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The Open Data Charter Measurement Guide is out now!

- May 21, 2018 in Open Data measurements, research

This post was jointly written by Ana Brandusescu (Web Foundation) and Danny Lämmerhirt (Open Knowledge International), co-chairs of the Measurement and Accountability Working Group of the Open Data Charter. It was originally published via the Open Data Charter’s Medium account.     We are pleased to announce the launch of our Open Data Charter Measurement Guide. The guide is a collaborative effort of the Charter’s Measurement and Accountability Working Group (MAWG). It analyses the Open Data Charter principles and how they are assessed based on current open government data measurement tools. Governments, civil society, journalists, and researchers may use it to better understand how they can measure open data activities according to the Charter principles.

What can I find in the Measurement Guide?

  • An executive summary for people who want to quickly understand what measurement tools exist and for what principles.
  • An analysis of how each Charter principle is measured, including a comparison of indicators that are currently used to measure each Charter principle and its commitments. This analysis is based on the open data indicators used by the five largest measurement tools – the Web Foundation’s  Open Data Barometer, Open Knowledge International’s Global Open Data Index, Open Data Watch’s Open Data Inventory, OECD’s OURdata Index, and the European Open Data Maturity Assessment . For each principle, we also highlight case studies of how Charter adopters have practically implemented the commitments of that principle.
  • Comprehensive indicator tables show how each Charter principle commitment can be measured. This table is especially helpful when used to compare how different indices approach the same commitment, and where gaps exist. Here, you can see an example of the indicator tables for Principle 1.
  • A methodology section that details how the Working Group conducted the analysis of mapping existing measurements indices against Charter commitments.
  • A recommended list of resources for anyone that wants to read more about measurement and policy.
The Measurement Guide is available online in the form of a Gitbook and in a printable PDF version. If you are interested in using the indicators to measure open data, visit our indicator tables for each principle, or find the guide’s raw data here. Do you have comments or questions? Share your feedback with the community using the hashtag #OpenDataMetrics or get in touch with our working group at progressmeasurement-wg@opendatacharter.net.

The Open Data Charter Measurement Guide is out now!

- May 21, 2018 in Open Data measurements, research

This post was jointly written by Ana Brandusescu (Web Foundation) and Danny Lämmerhirt (Open Knowledge International), co-chairs of the Measurement and Accountability Working Group of the Open Data Charter. It was originally published via the Open Data Charter’s Medium account.     We are pleased to announce the launch of our Open Data Charter Measurement Guide. The guide is a collaborative effort of the Charter’s Measurement and Accountability Working Group (MAWG). It analyses the Open Data Charter principles and how they are assessed based on current open government data measurement tools. Governments, civil society, journalists, and researchers may use it to better understand how they can measure open data activities according to the Charter principles.

What can I find in the Measurement Guide?

  • An executive summary for people who want to quickly understand what measurement tools exist and for what principles.
  • An analysis of how each Charter principle is measured, including a comparison of indicators that are currently used to measure each Charter principle and its commitments. This analysis is based on the open data indicators used by the five largest measurement tools – the Web Foundation’s  Open Data Barometer, Open Knowledge International’s Global Open Data Index, Open Data Watch’s Open Data Inventory, OECD’s OURdata Index, and the European Open Data Maturity Assessment . For each principle, we also highlight case studies of how Charter adopters have practically implemented the commitments of that principle.
  • Comprehensive indicator tables show how each Charter principle commitment can be measured. This table is especially helpful when used to compare how different indices approach the same commitment, and where gaps exist. Here, you can see an example of the indicator tables for Principle 1.
  • A methodology section that details how the Working Group conducted the analysis of mapping existing measurements indices against Charter commitments.
  • A recommended list of resources for anyone that wants to read more about measurement and policy.
The Measurement Guide is available online in the form of a Gitbook and in a printable PDF version. If you are interested in using the indicators to measure open data, visit our indicator tables for each principle, or find the guide’s raw data here. Do you have comments or questions? Share your feedback with the community using the hashtag #OpenDataMetrics or get in touch with our working group at progressmeasurement-wg@opendatacharter.net.

The Open Data Charter’s Measurement Guide is now open for consultation!

- March 13, 2018 in Open Data, Open Data Charter, Open Data measurements, research

This blogpost is co-authored by  Ana Brandusescu  and Danny Lämmerhirt, co-chairs of the Measurement and Accountability Working Group of the Open Data Charter.

