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The Open Education Working Group: What do we do and what is coming up next

Javiera Atenas - August 22, 2017 in open-education, WG Open Education

The Open Education Working Group (https://education.okfn.org) is a very active community of educators, researchers, PhD students, policy makers and advocates that promote, support and collaborate with projects related with the advancement of Open Education in different fields at international level. This group aims at supporting the development of Open Educational projects at international level but also, at promoting good practices in Open Education. In this blog we give an update on our recent activities. The coordinators of the group are Paul Bacsich (@pbacsich) (Open Policies), a professor with a large experience in educational policy and open education, Annalisa Manca (@AnnalisaManca) (Open Science), an expert in critical pedagogy currently completing her PhD in Medical Education and Javiera Atenas @jatenas (Open Data) a lecturer with a PhD in Education with interest in Open Data and Media Literacies. Our ethos is to be a platform that promotes Openness in education at all levels, including OER, Open Science, Open Education and Open Access focusing on Open Educational Practices to democratise and enhance education at all levels. Our mission is to support organisations and individuals to implement, support and develop Open Education projects, research and policies and also to support communities of open practice towards ensuring that everyone can have democratic access to education. In the last years we have done lots of things, published books, worked with Open Education international organisations, and participated in a large number of projects, some of which can be summarised as follows: Publication of the Open Educator Handbook, which has been written to provide a useful point of reference for readers with a range of different roles and interests who are interested in learning more about the concept of Open Education and to help them deal with a variety of practical situations. Publication of the book Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of Emerging Practice. This book contains a series of case studies related with use of open data as pedagogical materials. The authors of this chapters are academics and practitioners who have been using open data in different educational scenarios and the cases present different dynamics and approaches for the use of open data in the classroom. Involvement in the POERUP policy project and the OpenMed project, aimed at opening up teaching and learning resources in the southern Mediterranean countries – in partnership with UniMed Rome. Organisation of a pre-Open Data Day event at UCL,  which was round table to discuss challenges and opportunities of the use of open data as teaching and learning resources with a group of expert  and practitioners  and with the Latin American Open Data Initiative. We also organised a course for academics on Open Data as Open Educational Resources with the support of the Open Education Unit of the Universidad de la República Uruguay in partnership with A Scuola di OpenCoesione. The outcome of the course can be read in the blog Putting research into practice: Training academics to use Open Data as OER: An experience from Uruguay. In regards with campaigning we have worked with Communia in support for their rightcopyright.eu campaign for better education, aimed at collecting petitions from educators throughout Europe to let the European Parliamentarians know we need a better copyright for education. You can read more about it in this blog. Our blog at https://education.okfn.org/blog reflects the current state of the arts in Open Education around the world. We have blog posts from Croatia, Sweden, Brazil, Scotland, Finland, Germany, Italy and Spain on different topics, from Open Educational Resources Toolkits, Open Education Policy, Open Data and Open Education  Research. In our forum we have spaces for different communities of practice to interact, exchange and discuss. You can join the discussion through: https://discuss.okfn.org/c/working-groups/open-education At the moment we are supporting the 101openstories, a collaborative project led by a group of Open Practitioners aimed at collecting stories and ideas of openness from educators, researchers and learners in general. Also, we are supporting the development of local Open Education Working Groups such as the Italian network of Open Educators, who met recently in Bologna to discuss an agenda to promote and enhance open education accross all the educational sectors in Italy (read more). In this Year of Open we will be participating in a series of events and congresses, including the Latin American Open Data Conference in Costa Rica in August, Con Datos and the OER congress in Slovenia in September. Also, we have joined the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data towards collaborating with different initiatives towards improving Open Data literacies. We are always open to collaborations and willing to support innovative projects on Open Education. If you would like to get in touch with us, you will find us on twitter as @okfnedu or via email at okfn.edu@gmail.com.

