You are browsing the archive for Open Data.

Frictionless Planet – Save the Date

- January 10, 2022 in Events, News, Open Data, Open Knowledge, Open Knowledge Foundation

We believe that an ecosystem of organisations combining tools, techniques and strategies to transform datasets relevant to the climate crisis into applied knowledge and actionable campaigns can get us closer to the Paris agreement goals. Today, scientists, academics and activists are working against the clock to save us from the greatest catastrophe of our times. But they are doing so under-resourced, siloed and disconnected. Sometimes even facing physical threats or achieving very local, isolated impact. We want to reverse that by activating a cross-sectoral sharing process of tools, techniques and technologies to open the data and unleash the power of knowledge to fight against climate change. We already started with the Frictionless Data process – collaborating with researcher groups to better manage ocean research data and openly publish cleaned, integrated energy data – and we want to expand an action-oriented alliance leading to cross regional, cross sectoral, sustainable collaboration. We need to use the best tools and the best minds of our times to fight the problems of our times.  We consider you-your organisation- as leading thinkers-doers-communicators leveraging technology and creativity in a unique way, with the potential to lead to meaningful change and we would love to invite you to an initial brainstorming session as we think of common efforts, a sustainability path and a road of action to work the next three years and beyond.  What will we do together during this brainstorming session? Our overarching goal is to make open climate data more useful. To that end, during this initial session, we will conceptualise ways of cleaning and standardising open climate data, creating more reproducible and efficient methods of consuming and analysing that data, and focus on ways to put this data into the hands of those that can truly drive change.  WHAT TO BRING?
  • An effort-idea that is effective and you feel proud of at the intersection of digital and climate change.
  • A data problem you are struggling with.
  • Your best post-holidays smile.
When? 13:30 GMT – 20 January – Registration open here. 20:30 GMT – 21 January – Registration opening here. Limited slots, 25 attendees per session. 

The beginning of an open friendship: Belarus, Latvia and Sweden have been collaborating for a year

- December 20, 2021 in Open Data, pressmeddelande

Open Knowledge Sweden together with the NGO Mana Balss (My Voice in English) in Latvia and with Belarusian partners has concluded the project Open data for civic participation The goal of the project was to exchange knowledge and experiences between NGOs in Sweden, Latvia and Belarus about the availability and the use of the open data for civic participation, and ultimately to make civic activism more informed and effective. During the project, Open Knowledge Sweden conducted research, awareness raising, and engaged stakeholders in discussions about the situation with open data in Sweden in order to understand what is needed to enable further data openness. We have interviewed different types of actors working in the open data field in Sweden representing academia, public sector, journalists, and experts in open data. As a result we have published a Brief and an Open Letter addressed to public officials and policy makers with recommendations about the way forward in the field of open data in Sweden. The project has also delivered case studies on open data readiness and use for civic participation in Sweden, Latvia and Belarus. The key takeaway from the Swedish case studies is that the open data field can grow in a sustainable way if everyone cooperates: the public and private sectors, as well as civil society. The project case studies from the three countries have fed into the Digital Transformation Toolkit aimed at civic activists, public sector representatives and policy makers.  Finally, pulling together all of the partners’ knowledge and experience, we have jointly drafted a strategic document to map out the framework for further cooperation. Presently, we are in the process of putting together project concepts and proposals. If you would like more information about the project or if you would like to join us in the work on open data in Sweden, contact Alina Östling (OKS co-chair): alina@okfn.se   The project received support from the Nordic Council of Ministers’ funding programme for NGO co-operation in the Baltic Sea Region. <a href="https://unsplash.com/@calvinhanson?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText%22%3ECalvin%20Hanson%3C/a%3E%20on%20%3Ca%20href=https://okfn.se/2021/12/20/the-beginning-of-an-open-friendship-belarus-latvia-and-sweden-have-been-collaborating-for-a-year/>Photo (above) by Calvin Hanson on Unsplash  

