You are browsing the archive for Open Data.

AbreLatam / Condatos: after the first 5 years

Oscar Montiel - October 12, 2017 in abrelatam, condatos, Events, Latin America, Open Data

This is a somewhat belated entry about the Abrelatam and Condatos, the regional open data conference of Latin America. It comes more than a month after the conference took place in San José, Costa Rica, but the questions raised there are still relevant and super important for advancing open data in Latin America and working towards truly open states. After five years, the discussions have shifted. We don’t only talk about open data and how to make it happen but about, for example: privacy and how we can make sure our governments will guarantee this the right to privacy in open data work; data standards and how to make them interoperable; and business models and how to be a sustainable organization that can last beyond project funding. These discussions are crucial in the current context in Latin America, with cases of corruption like Lava Jato or #GobiernoEspía in Mexico. They are particularly important if we want open data to not only be a bunch of good intentions, but rather infrastructure that is there for and because of citizens. Still, we have a big challenge ahead. As it was often commented in various sessions, we need to systematize all the knowledge we have gathered in these 5 years. We also need to be able to share it with the newcomers and open it up to organizations that aren’t traditionally in the open data sphere. This will help us avoid the echo chamber and keep the work focused on important matters and make open data a valuable asset in the construction of open states. At the same time, we need to learn from our mistakes, understand what has worked and what hasn’t, continue improving the work, not only go to conferences and speak about the amazing work we do, but also talk about where we make mistakes and help other avoid them. This won’t be an easy task, but I think we have the right ingredients to make it happen: we have a mature community that is eager to share its experiences and learnings. We’re ready to take on the next five years and construct an open region.  

Re-publica Thessaloniki: Ενώνοντας την Ευρώπη από το Βορρά έως το Νότο

Spyridoula Markou - September 17, 2017 in Featured, Featured @en, News, Open Data, re:publica, ανοικτά δεδομένα, δήμος, Εκδηλώσεις, Νέα, φεστιβάλ

Η ιδέα για το πρότζεκτ re:connecting Europe γεννήθηκε το Μάιο του 2017 στο Βερολίνο και το ταξίδι που θα ένωνε το Βορρά με το Νότο έφτασε στο τέλος του μετά την ολοκλήρωση του re:publica Thessaloniki. Οι εκδηλώσεις, που διήρκησαν τρεις ημέρες (11-13 Σεπτεμβρίου), περιελάμβαναν παρουσιάσεις και συζητήσεις με άτομα από τον πολιτικό χώρο, τις επιστήμες […]

Frictionless Data v1.0

Paul Walsh - September 5, 2017 in Frictionless Data, Open Data

  Data Containerisation hits v1.0! Announcing a major milestone in the Frictionless Data initiative. Today, we’re announcing a major milestone in the Frictionless Data initiative with the official v1.0 release of the Frictionless Data specifications, including Table Schema and Data Package, along with a robust set of pre-built tooling in Python, R, Javascript, Java, PHP and Go. Frictionless Data is a collection of lightweight specifications and tooling for effortless collection, sharing, and validation of data. After close to 10 years of iterative work on the specifications themselves, and the last 6 months of fine-tuning v1.0 release candidates, we are delighted to announce the availability of the following: We want to thank our funder, the Sloan Foundation, for making this release possible.

What’s inside

A brief overview of the main specifications follows. Further information is available on the specifications website.
  • Table Schema: Provides a schema for tabular data. Table Schema is well suited for use cases around handling and validating tabular data in plain text formats, and use cases that benefit from a portable, language agnostic schema format.
  • CSV Dialect: Provides a way to declare a dialect for CSV files.
  • Data Resource: Provides metadata for a data source in a consistent and machine-readable manner.
  • Data Package: Provide metadata for a collection of data sources in a consistent and machine-readable manner.
The specifications, and the code libraries that implement them, compose to form building blocks for working with data, as illustrated with the following diagram. This component based approach lends itself well to the type of data processing work we often encounter in working with open data. It has also enabled us to build higher-level applications that specifically target common open data workflows, such as our goodtables library for data validation, and our pipelines library for declarative ETL.

v1.0 work

In iterating towards a v1 of the specifications, we tried to sharpen our focus on the design philosophy of this work, and not be afraid to make significant, breaking changes in the name of increased simplicity and utility. What is the design philosophy behind this work, exactly?
  • Requirements that are driven by simplicity
  • Extensibility and customisation by design
  • Metadata that is human-editable and machine-usable
  • Reuse of existing standard formats for data
  • Language-, technology- and infrastructure-agnostic
In striving for these goals, we removed much ambiguity from the specifications, cut features that were under-defined, removed and reduced various types of optionality in the way things could be specified, and even made some implicit patterns explicit by way of creating two new specifications: Data Resource and Tabular Data Resource. See the specifications website for full information.

Next steps

We are preparing to submit Table Schema, Data Resource, Data Package, Tabular Data Resource and Tabular Data Package as IETF RFCs as soon as possible. Lastly, we’ve recently produced a video to explain our work on Frictionless Data. Here, you can get a high-level overview of the concepts and philosophy behind this work, presented by our President and Co-Founder Rufus Pollock.  

#NRW17, BMI, Wikidata und Termine

Stefan Kasberger - September 4, 2017 in event, hackathon, Offene Wahlen, Open Data, Wahlen, Wikidata, Workshop

Von der #NRW17-Visualisierung, über einem Treffen beim Innenministerium bis hin zu Wikidata – vieles hat sich in den letzten Monaten getan bei Offene Wahlen Österreich.

Wir bekommen Zugang zu den Wahldaten!

Als im Mai die vorgezogene Neuwahl der Nationalratswahl beschlossen wurde, war für uns relativ schnell klar: Wir wollen am Wahltag, dem 15. Oktober 2017, um 17 Uhr Zugang zu den ersten Wahldaten. Erste Idee war, mit den Daten ein bisschen spielen zu können und für Visualisierungen und Analysen zu nutzen. Die Ergebnisse sollten dann allen im Web zugänglich gemacht werden. Doch damit das möglich ist, brauchen wir zuerst die Ergebnisdaten von der Bundeswahlbehörde des Innenministeriums (BMI) am Wahltag. Daher haben wir beim BMI via Email angefragt – und dem Ansuchen wurde direkt und sofort stattgegeben. An dieser Stelle vielen Dank an die Bundeswahlbehörde.