The Open Education Working Group: What do we do and what is coming up next

Javiera Atenas - August 22, 2017 in open-education, WG Open Education

The Open Education Working Group (https://education.okfn.org) is a very active community of educators, researchers, PhD students, policy makers and advocates that promote, support and collaborate with projects related with the advancement of Open Education in different fields at international level. This group aims at supporting the development of Open Educational projects at international level but also, at promoting good practices in Open Education. In this blog we give an update on our recent activities. The coordinators of the group are Paul Bacsich (@pbacsich) (Open Policies), a professor with a large experience in educational policy and open education, Annalisa Manca (@AnnalisaManca) (Open Science), an expert in critical pedagogy currently completing her PhD in Medical Education and Javiera Atenas @jatenas (Open Data) a lecturer with a PhD in Education with interest in Open Data and Media Literacies. Our ethos is to be a platform that promotes Openness in education at all levels, including OER, Open Science, Open Education and Open Access focusing on Open Educational Practices to democratise and enhance education at all levels. Our mission is to support organisations and individuals to implement, support and develop Open Education projects, research and policies and also to support communities of open practice towards ensuring that everyone can have democratic access to education. In the last years we have done lots of things, published books, worked with Open Education international organisations, and participated in a large number of projects, some of which can be summarised as follows: Publication of the Open Educator Handbook, which has been written to provide a useful point of reference for readers with a range of different roles and interests who are interested in learning more about the concept of Open Education and to help them deal with a variety of practical situations. Publication of the book Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of Emerging Practice. This book contains a series of case studies related with use of open data as pedagogical materials. The authors of this chapters are academics and practitioners who have been using open data in different educational scenarios and the cases present different dynamics and approaches for the use of open data in the classroom. Involvement in the POERUP policy project and the OpenMed project, aimed at opening up teaching and learning resources in the southern Mediterranean countries – in partnership with UniMed Rome. Organisation of a pre-Open Data Day event at UCL,  which was round table to discuss challenges and opportunities of the use of open data as teaching and learning resources with a group of expert  and practitioners  and with the Latin American Open Data Initiative. We also organised a course for academics on Open Data as Open Educational Resources with the support of the Open Education Unit of the Universidad de la República Uruguay in partnership with A Scuola di OpenCoesione. The outcome of the course can be read in the blog Putting research into practice: Training academics to use Open Data as OER: An experience from Uruguay. In regards with campaigning we have worked with Communia in support for their rightcopyright.eu campaign for better education, aimed at collecting petitions from educators throughout Europe to let the European Parliamentarians know we need a better copyright for education. You can read more about it in this blog. Our blog at https://education.okfn.org/blog reflects the current state of the arts in Open Education around the world. We have blog posts from Croatia, Sweden, Brazil, Scotland, Finland, Germany, Italy and Spain on different topics, from Open Educational Resources Toolkits, Open Education Policy, Open Data and Open Education  Research. In our forum we have spaces for different communities of practice to interact, exchange and discuss. You can join the discussion through: https://discuss.okfn.org/c/working-groups/open-education At the moment we are supporting the 101openstories, a collaborative project led by a group of Open Practitioners aimed at collecting stories and ideas of openness from educators, researchers and learners in general. Also, we are supporting the development of local Open Education Working Groups such as the Italian network of Open Educators, who met recently in Bologna to discuss an agenda to promote and enhance open education accross all the educational sectors in Italy (read more). In this Year of Open we will be participating in a series of events and congresses, including the Latin American Open Data Conference in Costa Rica in August, Con Datos and the OER congress in Slovenia in September. Also, we have joined the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data towards collaborating with different initiatives towards improving Open Data literacies. We are always open to collaborations and willing to support innovative projects on Open Education. If you would like to get in touch with us, you will find us on twitter as @okfnedu or via email at okfn.edu@gmail.com.

Half of the world languages are dying really fast – how you can save yours

Subhashish Panigrahi - July 4, 2017 in open-education

Languages are a gateway to knowledge. How can digital tools be used to help native language speakers access and contribute knowledge? In this blog, Subhashish Panigrahi shows how endangered languages can be documented and preserved using open standards and tools. The world’s knowledge that have been accumulated and coded over ages in different languages are valuable to learn about others’ cultures, traditions, and everything about their life. But not every language is not privileged to be a language of knowledge and governance. Almost half of the 6909 living languages of the world will be vanishing in a century’s time. The most linguistically diverse places like Papua New Guinea are also the most dangerous places for languages. Every two weeks, a language dies and with it a wealth of knowledge forever. In my home country India alone, there exist more than 780 languages. The rate in which languages are dying here is extremely high as over 220 languages from India have died in the last 50 years, and 197 languages from the country are identified as endangered by UNESCO.