Samarbete är vägen framåt inom det öppna datafältet 

- December 14, 2021 in Analysis, Norden project, Open Data, OpenUp, project

Vi har publicerat fallstudier om öppna data i Sverige, genomförd som en del av projektet Open data for civic participation finansierat av Nordiska ministerrådets program för NGO-samarbete i Östersjöregionen. Fallstudien analyserar läget för öppna data i Sverige och tittar på tre fall av dataaktivism: 
  1. Trafiklab – en öppen plattform för innovation inom svensk kollektivtrafik.
  2. Skjutsgruppen– en ideell och deltagardriven samåkningsrörelse. 
  3. OpenUp!-projektet för att stödja publicering av upphandlingsdata som Open Knowledge Sweden genomförde 2020-2021.
Den största lärdomen från denna studie är att det öppna datafältet kan växa på ett hållbart sätt om alla samarbetar: den offentliga och privata sektorn, såväl som det civila samhället. Nu, med tanke på nästa års allmänna val och den kommande utvecklingen av nästa Open Government Partnership-plan (som också kommer 2022) är ett bra tillfälle att intensifiera arbetet med öppna data för allmänhetens bästa. Länken till rapporten finns nedan och ni är välkomna att kontakta alina@okfn.se med frågor eller ideer. Open Data for Civic Participation Case study: Sweden: https://docs.google.com/document/d/14w4U1W6O47McsMlifszqIGreYMPdB35M/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=102210550528524961663&rtpof=true&sd=true Målet med projektet Open data for civic participation var att utbyta kunskap och erfarenheter mellan icke-statliga organisationer i Sverige, Lettland och Vitryssland om användningen av öppna data för medborgardeltagande och bidra till att göra medborgaraktivism effektivare.

Our brief about Open Data priorities in Sweden has just been published

- December 6, 2021 in Analysis, Norden project, OKFN Sweden, Open Data, Sweden

The final version of the brief that was initially drafted in October 2021 i out. Special thanks to Jonathan Crusoe, Daniel Dersén, Sumbat Daniel Sarkis, Per Hagström for  valuable contributions! The aim of the brief, and of the interviews that lead up to it, was to carry out awareness-raising and to engage stakeholders in discussions about the state of open data and the possible actions towards further data openness in Sweden. This awareness raising activity was based on case study findings conducted earlier this year and included interviews with different types of stakeholders engaged in open data topics (i.e. academics, public officials, journalists, and active users/practitioners of open data). It resulted in this brief and in an Open Letter to public officials and policy makers with recommendations about the way forward in the field of open data in Sweden. The brief was drafted in the framework of the project “Open data for civic participation”, run by Open Knowledge Sweden together with the NGO “My Voice” in Latvia and with Belarusian partners. This project is implemented with the support of the Nordic Council of Ministers’ funding programme for NGO co-operation in the Baltic Sea Region. The goal of the project is to exchange knowledge and experiences between the NGOs in Sweden, Latvia and Belarus about the availability and the use of the open data for civic participation, and ultimately to make civic activism more informed and effective.

Open Knowledge Sweden joins new project to foster the development of digital tools to fight corruption in the Nordic-Baltic region

- November 4, 2021 in Open Data

Open Knowledge Sweden joins new project to foster the development of digital tools to fight corruption in the Nordic-Baltic region Photo by Adrian Trinkaus on Unsplash Open Knowledge Sweden is partnering in a new project funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers Office in Latvia and led by Transparency International Latvia, called “Harnessing digital tools to tackle corruption in the Nordic-Baltic Region”. The project, which also features Transparency International Estonia, aims to foster Nordic-Baltic cooperation in the disclosure of essential anti-corruption data and in the development of digital tools enabling citizens and journalists to prevent and detect corruption.  The project will run until February 2022, and some of the main activities will include 
  • Research and analysis on the availability, accessibility, and quality of key anti-corruption data in Latvia, Sweden and Estonia
  • Development work on the digital platforms “Open Up!” by Open Knowledge Sweden, “Opener” by TI Estonia and TI Latvia, and “Deputāti uz Delnas” by TI Latvia. 
  • Organisation a regional roundtable gathering public officials and experts from the three countries to discuss cooperation in disclosure of relevant anti-corruption-related datasets, including application of common standards 
In specific, Open Knowledge Sweden will work on the development of a technical concept document outlining next steps and possible ways to improve “Open Up”, a digital platform launched in 2021 in cooperation with the Swedish Digitalisation Agency (DIGG) and with the financial support of the Swedish Innovation Agency. The platform aims to foster transparency of public expenditures in Swedish municipalities, by gathering information on invoices of those that have provided it in open data format Civil society representatives, journalists, data scientists, and public officials: Please get in touch for more information or just to discuss ideas.  Contact: antonio@okfn.se  This project is funded by the Nordic Council of Minister Office in Latvia. The content of this publication is the sole responsibility of the coordinator of the project and does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Nordic Council of Ministers.   