#NRW17-Visualisierung

Somit war der Grundstein gelegt für die “Offene Wahlen Österreich Nationalratswahl 2017 Visualisierung”, kurz #NRW17-Visualisierung. Ziel ist, die Ergebnisse in einem neuen Gewand aufzubereiten und dabei thematische Schwerpunkte zu setzen sowie den Code als Open Source allen zugänglich zu machen. Das Projekt wird für alle sichtbar auf GitHub koordiniert, wo man auch den Code findet. Sämtliche Infos sind im Wiki und die Tasks werden mittels Milestones und Projects koordiniert. Technisch werden die Daten mittels einer Django-App für die aufbereitet und D3js visuell dargestellt. In den letzten sechs Wochen hat sich so schon einiges an Code und Know-How angesammelt. Aktuell beginnen wir mit den ersten Visualisierungen. Der weitere Plan ist, die App bis zur Wahl fertig zu entwickeln und am Wahltag um 17 Uhr unter https://nrw17.offenewahlen.at/ zu Launchen. Versäume den Launch nicht und meld dich beim Newsletter an. Wenn du dich gerne mit Daten, Visualisierungen, Kommunikation und/oder Wahlen beschäftigst, meld dich und mach bei uns mit. Wir sind ein offenes Team an ehrenamtlich tätigen und freuen uns über jede Unterstützung. Aktuell sind wir vor allem auf der Suche nach einer Person, die sich mit Kommunikation auskennt und uns bei der Bewerbung der Events und der #NRW17-Visualisierung hilft.

#NRW17 = Daten + Visualisierung + Party

Die #NRW17 Visualisierung wird am 15. Oktober um 17 Uhr live gehen. Zusammen mit der Nationalratswahl ist das für uns Grund genug eine kleine Party zu veranstalten. Daher laden wir alle Wahl-Nerds, Netzpolitik-Interessierte und Daten-LiebhaberInnen zum gemeinsamen Launch der #NRW17-Visualisierung mitsamt Public-Viewing zur Nationalratswahl ins metalab ein. Dort wird vor dem Launch natürlich auch noch ein bisschen gecodet und der Feinschliff gemacht. Wer sich Infos zum Ablauf einer Wahl, zu Wahldaten oder den Visualisierungen holen möchte, ist hier genau richtig.

Offene Wahlen Hackathon @ metalab by Stefan Kasberger (CC BY 4.0)

Wahl-Daten-Party Ort: metalab, Rathausstraße 6, 1010 Wien
Datum: 15.Oktober 2017, 12 – 22 Uhr
Eintritt frei
Webpage

Erste Forderungen umgesetzt

Wie Eingangs schon erwähnt, erhalten wir vom Innenministerium Zugang zu den Wahlergebnissen. Gemeinsam mit den JournalistInnen von orf.at, standard.at, APA, ATV und einigen mehr wurden wir deswegen am 17. August zu einer Diskussion rund um die Wahldaten ins BMI eingeladen. Konkret wird jenen die Zugang zu den Wahldaten bekommen zum ersten Mal ein maschinenlesbares Format (JSON und CSV) angeboten (Forderung #3) und wir wiesen auf die Wichtigkeit eines guten Datenstandards hin. Die Website des BMI wird via https gesichert werden (Forderung #5), was Manipulationen in der Datenübertragung unmöglich machen soll. Ein weiterer wichtiger Punkt: Laut Robert Stein, Leiter der Wahlabteilung im Innenministerium, gibt es kein Urheberrecht auf Wahldaten, womit implizit auch die Forderungen nach einer offenen Lizenz erfüllt wird (Forderung #1). Weiters wurde auf unser Einwirken hin zugesagt, dass die Ergebnisse bereits am Wahltag auf data.gv.at online gestellt werden sollen, sobald sie fertig ausgezählt sind.
Auf Wahldaten gibt es kein Urheberrecht.
Robert Stein, Leiter Wahldatenabteilung BMI
Doch damit sämtliche Forderungen umgesetzt sind, gibt es noch einiges zu tun. Die nächsten Schritte unsererseits sind:
  1. Vorschlagen eines offenen Datenstandards für die Wahlbehörde (Forderung #2).
  2. Anfragen, ob wir die Ergebnisdaten der #NRW17 über eine Open Data restful-API weitergeben dürfen. Da es ja kein Urheberrecht auf die Daten gibt, sollte dies an sich kein Problem sein. Mit dieser Maßnahme würden wir international eine Best-Practice für offene Wahldaten umsetzen und die Forderungen #1, #2, #3, #4, #5 und #10 erfüllen. Dies kann somit eine ideale Vorlage für weitere Schritte beim BMI sein.
  3. Die erwirkten Fortschritte auf Bundesebene auch auf Bundesländer-Ebene voran treiben.
Hierfür benötigen wir deine Unterstützung. Hilf mit, damit Wahldaten einfach und sofort für alle zugänglich sind. So können wir gemeinsam für Transparenz, demokratische Bildung und Innovation bei Wahlen sorgen.

Wikidata und Wahlen

Eine weitere Aktivität ist, dass wir Daten rund um Wahlen in Wikidata eintragen. Für alle die Wikidata noch nicht kennen: Dies ist eine freie Wissens-Datenbank der Wikimedia Foundation, der Organisation hinter Wikipedia, welche sowohl von Maschinen wie auch Menschen genutzt werden kann. Im Juni diesen Jahres haben Wikimedia Deutschland und Open Knowledge Deutschland zu einem Wikidata Wahldaten Workshop in Ulm eingeladen. Dort trafen sich junge Hacker aus Deutschland (und Stefan Kasberger von Offene Wahlen Österreich) für ein Wochenende um sich mit Wahlen und Wikidata zu beschäftigen und auszutauschen.