The Measurement and Accountability Working Group (MAWG) is launching the public consultation phase for the draft Open Data Charter Measurement* Guide!

Image: Imgflig.com

Measurement tools are often described in technical language. The Guide explains how the Open Data Charter principles can be measured. It provides a comprehensive overview of existing open data measurement tools and their indicators, which assess the state of open government data at a national level. Many of the indicators analysed are relevant for local and regional governments, too. This post explains what the Measurement Guide covers; the purpose of the public consultation, and how you can participate!

What can I find in the Measurement Guide?

  • An executive summary for people who want to quickly understand what measurement tools exist and for what principles.
  • An analysis of measuring the Charter principles, which includes a comparison of the indicators that are currently used to measure each Charter principle and its accompanying commitments. It reveals how the measurement tools — Open Data Barometer, Global Open Data Index, Open Data Inventory, OECD’s OURdata Index, European Open Data Maturity Assessment — address the Charter commitments. For each principle, case studies of how Charter adopters have put commitments into practice are also highlighted.
  • Comprehensive indicator tables show available indicators against each Charter commitment. This table is especially helpful when used to compare how different indices approach the same commitment, and where gaps exist.
  • A methodology section that details how the Working Group conducted the analysis of mapping existing measurements indices against Charter commitments.
  • A recommended list of resources for anyone that wants to read more about measurement and policy.

We want you — to give us your feedback!

The public consultation is a dialogue between measurement researchers and everyone who is working with measurements — including government, civil society, and researchers. If you consider yourself as part of one (or more) of these groups, we would appreciate your feedback on the guide. Please bear the questions below in mind as you review the Guide:

  • Is the Measurement Guide clear and understandable?
  • Government: Which indicators are most useful to assess your work on open data and why?
  • Civil society: In what ways do you find existing indicators useful to hold your government to account?
  • Researchers: Do you know measurements and assessments that are well-suited to understand the Charter commitments?

How does the public consultation process work?

The public consultation phase will be open for two weeks — from 12 to 26 March — and includes:

  1. Public feedback, where we gather comments in the Measurement Guide, the indicator tables document.
  2. Public (and private) responses from MAWG members throughout the consultation phase.

How can I give feedback to the public consultation?

  1. You can leave comments directly in the Measurement Guide, as well as the indicator tables.
  2. If you want to send a private message to the group chairs, drop Ana and Danny an email at ana.brandusescu@webfoundation.org and danny.lammerhirt@okfn.org. Or send us a tweet at @anabmap and @danlammerhirt.
  3. Share your feedback with the community using the hashtag #OpenDataMetrics.

We will incorporate your feedback in the Measurement Guide, during the public consultation period. We plan to publish a final version of the Measurement Guide guide by end of April 2018.

A note that we will not include new indicators or comments specifically on the Charter principles. If you have comments about improving the Charter principles, we encourage you to participate in the updating process of the Charter principles.

*Since the last time we wrote a blog post, we have changed the name to more accurately represent the document, from Assessment Guide to Measurement Guide.

The Open Data Charter’s Measurement Guide is now open for consultation!

- March 13, 2018 in Open Data, Open Data Charter, Open Data measurements, research

This blogpost is co-authored by  Ana Brandusescu  and Danny Lämmerhirt, co-chairs of the Measurement and Accountability Working Group of the Open Data Charter.

The Measurement and Accountability Working Group (MAWG) is launching the public consultation phase for the draft Open Data Charter Measurement* Guide!

Image: Imgflig.com

Measurement tools are often described in technical language. The Guide explains how the Open Data Charter principles can be measured. It provides a comprehensive overview of existing open data measurement tools and their indicators, which assess the state of open government data at a national level. Many of the indicators analysed are relevant for local and regional governments, too. This post explains what the Measurement Guide covers; the purpose of the public consultation, and how you can participate!

What can I find in the Measurement Guide?

  • An executive summary for people who want to quickly understand what measurement tools exist and for what principles.
  • An analysis of measuring the Charter principles, which includes a comparison of the indicators that are currently used to measure each Charter principle and its accompanying commitments. It reveals how the measurement tools — Open Data Barometer, Global Open Data Index, Open Data Inventory, OECD’s OURdata Index, European Open Data Maturity Assessment — address the Charter commitments. For each principle, case studies of how Charter adopters have put commitments into practice are also highlighted.
  • Comprehensive indicator tables show available indicators against each Charter commitment. This table is especially helpful when used to compare how different indices approach the same commitment, and where gaps exist.
  • A methodology section that details how the Working Group conducted the analysis of mapping existing measurements indices against Charter commitments.
  • A recommended list of resources for anyone that wants to read more about measurement and policy.