Open Letter: Open data priorities in Sweden

- November 1, 2021 in Open Data

Data produced by the public sector constitutes a comprehensive and valuable resource that can benefit society as a whole. The value of just a minor share of the data available – so called high-value open data – is estimated to be SEK 10-21 billion per year for Sweden. At the same time, several open data experts agree that the progress on open data in Sweden has been slow, even if some good practices, (regional) champions and models have emerged in recent times. These are their recommendations to speed up the release and reuse of data:

Follow “high-value, high-impact” and “publish with purpose” principles

According to the doctoral thesis of one of the interviewees, Jonathan Crusoe, open data practitioners “should follow the principles “high-value, high-impact” and “publish with purpose” (1) rather than “open by default” or “raw data now” principles”(2). The work on defining high value datasets at the national level has just recently begun in Sweden, prompted by the EU’s Open Data Directive that requires Member States to publish a list of high-value datasets free of charge. The EU considers these datasets to have a high commercial potential and a source for the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI). The interviewees suggested that climate-related data, procurement data and registries of public documents (“diarier”) are of high-value. 

Invest in basic public data

High-quality and standardised basic data can be combined and used across systems, countries and sectors to create value and expand knowledge. These data are much needed by many actors ranging from tax authorities to journalists. Sweden could learn from Denmark’s “Basic Data Programme”, which collects data across the country’s IT systems, so that the public and private sector can use them efficiently. They also have a Data Distribution Platform in place that provides authorities and companies with easy and secure access to basic data in one joint system rather than many different ones, which in turn saves on operational costs and support, while the data re-users can find information in one place.

Stimulate collaboration across sectors and between actors

There is a need for forums where data holders and reusers can meet, exchange knowledge and where the future of open data can be discussed. Some initiatives are already planned. The Agency for Digital Government (DIGG) is already planning initiatives to boost collaboration between actors who share and use data, where special focus will be placed on the use and value of data in authorities’ day-to-day operations. Another upcoming initiative (if funding is confirmed) is the “Dataverkstan” (Data workshop) that will be a knowledge and coordination hub, where local (and national) authorities can turn for support and advise. However, more structural support and funding will be needed for Sweden to rise to the top-ranks on open data. 

Develop a taxonomy to classify and showcase open data uses and solutions

There is a need to develop a taxonomy to classify open data uses and solutions in Sweden, in order to understand and showcase where open data can create value and what data/solutions should be prioritised. 

Think in terms of “data for the people” and involve civil society

The government should invest in data for the people. Open data should make the difference for ordinary citizens, not just replicate existing data or app solutions. Citizens’ needs should be in focus. This is also where civil society can support the release and reuse of open data, e.g. by identifying groups of users of certain data so as to show the authorities that the data can create value for the general public if it becomes open. See details about the method, sources and references in the “ODCP Brief: Raising awareness about open data in Sweden”.  Contact: alina@okfn.se  This Open letter is posted in the framework of the project “Open data for civic participation”, run by Open Knowledge Sweden together with the NGO “My Voice” in Latvia and with Belarusian partners. This project is implemented with the support of the Nordic Council of Ministers’ funding programme for NGO co-operation in the Baltic Sea Region. The goal of the project is to exchange knowledge and experiences between the NGOs in Sweden, Latvia and Belarus about the availability and the use of the open data for civic participation, and ultimately to make civic activism more informed and effective. During the project, we engaged stakeholders in discussions about the situation with open data in Sweden in order to understand what is needed to enable further data openness. To this end, we interviewed different types of actors working in the open data field in Sweden representing academia, public sector, journalists, and experts in open data. As a result we have published a brief and this Open Letter addressed to public officials and policy makers with recommendations about the way forward in the field of open data in Sweden.
Photo above by Viktor Forgacs on Unsplash
(1) Ubaldi 2013 and Calderon 2018 in Crusoe 2021. (2) Open Data Charter 2015; and Berners-Lee 2009 in Crusoe 2021; and Crusoe 2021, p. iv.  