Wikidata logo by Planemad (Public Domain)

Beim Workshop ging es vor allem darum, vorhandene Daten in Wikidata zu importieren und sich mit SPARQL (der Abfragesprache für Wikidata) vertraut zu machen – von AnfängerIn bis zum Profi. Und natürlich wurde sich auch viel über Wahlen und Daten an sich ausgetauscht. Stefan hat das Wochenende genutzt um in einem GitHub Repository alle relevanten Informationen rund um österreichische Wahlen zu sammeln und auch ein erstes Import-Skript für die Nationalratsabgeordneten gecodet. Die Idee dahinter ist, Wikidata als die primäre Datenbank für politische Entitäten (in der Datenmodellierung ein eindeutig zu bestimmendes Objekt, z. B. Bundeskanzler Christian Kern) aufzubauen. Jede Politikerin, jeder Politiker soll in Zukunft darin eindeutig abgebildet sein, genauso wie jede Wahl, jede Partei und so weiter. Nun wollen wir auch den ersten Wikidata Wahldaten Workshop in Wien organisieren und die Aktivitäten vorantreiben. Der Workshop richtet sich explizit an Wikidata-AnfängerInnen. Neben der Einführung zu Wikidata und Wahlen wird es aber auch eine Gruppe für Wahl-Nerds geben, also Menschen die sich mit Wahlen und Daten schon öfters beschäftigt haben. Hier denken wir vor allem an DatenjournalistInnen, Politikwissenschafts-StudentInnen und WahlforscherInnen (Wikidata-Vorkenntnisse sind ebenfalls nicht nötig). Wikidata Wahldaten Workshop Ort: Wikimedia Österreich Office, Stolzenthalergasse 7/1, 1080 Wien
Datum: 30. September 2017, 14 – 18 Uhr
Eintritt frei
Webpage Organisiert wird der Workshop von Offene Wahlen Österreich, gemeinsam mit Wikimedia Österreich.

offenewahlen.at in neuem Antlitz

Vor knapp einem Jahr wurde die Offene Wahlen Österreich Website gelauncht. Seitdem hat sich die Website kontinuierlich weiter entwickelt. Vor zwei Wochen wurde dann auch die Homepage komplett neu überarbeitet. Aber am besten ihr seht es euch selber an: http://offenewahlen.at/

Nächste Termine

MyData 2017 -konferenssi luo perustaa reilulle, ihmiskeskeiselle ja sykkivälle datataloudelle

Open Knowledge Finland - August 28, 2017 in Conference, datatalous, estonia, ethics, Events, Featured, finland, gdpr, impact, My Data, mydata, mydata 2016, mydata 2017, mydata alliance, mydata declaration, Open Data, vaikuttavuus, Working Groups

Ke 30.8. Tallinnassa, Tallinn University Conference Centre, Narva Maantee 29 To-pe 31.8.-1.9. Helsingissä, Kulttuuritalo, Sturenkatu 4 Kolmipäiväinen MyData 2017 -konferenssi vauhdittaa siirtymää yrityskeskeisestä henkilökohtaisen datan hallinnasta ja hyödyntämisestä kohti ihmiskeskeistä ja yksilöllistä datan hallintaa. Konferenssissa julkaistaan MyData Declaration, eli ihmiskeskeisen tietojenkäsittelyn teesit, jotka ovat allekirjoitettavissa konferenssin aikana. Yksinkertaistettuna MyData -periaatteet voimaannuttavat kansalaisia/palveluiden käyttäjiä, sillä käyttäjä itse voi esimerkiksi uudelleenkäyttää itsestään kerättyä tietoa tai määritellä, miten tietoa jaetaan esimerkiksi muihin palveluihin, mainostajille, tutkijoille tai muille tiedon hyödyntäjille. MyData tulee paitsi tehostamaan julkisia palveluita, myös tuottamaan aivan uudenlaisia palveluinnovaatioita ja on myös todennäköistä, että käyttäjät itse voivat esimerkiksi myydä tietoja itsestään mainostajille. MyData voimaannuttaa kuluttajakansalaisen.

MyData nivoutuu vahvasti tiedon avoimuuteen – ja on internetin suuria haasteita

World Wide Webin keksijä Sir Tim Berners-Lee on nostanyt henkilötiedon käsittelyn yhdeksi kolmesta suuresta internetin tulevaisuutta määrittäväksi haasteeksi. Siksi henkilötieto onkin ollut tärkeä asia Euroopan digitalisaatioagendalla ja uusi EU:n tietosuoja-asetus (GDPR) astumassa voimaan alle vuoden päästä. Siinä missä tietosuoja-asetus tuo itsessään kansalaisille turvaa ja uusia digitaalisia oikeuksia henkilötietoon liittyen, MyData tavallaan rakentaa tämän päälle, tuomalla lisää oikeuksia, ja määrittelemällä periaatteet ja eräänlaisen arkkitehtuurin sille miten henkilötietoa hallinnoidaan käyttäjän ja palveluiden kesken. Myös henkilötietoon liittyvien palveluiden taloudellinen merkitys on valtava. Henkilötiedot ovat yksi merkittävimmistä tulevaisuuden liiketoimintaa muokkaavista voimista (World Economic Forum, 2013) ja niihin liittyvien palvelujen kokonaismarkkinan on arvioitu kasvavan Euroopassa jopa 1000 miljardiin euroon vuonna 2020 (Boston Consulting Group, 2012). Nokkela lukija kysyy mitä tekemistä MyDatalla on avoimen tiedon ja avoimen datan kanssa. Siinä missä avoin data viittaa kaikkien julkisesti saatavilla oleviin tietovarantoihin, MyDatassa puolestaan yksi olennainen osa on vastaavasti yksilön Kansainvälisen Open Knowledge -järjestön (ent. Open Knowledge Foundation) perustaja Rufus Pollock tiivisti avoimen datan ja MyDatan suhteen viime vuoden konferenssissa. Avoimen datan potentiaaliseksi suoraksi hyödyksi on arvioitu 40 miljardia ja välillisiksi 100 miljardia euroa vuosittain EU -alueella (Vickery, 2011).  Sinänsä arviot ovat suuntaa antavia, mutta kokoluokaltaan henkilötiedon taloudellinen potentiaali on näin arvioituna jopa kymmenkertainen avoimen datan potentiaaliin verrattuna. Teimme Valtioneuvoston selvitys- ja tutkimustoiminnalle (VN TEAS) selvityksen avoimen datan taloudellisista vaikutuksista ja yksi raportin löydöksistä olikin nimenomaan se, että tarvitaan laajempaa datatalouden osaamista ja että arvo syntyy yhdistelmällä erilaisia datalähteitä. Toki on tärkeää muistaa, ettei kyse ole vain taloudellisesta merkityksestä. Yhtä kaikki, avoin data, MyData, tekoäly, big data, data-analytiikka – mm. nämä kulkevat käsi kädessä ja lisäävät toinen toisensa merkitystä ja vaikuttavuutta datataloudessa.

MyData 2017 -konferenssi – kansainvälinen yhteisö luo tulevaisuuden!