We want you — to give us your feedback!

The public consultation is a dialogue between measurement researchers and everyone who is working with measurements — including government, civil society, and researchers. If you consider yourself as part of one (or more) of these groups, we would appreciate your feedback on the guide. Please bear the questions below in mind as you review the Guide:

  • Is the Measurement Guide clear and understandable?
  • Government: Which indicators are most useful to assess your work on open data and why?
  • Civil society: In what ways do you find existing indicators useful to hold your government to account?
  • Researchers: Do you know measurements and assessments that are well-suited to understand the Charter commitments?

How does the public consultation process work?

The public consultation phase will be open for two weeks — from 12 to 26 March — and includes:

  1. Public feedback, where we gather comments in the Measurement Guide, the indicator tables document.
  2. Public (and private) responses from MAWG members throughout the consultation phase.

How can I give feedback to the public consultation?

  1. You can leave comments directly in the Measurement Guide, as well as the indicator tables.
  2. If you want to send a private message to the group chairs, drop Ana and Danny an email at ana.brandusescu@webfoundation.org and danny.lammerhirt@okfn.org. Or send us a tweet at @anabmap and @danlammerhirt.
  3. Share your feedback with the community using the hashtag #OpenDataMetrics.

We will incorporate your feedback in the Measurement Guide, during the public consultation period. We plan to publish a final version of the Measurement Guide guide by end of April 2018.

A note that we will not include new indicators or comments specifically on the Charter principles. If you have comments about improving the Charter principles, we encourage you to participate in the updating process of the Charter principles.

*Since the last time we wrote a blog post, we have changed the name to more accurately represent the document, from Assessment Guide to Measurement Guide.

The Global Open Data Index as a national indicator – So why do we have Northern Ireland?

- May 9, 2017 in Global Open Data Index, Open Data Index, Open Data measurements, Open Knowledge

In May 2nd, 2017 we launched the Global Open Data Index (GODI). This blog post is part of a series that explore the main findings of GODI and the next challenges in open data measurement.   In the past, we were asked why the Global Open Data Index assesses ‘places’ and not countries. Why do we evaluate Hong Kong? Why the Crown Dependencies Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey? And why do we regard Northern Ireland separately from Great Britain in this year’s edition? To clarify our rationale, we first have to explain which data we are looking at. The Global Open Data Index assesses the publication of open data at the highest administrative level in a country. This can take three forms:
  • The data describes national government processes or procedures ( government bodies operating at the highest administrative level)
  • The data is collected or produced by national government or a national government agency
  • The data describes national parameters and public services for the entire national territory but is collected by sub-national agencies.
The Global Open Data Index looks at very different government data: from national budgets to water and air quality information. We acknowledge that not all countries have the same political structure. Data assessed through the index might not necessarily be produced by national government due to the devolution of power. Furthermore, it is possible that not all sub-national governments provide the same data as they are potentially subject to different laws and/or procedures. So why do we look at ‘places’ instead of countries?  The Index wants to be a meaningful and actionable indicator for government by assessing those government bodies that are responsible for data publication. We regard territories with legislative, executive, and administrative autonomy separately, including the Crown Dependencies (Isle of Man, Jersey, Guernsey) and Hong Kong. We keep the option open to include regions with a disputed status that are not officially recognised as independent countries.   Why does the Index include sub-national government this year? As described above, sub-national governments may act autonomously from the national government and collect/produce data individually. This has always been a challenge for the Index – sometimes open data was provided in one region but not in another. How to adequately assess these gaps? This year we experiment how more systematically measure data on a sub-national level in a comparable way. As a test case, we considered Northern Ireland separately from Great Britain. By doing so, we investigate how the responsibilities of open data publication are distributed across government. Thus we open up the debate how to understand open data on a subnational level. This experiment is part of a larger research effort to understand open data governance models (see our call for research). We did ask both of Northern Ireland and the UK government to comment on this decision, but due to the Purdah (Pre-elections period), we were unable to get a comment.