

The conversation on surveillance which was initiated at the OGP meeting in London (Oct 2013) continued at OK Fest. This raised a crucial question for many participants: Open for whom? It’s clear that as private citizens we have very little  privacy and that ‘public’ bodies and ‘public’ servants are not public. To have a chance to restore balance we need to equip ourselves with the skills and tools to protect ourselves and our private identity and to put in place checks and balances on information collected on us by governments and corporations. As a particular tool, the web gives us a space; it allows us to express our concerns, desires, opinions and to make our voices heard. As a community, we need to learn how to better translate our online efforts into institutional change. We need to learn to lobby and we need to know how to negotiate. In many of our efforts,we are naive. To become active citizens, we need to learn from the past, participate in present developments and connect with other movements.  

Building Open Coalitions

One of the more compelling realisations that emerged from the fruitful discussions in Berlin, was that not only do we need to find more effective ways of working together, we need to learn how to build open coalitions with groups and initiatives with similar goals. The highlight of the festival was a keynote delivered by Vice-President of the European Commission and Commissioner for the Digital Agenda Neelie Kroes. She credited Open Knowledge catalysing the movement globally (video starts at 22min 35sec). Later that same day and in harmony with Commissioner Kroes’ message,  the European Commission issued recommendations for encouraging public sector information re-use under Creative Common Licenses. image02 We need to build ecosystems (not apps)…. We need governments, funders, civil society and developers to work together. Although we do not always share the same agenda, we do share many values, goals and objectives – by identifying these and making them transparent we can find common ground for collective action. 20140715_154718  

And so…What happens after the party?

OKFest 2014 Storified: HERE