Toista kertaa järjestettävä tapahtuma on ainutlaatuinen, sillä se tuo yhteen yritykset, yhteisöt, kansalaisjärjestöt tutkijat ja hallinnon edustajat. Viime vuonna ensimmäistä kertaa järjestetyssä konferenssissa oli 670 henkeä 25 maasta, eli onnistumme mainiosti. Viime vuoden konferenssin merkitystä ei kannata aliarvioida, sillä sen jälkeen MyData-verkostoja on käynnistetty useissa maissa, alunperin Liikenne- ja viestintäministeriölle tehty MyData selvitys on käännetty useille kielille ja julkaistu ympäri maailmaa, ja yli 400 hengen MyData-konferenssi järjestetty Japanissa. Tänä vuonna MyData 2017 -tapahtuma järjestetään 3-päiväisenä (30.8. – 1.9.2017) siten, että ensimmäinen päivä on Tallinnassa (tietyt teemasessiot ja akateeminen osuus), ja kaksi päivää (päätapahtuma) Helsingissä. Odotamme paikalle yli 700 henkeä – mukana on peräti yli 150 puhujaa, ja yli 40 eri sessiota! Olemme pyrkineet pitämään lippujen hinnat maltillisena, että saadaan osallistujia erityyppisistä organisaatioista mukaan. Liput saa ostettua suoraan sivulta:  https://mydata2017.org/registration/ MyData 2017 -konferenssin järjestävät yhteistyössä Open Knowledge Finland, Aalto-yliopisto, Tallinnan yliopisto, ja ranskalainen tutkimusorganisaatio Fing. Konferenssi on yhteisöllisesti tuotettu – mukana on noin 10 palkattua henkilöä, yli 35 vapaaehtoista ja yli 50 ohjelman tuottajaa – ja se on Open Knowledge Finlandin vuoden suurin tapahtuma – tervetuloa mukaan!
Yo. tekstissä mainittuja lähteitä: Rufus Pollock MyData 2016 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4SRUqQO_1CQ MyData Declaration https://mydata.org/declaration/ Three challenges for the web, according to its inventor, The Web Foundation (March 12, 2017) https://webfoundation.org/2017/03/web-turns-28-letter/  Boston Consulting Group. (2012). The Value of Our Digital Identity. Liberty global Policy Series. PDF-dokumentti. Saatavissa: http://www.libertyglobal.com/PDF/public-policy/The-Value-of-Our-Digital-Identity.pdf. Koski, H., Honkanen, M., Luukkonen, J., Pajarinen, M., & Ropponen, T. (2017). Avoimen datan hyödyntäminen ja vaikuttavuus. VNK.  Saatavissa: http://tietokayttoon.fi/julkaisu?pubid=18703 Vickery, G. (2011). Review of Recent Studies on PSI Re-Use and Related Market Developments. PDF-dokumentti. Saatavissa: https://www.nsgic.org/public_resources/Vickery.pdf. World Economic Forum. (2013). Unlocking the Value of Personal Data: From Collection to Usage. PDF-dokumentti. Saatavissa: http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_IT_UnlockingValuePersonalData_CollectionUsage_Report_2013.pdf. The post MyData 2017 -konferenssi luo perustaa reilulle, ihmiskeskeiselle ja sykkivälle datataloudelle appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Data is a Team Sport: Government Priorities and Incentives

Dirk Slater - August 13, 2017 in Ania Calderon, Data Blog, data literacy, Event report, Fabriders, Government, Open Data, research, Tamara Puhovski, Team Sport, The Open Data Charter

Data is a Team Sport is our open-research project exploring the data literacy eco-system and how it is evolving in the wake of post-fact, fake news and data-driven confusion.  We are producing a series of videos, blog posts and podcasts based on a series of online conversations we are having with data literacy practitioners. To subscribe to the podcast series, cut and paste the following link into your podcast manager : http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:311573348/sounds.rss or find us in the iTunes Store and Stitcher. The conversation in this episode focuses on the challenges of getting governments to prioritise data literacy both externally and internally, and incentives to produce open-data and features:
  • Ania Calderon, Executive Director at the Open Data Charter, a collaboration between governments and organisations working to open up data based on a shared set of principles. For the past three years, she led the National Open Data Policy in Mexico, delivering a key presidential mandate. She established capacity building programs across more than 200 public institutions.
  • Tamara Puhovskia sociologist, innovator, public policy junky and an open government consultant. She describes herself as a time traveler journeying back to 19th and 20th century public policy centers and trying to bring them back to the future.

Notes from the conversation:

Access to government produced open-data is critical for healthy functioning democracies. It takes an eco-system that includes a critical thinking citizenry, knowledgeable civil servants, incentivised elected officials, and smart open-data advocates.  Everyone in the eco-system needs to be focused on long-term goals.
  • Elected officials needs incentivising beyond monetary arguments, as budgetary gains can take a long time to fruition.
  • Government’s capacities to produce open-data is an issue that needs greater attention.
  • We need to get past just making arguments for open-data, but be able to provide good solid stories and examples of its benefits.

Resources mentioned in the conversation:

Also, not mentioned, but be sure to check out Tamara’s work on Open Youth

View the full online conversation:

Flattr this!

An approach to building open databases

Paul Walsh - August 10, 2017 in Labs, Open Data

This post has been co-authored by Adam Kariv, Vitor Baptista, and Paul Walsh.
Open Knowledge International (OKI) recently coordinated a two-day work sprint as a way to touch base with partners in the Open Data for Tax Justice project. Our initial writeup of the sprint can be found here. Phase I of the project ended in February 2017 with the publication of What Do They Pay?, a white paper that outlines the need for a public database on the tax contributions and economic activities of multinational companies. The overarching goal of the sprint was to start some work towards such a database, by replicating data collection processes we’ve used in other projects, and to provide a space for domain expert partners to potentially use this data for some exploratory investigative work. We had limited time, a limited budget, and we are pleased with the discussions and ideas that came out of the sprint. One attendee, Tim Davies, criticised the approach we took in the technical stream of the sprint. The problem with the criticism is the extrapolation of one stream of activity during a two-day event to posit an entire approach to a project. We think exploration and prototyping should be part of any healthy project, and that is exactly what we did with our technical work in the two-day sprint. Reflecting on the discussion presents a good opportunity here to look more generally at how we, as an organisation, bring technical capacity to projects such as Open Data for Tax Justice. Of course, we often bring much more than technical capacity to a project, and Open Data for Tax Justice is no different in that regard, being mostly a research project to date. In particular, we’ll take a look at the technical approach we used for the two-day sprint. While this is not the only approach towards technical projects we employ at OKI, it has proven useful on projects driven by the creation of new databases.