Word cloud depicting several Indian languages in their native scripts

With these languages dying, there die all that knowledge that is preserved in those languages. Languages that do not have tools for everyone to access knowledge and contribute to often go out of use. India for example is home to the highest number of visually impaired and illiterate people in the entire world: more than 15 million Indians are visually impaired and 30% are illiterate. But there do not exist many digital accessibility tools either for web or mobile, even though there are about 450-465 million internet users and 60% of them are mobile users. In fact, accessibility tools for most Indian languages are not affordable and are proprietary in nature.
There have been some efforts by the Indian government—like the Central Institute of Indian Languages (CIIL)—to grow the 22 officially recognized languages and some of indigenous languages. Founded in 1969, CIIL has been working to deepen research on Indian languages, and a program called “Protection and Preservation of Endangered Languages of India” was introduced in 2014 to help CIIL specifically to begin several projects for the conservation of endangered languages. Only 10-30% of India’s population can understand English, which is predominantly the language of the Internet. A recent report that was published by Google and KPMG states that more than 70% of the India’s Internet users trust content in their native language over English. The lack of native language content and the lack of electronic accessibility tools therefore plays an important factor in stopping a large number of people from accessing information and contributing to the knowledge commons. When confronted with a problem of this magnitude, there are a few vital things that must be to done to preserve and grow dying languages. Creation of audio-visual documentation of some of the most important socio-cultural aspects of the language such as storytelling, folk literature, oral culture and history is a start. When done by native language speakers, along with annotations of the same in done in a widely-spoken language such as English or Hindi, it is one way of creating digital resources in a language. These resources can be used to create content and linguistic tools to grow the languages’ reach. Sadly, there is little focus from the central government on many of these languages, but there are some effort from several organisations to document native languages. There is something every single individual that speaks a less-spoken language or is in contact with a native speaker of an endangered/indigenous language can do. Languages that are dying need digital activism to grow educational and accessibility tools.That can happen when more public and open repositories like dictionaries, pronunciation libraries, and audio-visual content are created.

Wiki Weekend Tirana 2016 (photo: Anxhelo Lushka)

However, not many people know how to contribute in a form that can used by others to grow resources in a language. Especially in India, contributing to a language is largely skewed by the notion of producing and promoting literature. But in a country where more than 30% of the population is illiterate and a large number of languages are spoken languages (without a written counterpart), it is important that the language content is predominantly audio-visual and not just text-based. More importantly, there is a need for openness so that the whole idea of growing languages does not get jeopardized by proprietary methods and standards.

There are plenty of things anyone can contribute for documenting a language depending on their own skillset.

Every language has a wealth of oral literature, which is the most crucial thing to document for a dying language. Several cultural aspects like folk storytelling, folk songs, other narratives like cooking, local festival celebration, performing art forms and so on can be documented in audio-visual forms. Thanks to cheaper smartphones and an ocean of free and open source software, anyone can now record audio, take pictures and shoot videos in really good quality without spending anything on gears. There are open toolkits that aggregate open source tools, educational resources and sample datasets that one can modify and use for their own language.

A home recording setup for the Kathabhidhana project (photo: Subhashish Panigrahi)

In the age of AI and IoT, one can indeed build resources that will enable their languages to be more user friendly. As explained earlier, most screen reader software that the visually impaired or illiterate people would use do not exist because of the lack of good quality text-to-speech engines. Creating pronunciation libraries of words in a language can help a lot in building both text-to-speech and speech to text engines that eventually can better the screen readers and other electronic accessibility solutions. Cross-language open source tools like LinguaLibre, Kathabhidhana, and Pronuncify help record large number of pronunciations. Similarly, for languages with an alphabet, educational resources for language learning can be created with open source tools like Poly and OpenWords. Building these resources might not result in transforming the state of many endangered languages quickly but will certainly help in gradually bettering the way many people access knowledge in their language. The work of some of the groundbreaking initiatives like the Global Language Hotspots by the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages and National Geographic can be used to start language documentation projects. But it is always recommended to make the work output available with open standards so that others can build solutions on the top of existing interventions. However, there is not much about the actual outcome of any government-led activities for endangered language documentations, and especially if there is any open access to the published works. “People’s Linguistic Survey of India” (PLSI), a non-government-led survey was being conducted during 2012-13 in the leadership of Ganesh Devy. A few years back, Gregory Anderson, founder of Living Tongues, and Prof. K. David Harrison, associate professor of Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, US discovered a hidden language called Koro spoken in Arunanchal Pradesh. In 2014, Marie Wilcox, the last living speaker Wukchumni, a North American language, created a dictionary to keep her language alive. Imagine, where these languages would have ended up if Anderson and Harrison, and Marie did not take these baby steps back then.