Så här begär du ut en allmän handling med Handlingar.se

- September 7, 2021 in Open Data

Offentlighetsprincipen gör det möjligt!

Har du någonsin funderat över hur mycket pengar din kommun betalade för den där nya byggnaden i staden? Eller kanske har du läst en nyhetsartikel om en myndighets arbete och funderat på de omständigheter och fakta som ligger bakom artikeln? Kanske är du intresserad av en fastighet i närheten av ditt hus, eller att du försöker avslöja fakta om något som hände för många år sedan. Det här är bara några få exempel på när Offentlighetsprincipen kan vara bra att använda. Här i Sverige har vem som helst rätt att begära tillgång till information från offentligt finansierade organisationer. Du kan be centrala och lokala myndigheter, sjukvården, försvaret, statligt finansierade skolor och tillsynsmyndigheterna för institutioner som välgörenhetsorganisationer, företag och andra organisationer om uppgifter och handlingar – och de måste svara. Alla är inte medvetna om att de har denna rättighet, och om de gör det vet de ofta inte var de ska börja. Det är därför som vi 2018 startade Handlingar.se, en plattform som främjar användandet av Offentlighetsprincipen. Vi vill göra det så enkelt som möjligt att begära ut allmänna handlingar – det är din rättighet. Korrespondensen med myndigheterna publiceras även på nätet så att andra kan dra nytta av dina resultat. Du bidrar till att göra offentlig information offentlig!

Vad kan du begära ut?

Notera att Offentlighetsprincipen och Tryckfrihetsförordningen omfattar din rätt att begära ut fakta och siffror, data och, ja… all registrerad information som offentlig sektor producerar i sin verksamhet, dock med vissa undantag. Handlingar.se är inte till för att du ska begära ut information om dig själv eller annan privatperson. Det är inte heller platsen för luddiga, indirekta frågor eller förfrågningar om yttranden och åsikter. Dessutom är det ingen poäng att begära ut handlingar som organisationen inte innehar, eller som redan finns tillgängligt offentligt på deras hemsida. På Handlingar.se hjälpsidor finns det mer information om detta, liksom länkar till bra källor.

Hur gör man en förfrågan?

(Observera att första versionen av denna guide lånar bilder med engelsk text från systerplattformen WhatDoTheyKnow.com i Storbritannien. Bilder från FrågaStaten.se kommer snart!)

Vi startade Handlingar.se för att göra processen att begära ut allmänna handlingar enkelt och tillgängligt för alla. Vi har sammanställt en guide nedan. Följ dessa steg så kan du också göra en begäran om allmän handling.

1. Gå till Handlingar.se

Handlingar-Framsida   Handlingar.se är vår webbplats där du kan göra en begäran om allmän handling med stöd av Offentlighetsprincipen: du hittar Handlingar.se här.  

2. Registrera eller logga in

Handlingar-Login Om det är första gången du använder webbplatsen måste du registrera dig för att Handlingar.se t.ex. ska kunna uppmärksamma dig när du får ditt svar. Ange din e-postadress, namn (eller pseudonym, se SCB:s namnstatistik för tips på kombinationer) och ett lösenord till höger på sidan. Använd gärna en lösenordshanterare.  Kontrollera sedan din e-post för bekräftelselänken innan du kan fortsätta. Om du inte kan hitta e-postbekräftelsen, kontrollera din skräppostmapp. Du behöver bara gå igenom denna process en gång. Om du har ett konto, och är inloggad på webbplatsen, är din begäran skickad så fort du klickar på “Skicka”-knappen.

3. Kontrollera att ingen annan redan har begärt ut den information du vill begära.

Innan du gör din förfrågan råder vi dig att söka via valfri sökmotor eller på Handlingar.se för att säkerställa att informationen inte redan har publicerats. Du ska inte begära ut handlingar som redan finns öppet publicerade, på Handlingar.se eller annan webbplats eller motsvarande. Du kan använda sökrutan till höger på Handlingar.se hemsida för att kontrollera om uppgifterna redan finns på vår webbplats. Sök efter namnet på den myndighet som du vill göra din förfrågan till..  