An approach

Almost all projects that OKI either leads on, or participates in, have multiple partners. OKI generally participates in one of three capacities (sometimes, all three):
  • Technical design and implementation of open data platforms and apps.
  • Research and thought leadership on openness and data.
  • Dissemination and facilitating participation, often by bringing the “open data community” to interact with domain specific actors.
Only the first capacity is strictly technical, but each capacity does, more often than not, touch on technical issues around open data. Some projects have an important component around the creation of new databases targeting a particular domain. Open Data for Tax Justice is one such project, as are OpenTrials, and the Subsidy Stories project, which itself is a part of OpenSpending. While most projects have partners, usually domain experts, it does not mean that collaboration is consistent or equally distributed over the project life cycle. There are many reasons for this to be the case, such as the strengths and weaknesses of our team and those of our partners, priorities identified in the field, and, of course, project scope and funding. With this as the backdrop for projects we engage in generally, we’ll focus for the rest of this post on aspects when we bring technical capacity to a project. As a team (the Product Team at OKI), we are currently iterating on an approach in such projects, based on the following concepts:
  • Replication and reuse
  • Data provenance and reproducibility
  • Centralise data, decentralise views
  • Data wrangling before data standards
While not applicable to all projects, we’ve found this approach useful when contributing to projects that involve building a database to, ultimately, unlock the potential to use data towards social change.

Replication and reuse

We highly value the replication of processes and the reuse of tooling across projects. Replication and reuse enables us to reduce technical costs, focus more on the domain at hand, and share knowledge on common patterns across open data projects. In terms of technical capacity, the Product Team is becoming quite effective at this, with a strong body of processes and tooling ready for use. This also means that each project enables us to iterate on such processes and tooling, integrating new learnings. Many of these learnings come from interactions with partners and users, and others come from working with data. In the recent Open Data for Tax Justice sprint, we invited various partners to share experiences working in this field and try a prototype we built to extract data from country-by-country reports to a central database. It was developed in about a week, thanks to the reuse of processes and tools from other projects and contexts. When our partners started looking into this database, they had questions that could only be answered by looking back to the original reports. They needed to check the footnotes and other context around the data, which weren’t available in the database yet. We’ve encountered similar use cases in both OpenBudgets.eu and OpenTrials, so we can build upon these experiences to iterate towards a reusable solution for the Open Data for Tax Justice project. By doing this enough times in different contexts, we’re able to solve common issues quickly, freeing more time to focus on the unique challenges each project brings.

Data provenance and reproducibility

We think that data provenance, and reproducibility of views on data, is absolutely essential to building databases with a long and useful future. What exactly is data provenance? A useful definition from wikipedia is “… (d)ata provenance documents the inputs, entities, systems, and processes that influence data of interest, in effect providing a historical record of the data and its origins”. Depending on the way provenance is implemented in a project, it can also be a powerful tool for reproducibility of the data. Most work around open data at present does not consider data provenance and reproducibility as an essential aspect of working with open data. We think this is to the detriment of the ecosystem’s broader goals of seeing open data drive social change: the credible use of data from projects with no provenance or reproducibility built in to the creation of databases is significantly diminished in our “post truth” era. Our current approach builds data provenance and reproducibility right into the heart of building a database. There is a clear, documented record of every action performed on data, from the extraction of source data, through to normalisation processes, and right to the creation of records in a database. The connection between source data and processed data is not lost, and, importantly, the entire data pipeline can be reproduced by others. We acknowledge that a clear constraint of this approach, in its current form, is that it is necessarily more technical than, say, ad hoc extraction and manipulation with spreadsheets and other consumer tools used in manual data extraction processes. However, as such approaches make data provenance and reproducibility harder because there is no history of the changes made or where the data comes from, we are willing to accept this more technical approach and iterate on ways to reduce technical barriers. We hope to see more actors in the open data ecosystem integrating provenance and reproducibility right into their data work. Without doing so, we greatly reduce the ability for open data to be used in an investigative capacity, and likewise, we diminish the possibility of using the outputs of open data projects in the wider establishment of facts about the world. Recent work on beneficial ownership data takes a step in this direction, leveraging the PROV-DM standard to declare data provenance facts.

Centralise data, decentralise views

In OpenSpending, OpenTrials, and our initial exploratory work on Open Data for Tax Justice, there is an overarching theme to how we have approached data work, user stories and use cases, and co-design with domain experts: “centralise data, decentralise views”. Building a central database for open data in a given domain affords ways of interacting with such data that are extremely difficult, or impossible, by actively choosing to decentralise such data. Centralised databases make investigative work that uses the data easier, and allows for the discovery, for example, of patterns across entities and time that can be very hard to discover if data is decentralised. Additionally, by having in place a strong approach to data provenance and reproducibility, the complete replication of a centralised database is relatively easily done, and very much encouraged. This somewhat mitigates a major concern with centralised databases, being that they imply some type of “vendor lock-in”. Views on data are better when decentralised. By “views on data” we refer to visualisations, apps, websites – any user-facing presentation of data. While having data centralised potentially enables richer views, data almost always needs to be presented with additional context, localised, framed in a particular narrative, or otherwise presented in unique ways that will never be best served from a central point. Further, decentralised usage of data provides a feedback mechanism for iteration on the central database. For example, providing commonly used contextual data, establishing clear use cases for enrichment and reconciliation of measures and dimensions in the data, and so on.

Data wrangling before data standards

As a team, we are interested in, engage with, and also author, open data standards. However, we are very wary of efforts to establish a data standard before working with large amounts of data that such a standard is supposed to represent. Data standards that are developed too early are bound to make untested assumptions about the world they seek to formalise (the data itself). There is a dilemma here of describing the world “as it is”, or, “as we would like it to be”. No doubt, a “standards first” approach is valid in some situations. Often, it seems, in the realm of policy. We do not consider such an approach flawed, but rather, one with its own pros and cons. We prefer to work with data, right from extraction and processing, through to user interaction, before working towards public standards, specifications, or any other type of formalisation of the data for a given domain. Our process generally follows this pattern:
  • Get to know available data and establish (with domain experts) initial use cases.
  • Attempt to map what we do not know (e.g.: data that is not yet publicly accessible), as this clearly impacts both usage of the data, and formalisation of a standard.
  • Start data work by prescribing the absolute minimum data specification to use the data (i.e.: meet some or all of the identified use cases).
  • Implement data infrastructure that makes it simple to ingest large amounts of data, and also to keep the data specification reactive to change.
  • Integrate data from a wide variety of sources, and, with partners and users, work on ways to improve participation / contribution of data.
  • Repeat the above steps towards a fairly stable specification for the data.
  • Consider extracting this specification into a data standard.
Throughout this entire process, there is a constant feedback loop with domain expert partners, as well as a range of users interested in the data.