Right to Education Index 2016 Data Now Live!

Ally Krupar - April 20, 2017 in open-education

RESULTS Educational Fund and Open Knowledge International are pleased to present the 2016 data from the Right to Education Index (RTEI), a global accountability initiative that aims to ensure that all people, everywhere, enjoy the right to a quality education. RTEI is an action research project using a monitoring tool based on international human rights law and collecting data about the right to education with national civil society organizations in 15 countries in 2016. Civil society organizations, advocates, researchers, and policy makers then use the data in national advocacy campaigns and to better understand national satisfaction of the right to education. The resulting data is now available at www.rtei.org. RTEI 2016 collected data with civil society partners in 15 countries: Civil society partners completed the RTEI Questionnaire. Their findings were peer reviewed by two national independent researchers and provided to government officials for their feedback and comments. The Questionnaire consists of five themes (Governance, Availability, Accessibility, Acceptability, and Adaptability, see link). Index scores are derived by the average of theme scores. Theme scores are an average of subtheme scores, which are calculated by averaging representative data points. Unique values are also calculated to account for:
  • Missing data;
  • National minimum standards concerning pupil-per-classroom, pupil-per-trained teacher, pupil-per-toilet, and pupil-per-textbook ratios;
  • Disaggregated outcome and enrollment data by gender, rural and urban disparity, income quintiles, and disability status;
  • Progressively realized rights weighted by GDP per capita purchasing power parity (PPP).
Further information about calculations is available on rtei.org and will be detailed in a forthcoming RTEI technical brief. The resulting data for 2016 is now available at www.rtei.org. In 2016, RTEI found that Australia, Canada, and the UK had the most robust framework for the right to education across the five themes represented in RTEI; Governance, Availability, Accessibility, Acceptability, and Adaptability. Each theme is made up of subthemes specifically referenced in the international right to education framework. Australia’s, Canada’s, and the UK’s scores were highest on Availability, reflecting the infrastructure and resources of schools, including textbooks, sanitation, classrooms, and pupil-per-trained teacher ratios. On the Index’s other end, Chile, the DRC, and Zimbabwe struggled to satisfy indicators monitored in RTEI 2016. These countries had low Acceptability or Adaptability scores, signifying weaker education systems and difficulty addressing progressively realized rights, such as the rights of children with disabilities. For all RTEI 2016 participating countries, the lowest scoring theme was Adaptability, focused on education for children with disabilities, out-of-school children, and out-of-school educational opportunities. Outside of Adaptability indicators, the Classrooms subtheme had the lowest average score of all Availability subthemes across all countries because of the lack of infrastructure data available in RTEI 2016 and high pupil-per-classroom ratios in several countries. RTEI 2016 also included an analysis of education financing given increase attention to equitable resource allocation and access worldwide.

Research to Action

In 2017, RTEI enters the advocacy phase of data application. In January 2017, RESULTS Educational Fund invited ten current RTEI partners from the Global South to submit proposals to implement in-country advocacy strategies in 2017 using RTEI 2016 findings.  RESULTS and RTEI Advisory Group members reviewed applications and selected the following five RTEI 2017 Advocacy Partners:
  1. Honduras –  Foro Dakar will use data collected in RTEI 2016 related to SDG 4 to focus on national education sector planning, discrimination, and monitoring progress towards SDG 4.
  2. Indonesia – New Indonesia will use data about teacher quality and education for children with disabilities to implement strategies focused on improving national training programs related to inclusive education to further the right to education.
  3. Palestine – Teacher Creativity Center (TCC) will use data related to SDG 4 to measure progress towards SDG 4 through shadow reporting to UNESCO, the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to education, the Ministry of Education in Palestine, and local media.
  4. Tanzania – HakiElimu will use data specifically about girls’ education and inclusive education to focus advocacy on evidence-based policies that promote girls’ education, inclusive, and quality education.
  5. Zimbabwe – Education Coalition of Zimbabwe (ECOZI) will highlight RTEI 2016 findings about continued use of corporal punishment in schools to develop and disseminate alternative policy on positive discipline in schools, training Parliamentarians on corporal punishment issues, and submitting policy recommendations on corporal punishment and free education.
RESULTS and other RTEI partners look forward to supporting these advocacy strategies throughout 2017. Be on the lookout for in-country advocacy updates from our partners posted on www.rtei.org.