4. Formulera din begäran

När du är säker på att ingen har gjort en likadan begäran tidigare, kan du göra din egen. klickar på den orangea knappen vid “Gör en begäran” Skriv en rad som sammanfattar din begäran i form av en titel. Andra användare kan då hitta din förfrågan på plattformen om de söker efter liknande information.   Det finns några praktiska tips i högerspalten: se till att hålla ditt meddelande kortfattat och fokuserat. Det ger bäst resultat. Ta inte med synpunkter eller klagomål: myndigheten är endast skyldig att svara på förfrågningar om information. Handlingar.se är inte en plattform för åsikter och tyckande. Var noga med att ange ditt namn. Du har även rätt att vara anonym och kan istället ange en pseudonym under “Med vänlig hälsning”-signaturen.   Förfrågningar gjorda via Handlingar. publiceras på webbplatsen samtidigt som förfrågningar skickas till den offentliga myndigheten.

5. Kontrollera din begäran

Klicka på “förhandsgranska din offentliga begäran” för att kontrollera att allt är som du vill innan du skickar den. Om du vill ändra i din begäran, t ex lägga till eller ta bort, kan du klicka på “redigera denna begäran”. När du är klar, klicka på “skicka förfrågan”.    

6. Vänta på ditt svar

När myndigheten svarar kommer Handlingar.se att skicka ett automatiskt e-postmeddelande till dig. Svaret publiceras även på webbplatsen; ett e-postmeddelande kommer att innehålla länkar till svaret. Du får kommentera svaret, och om myndigheten ber om klargörande kan du skicka en uppföljning kring din begäran om så skulle behövas. Om de behöver en postadress, kan du även lämna den privat till myndigheten. I Sverige ska myndigheter svara “skyndsamt” vilket innebär 1-2 arbetsdagar. Om du inte har fått något svar inom rimlig tid, kommer webbplatsen automatiskt att skicka dig information om nästa steg som du bör ta. Det är allt!

En sista tanke

Många kommuner offentliggör proaktivt information som exempelvis kommentarer på planering – vilket innebär att en begäran som görs ovan av en person i exemplet inte skulle vara nödvändigt. Det är alltid bra att kontrollera deras hemsida först, för att spara tid, pengar och energi för både dig och myndigheten. Om kommunen inte publicerar denna typ av information som en självklarhet, då kan processen att göra en begäran om allmän handling resultera i två saker. För det första gör det kommunens svar offentligt, så att alla kan se det – och för det andra går det att visa att det finns en efterfrågan på denna typ av information. Din begäran kan visa på ett allmänt intresse för att din kommun ska börja publicera mer information. Har du synpunkter och förslag inför kommande förbättringar av guiden välkomnar vi det med glädje! Mejla till info[snabel-a]handlingar[punkt]nu.  

Open Data Student Award 2021 – Ausschreibung

- August 3, 2021 in forum, Open Data, Student Award, Students

Open Data Student Award 2021

Offene Daten sind eine unabdingbare Folge der Digitalisierung. Darum hat sich der Verein Opendata.ch entschlossen, einen Studierenden-Preis zu stiften. Dieser Preis steht für herausragende Anwendungen von offenen Daten in Lehre und Weiterbildung. Als Sponsoren mit dabei sind die SBB, die Swisscom, sowie Netcetera. Mit dem Award wird eine studentische Arbeit ausgezeichnet, die zuhanden der Gewinner mit einem Preisgeld in der Höhe von insgesamt CHF 1000 honoriert wird. Die Auszeichnung erfolgt anlässlich des Opendata.ch/2021 Forums am 12. Oktober 2021.

Vergabe-Kriterien

Die studentische Arbeit verwendet in beispielhafter Weise Open Data und/oder Open Government Data (OGD) mit Bezug zur Schweiz. Sie verwendet wo sinnvoll Datenvisualisierung und offene Standards (Dateiformate, Webdienste). Das Ergebnis kann eine schriftliche Arbeit oder eine Applikation sein. Sie steht idealerweise für Open Science was auch Open Source einschliesst und ist reproduzierbar inklusive Rohdaten und Programmskripte. Bewertet werden die Neuartigkeit, die Kreativität, die Wirtschaftlichkeit, die Dokumentation, die Praxisrelevanz, wie auch die vorbildliche Nutzung von OD oder OGD. Der/die Verfasser/in der Arbeit erklären sich mit der Eingabe sowie der Veröffentlichung der Arbeit und der Medien (Fotos und Videos) einverstanden. Hier findet ihr die Gewinnerprojekte der vergangenen Jahre: 2018 | 2019 | 2020