Reflections

We want to be very clear that we do not think that the above approach is the only way to work towards a database in a data-driven project. Design (project design, technical design, interactive design, and so on) emerges from context. Design is also a sequence of choices, and each choice has an opportunity cost based on various constraints that are present in any activity. In projects we engage in around open databases, technology is a means to other, social ends. Collaboration around data is generally facilitated by technology, but we do not think the technological basis for this collaboration should be limited to existing consumer-facing tools, especially if such tools have hidden costs on the path to other important goals, like data provenance and reproducibility. Better tools and processes for collaboration will only emerge over time if we allow exploration and experimentation. We think it is important to understand general approaches to working with open data, and how they may manifest within a single project, or across a range of projects. Project work is not static, and definitely not reducible to snapshots of activity within a wider project life cycle. Certain approaches emphasise different ends. We’ve tried above to highlight some pros and cons of our approach, especially around data provenance and reproducibility, and data standards. In closing, we’d like to invite others interested in approaches to building open databases to engage in a broader discussion around these themes, as well as a discussion around short term and long term goals of such projects. From our perspective, we think there could be a great deal of value for the ecosystem around open data generally – CSOs, NGOs, governments, domain experts, funders – via a proactive discussion or series of posts with a multitude of voices. Join the discussion here if this is of interest to you.

Open Data Index 4ième édition – France, les données sur la transparence de l’action publique manquent à l’appel

pierre chrzanowski - July 3, 2017 in Open Data

À l’occasion des récentes publications de l’Open Data Index et de l’Open Data Barometer pour la période 2016-2017, nous analysons ci-dessous les principaux résultats pour la France.
 
Pour la période 2016-2017, la France se retrouve respectivement 3ème de l’Open Data Barometer et 4ième de l’Open Data Index. Ces résultats confirment les efforts de notre pays en matière de données ouvertes, et nous saluons le travail déjà accompli. Mais notre rôle est de regarder là où nous pouvons mieux faire, et malgré ces bons résultats, notre pays est encore loin d’être un exemple en matière d’open data dans des domaines comme la lutte contre la corruption ou l’intégrité publique, essentielles au rétablissement de la confiance dans l’action publique souhaitée par notre nouveau Gouvernement.

En France, un tiers des données clés sont disponibles en open data selon l’Open Data Index 2016.

Les données sur les dépenses publiques indisponibles

Malgré un plaidoyer constant de notre part et d’autres associations telles que Regards Citoyens et Transparency International, nous constatons que les détails des dépenses publiques (qui a dépensé, qui a reçu, quand, pour quel montant, pour quelle raison) ne sont toujours pas disponibles en open data. Seules les exécutions budgétaires agrégées par administration ou mission sont aujourd’hui disponibles, mais ces chiffres consolidés ne disent pas grand chose de l’activité réelle et détaillée d’une administration et ne permettent certainement pas au contribuable de contrôler où va son argent, et de savoir qui en est responsable. Alors que la moralisation de la vie publique semble de nouveau être une priorité de nos élus, nous attendons encore des engagements précis sur la question de la transparence des dépenses publiques, comme par exemple la mise en open data des données de dépense public géré au sein du système intégré de gestion CHORUS.

Les données sur les marchés publics incomplètes

Les données disponibles en open data sur les attributions des marchés publics en France ne concernent actuellement que les marchés passés par les administrations centrales. Les marchés publics passés avec les autres structures dont les collectivités territoriales (à l’exception de ceux relevant de l’obligation de publication au niveau européen) ne sont toujours pas disponible en open data. Au total, et en l’absence de la mise en œuvre des données ouvertes sur les marchés publics pour l’ensemble des acteurs, plus de la moitié du montant de la commande publique reste opaque en France, soit environ 100 milliards de dépenses, ou encore 5% du PIB de notre pays.
 
Mais la situation est censée évoluer. Selon un décret de mars 2016 (Article 107), tous les acheteurs ont désormais obligation de publier les données essentielles sur les marchés publics. Ils ont jusqu’au 1er octobre 2018 pour se conformer à cette disposition qui ne concernera cependant qu’un nombre limité d’information sur les passations des marchés au regard des bonnes pratiques internationales. En efftet, la France s’était engagée en décembre 2016 au côté du Royaume-Uni, de la Colombie, de l’Ukraine et du Mexique à mettre en œuvre un certain nombre de mesures pour améliorer la performance et l’intégrité des marchés publics. Parmi ces mesures, on trouvait l’adoption du Standard de Données sur la Commande Publique Ouverte (en anglais Open Contracting Data Standard — OCDS) un standard lancé en 2014 par l’Open Contracting Partnership qui vise à améliorer l’efficacité de la commande publique et à mieux détecter les cas de fraudes et de corruption. L’arrêté du 14 avril 2017 relatif aux données essentielles dans la commande publique est malheureusement en deça des principales exigences de l’OCDS. Par exemple, il ne permettra pas d’accéder aux données sur les contrats eux mêmes.

La DGFiP se refuse à ouvrir les données sur le cadastre

Le service public de la donnée, créé par la loi pour une République numérique, visait à mettre à disposition les jeux de données de référence qui présentent le plus fort impact économique et social pour le pays. Le plan cadastral fait partie de ces données clés, mais, à la différence de la plupart des autres données listées dans le décret d’application, n’a toujours pas été mis à disposition en open data par son producteur, la Direction Générale des Finances Publiques (DGFiP). À l’heure de la République numérique, l’accès en open data à ces données est désormais un droit pour le citoyen, et nous attendons donc de la DGFiP qu’elle s’y conforme rapidement en publiant le plan cadastral informatisée dans une licence et dans un format ouverts.

Seul un tiers des données clés disponibles en open data

Pour résumer, force est de constater qu‘en France les jeux de données les plus importants en matière de lutte contre la corruption ou pour le rétablissement de la confiance dans l’action publique sont ceux qui sont le plus difficiles à ouvrir. Notons également que d‘autres jeux de données essentiels posent encore problème. C’est le cas des données sur le registre des adresses, sur les textes de loi et sur les projets de loi, dont les régimes de licence disponibles incluent des clauses les rendant incompatibles avec le régime général des licences open data. Au total, selon l’Open Data Index, seulement un tiers des données clés sont évaluées comme étant totalement ouvertes.
Retrouver les résultats détaillés de l’Open Data Index  et de l’Open Data Barometer

Open Data Index et Open Data Barometer : en savoir plus

L’Open Data Index, mené par Open Knowledge International, est une évaluation annuelle des données ouvertes basée, pour cette édition, sur l’analyse de 15 jeux de données clés dans 94 pays ou territoires. La disponibilité des données est évaluée par des contributeurs bénévoles dans les différents pays et les résultats sont ensuite vérifiés et validés par des experts sélectionnés par Open Knowledge International. Notre groupe local Open Knowledge France participe chaque année à cet effort collectif. Les résultats présentés ci-dessous porte sur la 4ième édition de l’Open Data Index qui concerne la situation en 2016.
 