Launch: Jedeschule.de promotes transparency within the educational system in Germany

Open Knowledge Foundation Deutschland - April 12, 2017 in OK Germany, Open Knowledge Network, open-education

This blog was written by Moritz Neujeffski, School of Data Germany team.

School of Data Germany, a project by Open Knowledge Foundation Deutschland, helps non-profit organisations, civil rights defenders and activists to understand and use data and technology effectively to increase their impact on societal challenges. Profound knowledge in processing data allows individuals and organisations to critically reflect and to influence public debates with evidence-based arguments. Jedeschule.de is the outcome of our first partnership with BildungsCent eV. Together we explored the programs schools in Germany offer students beside general lessons and advocated for a transparent German education system. While we definitely learned a lot about the school system in Germany, we provided specially tailored Workshops for BildungsCent eV. We addressed how to clean, analyse and visualise data and what pitfalls to look out for in digital projects. Education is more than school lessons. Character and drive often develop outside the classroom. Public information on schools in Germany is sparse and not often available in a structured and organised format. Together with BildungsCent eV., we investigated the availability and access of data on schools in Germany.
The focus of our investigation: How is data on schools best communicated to the public? How does that affect the potential of schools to be important social hubs?

Findings of our analysis: Jedeschule.de

Parents, students, teachers, politicians, and civil society organisations benefit from enhanced information on the German school system that is provided on Jedeschule.de. School of Data Germany and BildungsCent eV. campaigned for more transparency in the educational sector and promoted dialogues between stakeholders in educational policy.We also provided an overview of more than 30,000 schools of general education in Germany. The interactive map makes it possible to search for and filter according to specific school types. The educational sector differs among the 16 German federal states. We gathered information on the development of each individual school system, public spending within the educational sector, and the employment situation of teachers for each state. Moreover,  3,000 profiles for schools in Berlin and Saxony containing their mission statements, the number of students and teachers per school, study groups and cooperations between schools and actors from civil society, public departments, the private sector and other relevant stakeholders were set up. All this data as used in the project is available as open data on our website.

Our aim is to facilitate the use of educational data by journalists, politicians, scientists, the civic tech community, and stakeholders of educational policy.

Concluding remarks on school activities & cooperations in Berlin and Saxony

  •  413 out of 800 general education schools in Berlin communicate their activities to the Ministry of Education, Youth and Family.
  • On average, they provide eight activities in at least four areas such as environment, literature, handcraft, and technology besides regular lessons.
  • In Saxony, 1206 out of 1500 schools of general education report to the statistical office.
  • In total, they offer 11,600 activities. On average, this amounts to ten activities in five different areas per school.
  • Sporting activities are most prominent in both federal states. Partners from civil society and public affairs are the highest among schools in both states.
Schools promote the well-being and development of children and adolescents through diverse projects, partners, and activities. They are an important component of the livelihood and learning environment of students and provide an important perspective on society. To establish a holistic picture of the German school system and to increase transparency and the ability to compare federal states on educational matters, data has to be better collected, organised, and structured at the state level. Administrations, especially need to improve their performance in order to foster an effective debate on the German school system.  

Open Education per il cambiamento sociale: seminario domani a Bologna!

Francesca De Chiara - March 21, 2017 in Open Data, open-education

Pubblichiamo a nome dei nostri amici e coordinatori del gruppo Open Education Working Group Domani, 23 Marzo, a Bologna, presso la sede del TIM#WCap in Via Guglielmo Oberdan, 22, si terrà il seminario “Educazione aperta per il cambiamento sociale in Italia” dalle ore 10.00 alle 16.00. Questo seminario nasce dalla necessità – emersa durante alcuni eventi che sono stati […]

Open Education Kickoff Meeting

driesvr - February 21, 2017 in Open Data, Open Knowledge, open-education, universities