Teilnahmeberechtigung

Teilnahmeberechtigt sind alle Studierenden einer Schweizer Hochschule. Folgende Formen sind erlaubt:
  • Studienleistung einer Hochschule (inkl. CAS)
  • Übungs- oder Praktikumsarbeit
  • Semesterarbeit, Bachelor- oder Masterarbeit
  • Private Arbeit von einem aktuell immatrikulierten Studierenden

Nominierung und Einreichung

  • Kurzbeschreibung (One Pager) inkl. Abbildung
  • Studienleistung (PDF und/oder Link zur App)
Die Einreichung muss vor dem 25. September 2021 vollständig und fristgerecht durch die Studierenden erfolgen. Einreichung per Mail an andrea.allemann@opendata.ch. Der Preis wird im Rahmen des Opendata.ch/2021 Forum am 12. Oktober vergeben. Die Teilnahme der Nominierten am Forum wird erwartet. Über die Preisvergabe wird keine Korrespondenz geführt.

Thanks to the Sponsors of this years Open Data Student Award:

Opendata.ch/2021 Forum Call for Sessios

- August 2, 2021 in Bern, Daten, forum, Open Data, Open Knowledge Conference

Opendata.ch/2021 Forum ist all about openness – and we love living our mission! For this year’s forum (which is happening IRL) we’re inviting our ecosystem to host a session during the day. This can be a short workshop, a discussion round, a fireside chat, a think lab session or a presentation – the format is up to you!  While, this year’s topic is “Shedding Light on the Invisible (Data)” – it’s not a necessary requirement that your session fits the topic. As long as your session covers data as the main topic you’re good to go!  Do you want to share your insights and skills or fuel an interesting discussion? Sign up for a slot during the Opendata.ch/ 2021 Forum by writing to: darienne.hunziker@opendata.ch and sharing the following information (deadline is September 5th): 
  • Your name, email address and institution/company
  • Title of the session
  • A short description of the session you would like to host
  • Material you need 
  • Min/max participants 
  • Language of your session (English or German)
Sessions will be 30-45 minutes. If you have other time requirements, please let us know. If you would like to give a presentation, please allow for a couple of minutes at the end of your presentation for questions. opendata.ch/2021 Forum details: 
  • 12th October 2021
  • Language English / German 
  • Location: Generationenhaus Bern 
Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions.  We’re looking forward to hearing from you! 

Announcing the winner of the Net Zero Challenge 2021

- April 27, 2021 in Net Zero Challenge, News, Open Data

Net Zero Challenge logo
Three months ago, the team at Open Knowledge Foundation launched a new project – the Net Zero Challenge – a global competition to identify, promote and support innovative, practical and scalable uses of open data that advance climate action.
We received over 80 applications from 40 different countries. Many of them were excellent.
From the applications, we chose a shortlist of five teams to compete in a live pitch contest event. Each team had three minutes to explain their project or concept, and up to seven minutes to take questions from the Panel of Experts and the live audience.
Watch the recording of the live event here.
Today we are pleased to announce the winner of the Net Zero Challenge 2021 is CarbonGeoScales – a framework for standardising open data for GHG emissions at multiple geographical scales. The project is built by a team of volunteers from France – supported by Data for Good and Open Geo Scales. You can check out their Github here.
The winning prize for the Net Zero Challenge is USD$1000 – which, we are told, will be spent on cloud storage.
A few days ago, we caught up with the team from CarbonGeoScales to learn about who they are, what they are doing and how their project uses open data to advance climate action.
Watch our interview with the CarbonGeoScales team here.
We would like to thank all the teams who competed in the Net Zero Challenge 2021 – especially the four other teams who were all shortlisted for the pitch contest. We are grateful to the Panel of Experts to taking the time to judge the contest – especially to Bonnie Lei from Microsoft’s AI for Earth – who joined at the last minute. Thanks also to Open Data Charter and the Open Data & Innovation Team at Transport for New South Wales for their strategic advice during the development of this project.
The Net Zero Challenge has been supported by our partners Microsoft and the UK Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office.