L’Open Data Barometer, mené par la Web Foundation, est une évaluation annuelle des données ouvertes basée également sur l’analyse de 15 jeux de données clés mais l’évaluation prend également en compte le niveau de préparation du pays à l’ouverture des données (droit d’accès à l’information, existence d’une initiative des données ouvertes au niveau national, etc.) ainsi que l’impact des données ouvertes dans un certain nombre de secteurs dont les services publics, la lutte contre la corruption, l’économie ou l’environnement. L’Open Data Barometer fait appel à des chercheurs rémunérés pour conduire l’évaluation et invite également les Gouvernements à faire leur auto-évaluation. Pour cette édition 115 pays ont été étudiés. L’Open Data Barometer propose également une évaluation de la situation en 2016, pour la 4ième année consécutive.
 
L’Open Data Index et l’Open Data Barometer considèrent l’Open Definition comme définition de référence pour les données ouvertes et utilisent quasiment les mêmes critères pour établir si un jeu de données est ouvert ou non. 
En revanche, les deux évaluations diffèrent sur les jeux de données considérés comme essentiels et leur définition. 
Liste des 15 jeux de données évalués par l’Open Data Barometer :
  • Cartes (cartes politique et topographique)
  • Foncier (cadastre)
  • Statistiques (statistiques démographiques et économiques)
  • Budget (budget prévisionnel)
  • Dépenses (dépenses publiques détaillées)
  • Entreprises (registre des entreprises)
  • Législation (textes de lois)
  • Transport (horaires)
  • Commerce (statistiques commerce international)
  • Santé (performance des services de santé)
  • Éducation (performance du système scolaire)
  • Criminalité (statistiques sur la criminalité)
  • Environnement (émissions de C02, pollution de l’air, déforestation, et qualité de l’eau)
  • Élections (résultats détaillés)
  • Contrats (détail des contrats des marchés publics)
Liste des 15 jeux de données évalués par l’Open Data Index :
  • Budget (budget prévisionnel)
  • Dépenses (dépenses publiques détaillée, au niveau de la transaction)
  • Marchés publics (notification et avis des marchés publics)
  • Résultats des élections (résultats détaillés)
  • Registre des entreprises 
  • Cadastre (propriété foncière)
  • Carte (carte géographique)
  • Prévisions météorologiques (prévisions à 3 jours)
  • Frontières administratives (contours géographique des différents niveau administratifs)
  • Adresses (registre géolocalisé des adresses)
  • Statistiques nationales (statistiques démographiques et économiques)
  • Propositions de lois (textes de lois en discussion au parlement) 
  • Textes de lois (textes de lois votés en application)
  • Qualité de l’air (dont particules fines PM et monoxye de carbone)
  • Qualité de l’eau (nitrates, coliformes fécaux, etc.)
Pour en savoir plus sur la méthodologie d’évaluation de l’Open Data Index https://index.okfn.org/methodology/
 
Pour en savoir plus sur la méthodologie d’évaluation de l’Open Data Barometer https://index.okfn.org/methodology/
 
Nous contacter: contact@okfn.fr

Open Data Index 4ième édition – France, les données sur la transparence de l’action publique manquent à l’appel

pierre chrzanowski - July 3, 2017 in Open Data

À l’occasion des récentes publications de l’Open Data Index et de l’Open Data Barometer pour la période 2016-2017, nous analysons ci-dessous les principaux résultats pour la France.
 
Pour la période 2016-2017, la France se retrouve respectivement 3ème de l’Open Data Barometer et 4ième de l’Open Data Index. Ces résultats confirment les efforts de notre pays en matière de données ouvertes, et nous saluons le travail déjà accompli. Mais notre rôle est de regarder là où nous pouvons mieux faire, et malgré ces bons résultats, notre pays est encore loin d’être un exemple en matière d’open data dans des domaines comme la lutte contre la corruption ou l’intégrité publique, essentielles au rétablissement de la confiance dans l’action publique souhaitée par notre nouveau Gouvernement.

En France, un tiers des données clés sont disponibles en open data selon l’Open Data Index 2016.

Les données sur les dépenses publiques indisponibles

Malgré un plaidoyer constant de notre part et d’autres associations telles que Regards Citoyens et Transparency International, nous constatons que les détails des dépenses publiques (qui a dépensé, qui a reçu, quand, pour quel montant, pour quelle raison) ne sont toujours pas disponibles en open data. Seules les exécutions budgétaires agrégées par administration ou mission sont aujourd’hui disponibles, mais ces chiffres consolidés ne disent pas grand chose de l’activité réelle et détaillée d’une administration et ne permettent certainement pas au contribuable de contrôler où va son argent, et de savoir qui en est responsable. Alors que la moralisation de la vie publique semble de nouveau être une priorité de nos élus, nous attendons encore des engagements précis sur la question de la transparence des dépenses publiques, comme par exemple la mise en open data des données de dépense public géré au sein du système intégré de gestion CHORUS.

Les données sur les marchés publics incomplètes

Les données disponibles en open data sur les attributions des marchés publics en France ne concernent actuellement que les marchés passés par les administrations centrales. Les marchés publics passés avec les autres structures dont les collectivités territoriales (à l’exception de ceux relevant de l’obligation de publication au niveau européen) ne sont toujours pas disponible en open data. Au total, et en l’absence de la mise en œuvre des données ouvertes sur les marchés publics pour l’ensemble des acteurs, plus de la moitié du montant de la commande publique reste opaque en France, soit environ 100 milliards de dépenses, ou encore 5% du PIB de notre pays.
 