Belgium is lacking behind when it comes to opening up their educational data. Therefore some bottom-up action is needed in order to make this possible. As a response, an interesting Kickoff meeting about Open Education was held on February 15 2017 in Brussels. Data providers, data re-users and data facilitators were sitting together and discussed the possibilities regarding open educational resources (OER) and open educational practices. What’s the problem? Students and staff want information which is up-to-date and easy to find. This can be brought by applications. The only problem is that most colleges aren’t keen to open up their data, whereas opening their data to build applications would make things a lot easier for students as well as for the colleges itself. It would change both institutional and wider culture. Another problem lies in the fact that every institution works with a different database. Therefore it is also interesting to discuss about an open data standard for every college or university. How can we solve this? Organizations need concrete information about what data they have to open and its consequences. Therefore this working group can help to discuss the possibilities op Open Education to create some extra pressure to colleges and universities. Do you want to be part of the Open Education Working group? Are you interested or do you want to be part of the Open Education Working Group? Click here to join our Slack group and keep the discussion alive.

Verkko-opiskelusta vauhtia datan avaamiseen

eija - December 15, 2016 in avoin data, Finished projects, koulutus, mooc, open-education

avoin-data-logoJulkishallinnon datan avaajan mestarikurssi, joka alkoi lokakuussa ja päättyi marras-joulukuun taitteessa, on tuottanut hyvää satoa. Kurssin suoritti kuudestatoista organisaatiosta yhteensä 92 henkilöä, jotka laativat omalle organisaatiolleen suunnitelman datan avaamisesta ja siitä tiedottamisesta. Monet kurssilaiset esittivät myös otteen avaamastaan datasta ja korjasivat sitä saamansa palautteen mukaisesti. Kurssin aikana Musiikkiarkisto JAPA julkaisi avaamansa Mihin jäi punk -muistitietoaineiston, Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti kotimaisten televisiosarjojen tietoja ja Liikenteen turvallisuusvirasto Trafi Ilma-alusrekisterin ja Rautateiden kalustorekisterin tietoja. Eduskunta avasi rajapinnan järjestelmistään koottuun avoimeen dataan, joissa on tietoja kansanedustajista, valtiopäiväasiakirjojen lausunnoista sekä äänestyksistä ja sali-istunnoista. Lähiaikoina Turun kaupunki avaa ja julkistaa liikuntapaikkojen kävijämäärätietoja ja Postimuseo tietoja Suomen postitoimipaikoista perustamis- ja mahdollisine lakkauttamistietoineen sekä toimipaikan hoitajista vuoteen 1916 asti. Kansallisarkistosta kurssilla oli monta ryhmää. Yksi niistä laati luonnoksen Kansallisarkiston avoimuuspolitiikasta, joka on parhaillaan kommentoitavana. Kun se valmistuu, myös muut muistiorganisaatiot voisivat ottaa sen käyttöönsä soveltuvin osin. Hyödyntäkää uusia avauksia – vaikka DataBusiness Challengessa! Julkishallinnon datan avaajan mestarikurssin verkkototeutuksen, ns. cMOOCin eli yhteisöllisen MOOCin (Massive Open Online Course) järjesti Open Knowledge Finland ry yhteistyössä Finnish Consulting Groupin (FCG) kanssa. Syksyn 2016 kurssin rahoitti Valtiokonttori. Kurssiaineiston kehittämisessä on tehty yhteistyötä opetus- ja kulttuuriministeriön, liikenne- ja viestintäministeriön, Aalto-yliopiston sekä Maailmanpankkiryhmän kanssa. Lisätietoja: eija.kalliala (at) okf.fi The post Verkko-opiskelusta vauhtia datan avaamiseen appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Verkko-opiskelusta vauhtia datan avaamiseen