Mais la situation est censée évoluer. Selon un décret de mars 2016 (Article 107), tous les acheteurs ont désormais obligation de publier les données essentielles sur les marchés publics. Ils ont jusqu’au 1er octobre 2018 pour se conformer à cette disposition qui ne concernera cependant qu’un nombre limité d’information sur les passations des marchés au regard des bonnes pratiques internationales. En efftet, la France s’était engagée en décembre 2016 au côté du Royaume-Uni, de la Colombie, de l’Ukraine et du Mexique à mettre en œuvre un certain nombre de mesures pour améliorer la performance et l’intégrité des marchés publics. Parmi ces mesures, on trouvait l’adoption du Standard de Données sur la Commande Publique Ouverte (en anglais Open Contracting Data Standard — OCDS) un standard lancé en 2014 par l’Open Contracting Partnership qui vise à améliorer l’efficacité de la commande publique et à mieux détecter les cas de fraudes et de corruption. L’arrêté du 14 avril 2017 relatif aux données essentielles dans la commande publique est malheureusement en deça des principales exigences de l’OCDS. Par exemple, il ne permettra pas d’accéder aux données sur les contrats eux mêmes.

La DGFiP se refuse à ouvrir les données sur le cadastre

Le service public de la donnée, créé par la loi pour une République numérique, visait à mettre à disposition les jeux de données de référence qui présentent le plus fort impact économique et social pour le pays. Le plan cadastral fait partie de ces données clés, mais, à la différence de la plupart des autres données listées dans le décret d’application, n’a toujours pas été mis à disposition en open data par son producteur, la Direction Générale des Finances Publiques (DGFiP). À l’heure de la République numérique, l’accès en open data à ces données est désormais un droit pour le citoyen, et nous attendons donc de la DGFiP qu’elle s’y conforme rapidement en publiant le plan cadastral informatisée dans une licence et dans un format ouverts.

Seul un tiers des données clés disponibles en open data

Pour résumer, force est de constater qu‘en France les jeux de données les plus importants en matière de lutte contre la corruption ou pour le rétablissement de la confiance dans l’action publique sont ceux qui sont le plus difficiles à ouvrir. Notons également que d‘autres jeux de données essentiels posent encore problème. C’est le cas des données sur le registre des adresses, sur les textes de loi et sur les projets de loi, dont les régimes de licence disponibles incluent des clauses les rendant incompatibles avec le régime général des licences open data. Au total, selon l’Open Data Index, seulement un tiers des données clés sont évaluées comme étant totalement ouvertes.
Retrouver les résultats détaillés de l’Open Data Index  et de l’Open Data Barometer

Open Data Index et Open Data Barometer : en savoir plus

L’Open Data Index, mené par Open Knowledge International, est une évaluation annuelle des données ouvertes basée, pour cette édition, sur l’analyse de 15 jeux de données clés dans 94 pays ou territoires. La disponibilité des données est évaluée par des contributeurs bénévoles dans les différents pays et les résultats sont ensuite vérifiés et validés par des experts sélectionnés par Open Knowledge International. Notre groupe local Open Knowledge France participe chaque année à cet effort collectif. Les résultats présentés ci-dessous porte sur la 4ième édition de l’Open Data Index qui concerne la situation en 2016.
 
L’Open Data Barometer, mené par la Web Foundation, est une évaluation annuelle des données ouvertes basée également sur l’analyse de 15 jeux de données clés mais l’évaluation prend également en compte le niveau de préparation du pays à l’ouverture des données (droit d’accès à l’information, existence d’une initiative des données ouvertes au niveau national, etc.) ainsi que l’impact des données ouvertes dans un certain nombre de secteurs dont les services publics, la lutte contre la corruption, l’économie ou l’environnement. L’Open Data Barometer fait appel à des chercheurs rémunérés pour conduire l’évaluation et invite également les Gouvernements à faire leur auto-évaluation. Pour cette édition 115 pays ont été étudiés. L’Open Data Barometer propose également une évaluation de la situation en 2016, pour la 4ième année consécutive.
 
L’Open Data Index et l’Open Data Barometer considèrent l’Open Definition comme définition de référence pour les données ouvertes et utilisent quasiment les mêmes critères pour établir si un jeu de données est ouvert ou non. 
En revanche, les deux évaluations diffèrent sur les jeux de données considérés comme essentiels et leur définition. 
Liste des 15 jeux de données évalués par l’Open Data Barometer :
  • Cartes (cartes politique et topographique)
  • Foncier (cadastre)
  • Statistiques (statistiques démographiques et économiques)
  • Budget (budget prévisionnel)
  • Dépenses (dépenses publiques détaillées)
  • Entreprises (registre des entreprises)
  • Législation (textes de lois)
  • Transport (horaires)
  • Commerce (statistiques commerce international)
  • Santé (performance des services de santé)
  • Éducation (performance du système scolaire)
  • Criminalité (statistiques sur la criminalité)
  • Environnement (émissions de C02, pollution de l’air, déforestation, et qualité de l’eau)
  • Élections (résultats détaillés)
  • Contrats (détail des contrats des marchés publics)
Liste des 15 jeux de données évalués par l’Open Data Index :
  • Budget (budget prévisionnel)
  • Dépenses (dépenses publiques détaillée, au niveau de la transaction)
  • Marchés publics (notification et avis des marchés publics)
  • Résultats des élections (résultats détaillés)
  • Registre des entreprises 
  • Cadastre (propriété foncière)
  • Carte (carte géographique)
  • Prévisions météorologiques (prévisions à 3 jours)
  • Frontières administratives (contours géographique des différents niveau administratifs)
  • Adresses (registre géolocalisé des adresses)
  • Statistiques nationales (statistiques démographiques et économiques)
  • Propositions de lois (textes de lois en discussion au parlement) 
  • Textes de lois (textes de lois votés en application)
  • Qualité de l’air (dont particules fines PM et monoxye de carbone)
  • Qualité de l’eau (nitrates, coliformes fécaux, etc.)
Pour en savoir plus sur la méthodologie d’évaluation de l’Open Data Index https://index.okfn.org/methodology/
 
Pour en savoir plus sur la méthodologie d’évaluation de l’Open Data Barometer https://index.okfn.org/methodology/
 
Nous contacter: contact@okfn.fr

Hackathon al Gran Sasso Science Institute! Iscrivetevi, avete tempo fino al 1 Luglio!

Francesca De Chiara - June 23, 2017 in civic tech, Events, Open Data

In occasione del Festival della Partecipazione, il Gran Sasso Science Institute (GSSI) organizza il 7 e 8 luglio prossimi a L’Aquila un Hackathon per sviluppare progetti di prodotti, di servizi o rappresentazioni visuali utili, sostenibili e replicabili, in grado di generare un impatto significativo nei modi di pensare, vivere e condividere la ricostruzione e le future […]