eija - December 15, 2016 in avoin data, koulutus, mooc, open-education

avoin-data-logoJulkishallinnon datan avaajan mestarikurssi, joka alkoi lokakuussa ja päättyi marras-joulukuun taitteessa, on tuottanut hyvää satoa. Kurssin suoritti kuudestatoista organisaatiosta yhteensä 92 henkilöä, jotka laativat omalle organisaatiolleen suunnitelman datan avaamisesta ja siitä tiedottamisesta. Monet kurssilaiset esittivät myös otteen avaamastaan datasta ja korjasivat sitä saamansa palautteen mukaisesti. Kurssin aikana Musiikkiarkisto JAPA julkaisi avaamansa Mihin jäi punk -muistitietoaineiston, Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti KAVI kotimaisten televisiosarjojen tietoja ja Liikenteen turvallisuusvirasto Trafi Ilma-alusrekisterin ja Rautateiden kalustorekisterin tietoja. Eduskunta avasi rajapinnan järjestelmistään koottuun avoimeen dataan, joissa on tietoja kansanedustajista, valtiopäiväasiakirjojen lausunnoista sekä äänestyksistä ja sali-istunnoista. Lähiaikoina Turun kaupunki avaa ja julkistaa liikuntapaikkojen kävijämäärätietoja ja Postimuseo tietoja Suomen postitoimipaikoista perustamis- ja mahdollisine lakkauttamistietoineen sekä toimipaikan hoitajista vuoteen 1916 asti. Kansallisarkistosta kurssilla oli monta ryhmää. Yksi niistä laati luonnoksen Kansallisarkiston avoimuuspolitiikasta, joka on parhaillaan kommentoitavana. Kun se valmistuu, myös muut muistiorganisaatiot voisivat ottaa sen käyttöönsä soveltuvin osin. Hyödyntäkää uusia avauksia – vaikka DataBusiness Challengessa! Julkishallinnon datan avaajan mestarikurssin verkkototeutuksen, ns. cMOOCin eli yhteisöllisen MOOCin (Massive Open Online Course) järjesti Open Knowledge Finland ry yhteistyössä Finnish Consulting Groupin (FCG) kanssa. Syksyn 2016 kurssin rahoitti Valtiokonttori. Kurssiaineiston kehittämisessä on tehty yhteistyötä opetus- ja kulttuuriministeriön, liikenne- ja viestintäministeriön, Aalto-yliopiston sekä Maailmanpankkiryhmän kanssa. Lisätietoja: eija.kalliala (at) okf.fi The post Verkko-opiskelusta vauhtia datan avaamiseen appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Verkko-opiskelusta vauhtia datan avaamiseen

eija - December 15, 2016 in avoin data, koulutus, mooc, open-education

avoin-data-logoJulkishallinnon datan avaajan mestarikurssi, joka alkoi lokakuussa ja päättyi marras-joulukuun taitteessa, on tuottanut hyvää satoa. Kurssin suoritti kuudestatoista organisaatiosta yhteensä 92 henkilöä, jotka laativat omalle organisaatiolleen suunnitelman datan avaamisesta ja siitä tiedottamisesta. Monet kurssilaiset esittivät myös otteen avaamastaan datasta ja korjasivat sitä saamansa palautteen mukaisesti. Kurssin aikana Musiikkiarkisto JAPA julkaisi avaamansa Mihin jäi punk -muistitietoaineiston, Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti KAVI kotimaisten televisiosarjojen tietoja ja Liikenteen turvallisuusvirasto Trafi Ilma-alusrekisterin ja Rautateiden kalustorekisterin tietoja. Eduskunta avasi rajapinnan järjestelmistään koottuun avoimeen dataan, joissa on tietoja kansanedustajista, valtiopäiväasiakirjojen lausunnoista sekä äänestyksistä ja sali-istunnoista. Lähiaikoina Turun kaupunki avaa ja julkistaa liikuntapaikkojen kävijämäärätietoja ja Postimuseo tietoja Suomen postitoimipaikoista perustamis- ja mahdollisine lakkauttamistietoineen sekä toimipaikan hoitajista vuoteen 1916 asti. Kansallisarkistosta kurssilla oli monta ryhmää. Yksi niistä laati luonnoksen Kansallisarkiston avoimuuspolitiikasta, joka on parhaillaan kommentoitavana. Kun se valmistuu, myös muut muistiorganisaatiot voisivat ottaa sen käyttöönsä soveltuvin osin. Hyödyntäkää uusia avauksia – vaikka DataBusiness Challengessa! Julkishallinnon datan avaajan mestarikurssin verkkototeutuksen, ns. cMOOCin eli yhteisöllisen MOOCin (Massive Open Online Course) järjesti Open Knowledge Finland ry yhteistyössä Finnish Consulting Groupin (FCG) kanssa. Syksyn 2016 kurssin rahoitti Valtiokonttori. Kurssiaineiston kehittämisessä on tehty yhteistyötä opetus- ja kulttuuriministeriön, liikenne- ja viestintäministeriön, Aalto-yliopiston sekä Maailmanpankkiryhmän kanssa. Lisätietoja: eija.kalliala (at) okf.fi The post Verkko-opiskelusta vauhtia datan avaamiseen appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.