You are browsing the archive for Open Government Data.

Europe’s proposed PSI Directive: A good baseline for future open data policies?

Danny Lämmerhirt - June 21, 2018 in eu, licence, Open Data, Open Government Data, Open Standards, Policy, PSI, research

Some weeks ago, the European Commission proposed an update of the PSI Directive**. The PSI Directive regulates the reuse of public sector information (including administrative government data), and has important consequences for the development of Europe’s open data policies. Like every legislative proposal, the PSI Directive proposal is open for public feedback until July 13. In this blog post Open Knowledge International presents what we think are necessary improvements to make the PSI Directive fit for Europe’s Digital Single Market.    In a guest blogpost Ton Zijlstra outlined the changes to the PSI Directive. Another blog post by Ton Zijlstra and Katleen Janssen helps to understand the historical background and puts the changes into context. Whilst improvements are made, we think the current proposal is a missed opportunity, does not support the creation of a Digital Single Market and can pose risks for open data. In what follows, we recommend changes to the European Parliament and the European Council. We also discuss actions civil society may take to engage with the directive in the future, and explain the reasoning behind our recommendations.

Recommendations to improve the PSI Directive

Based on our assessment, we urge the European Parliament and the Council to amend the proposed PSI Directive to ensure the following:
  • When defining high-value datasets, the PSI Directive should not rule out data generated under market conditions. A stronger requirement must be added to Article 13 to make assessments of economic costs transparent, and weigh them against broader societal benefits.
  • The public must have access to the methods, meeting notes, and consultations to define high value data. Article 13 must ensure that the public will be able to participate in this definition process to gather multiple viewpoints and limit the risks of biased value assessments.
  • Beyond tracking proposals for high-value datasets in the EU’s Interinstitutional Register of Delegated Acts, the public should be able to suggest new delegated acts for high-value datasets.  
  • The PSI Directive must make clear what “standard open licences” are, by referencing the Open Definition, and explicitly recommending the adoption of Open Definition compliant licences (from Creative Commons and Open Data Commons) when developing new open data policies. The directive should give preference to public domain dedication and attribution licences in accordance with the LAPSI 2.0 licensing guidelines.
  • Government of EU member states that already have policies on specific licences in use should be required to add legal compatibility tests with other open licences to these policies. We suggest to follow the recommendations outlined in the LAPSI 2.0 resources to run such compatibility tests.
  • High-value datasets must be reusable with the least restrictions possible, subject at most to requirements that preserve provenance and openness. Currently the European Commission risks to create use silos if governments will be allowed to add “any restrictions on re-use” to the use terms of high-value datasets.  
  • Publicly funded undertakings should only be able to charge marginal costs.
  • Public undertakings, publicly funded research facilities and non-executive government branches should be required to publish data referenced in the PSI Directive.

Conformant licences according to the Open Definition, opendefinition.org/licenses

Our recommendations do not pose unworkable requirements or disproportionately high administrative burden, but are essential to realise the goals of the PSI directive with regards to:
  1. Increasing the amount of public sector data available to the public for re-use,
  2. Harmonising the conditions for non-discrimination, and re-use in the European market,
  3. Ensuring fair competition and easy access to markets based on public sector information,
  4. Enhancing cross-border innovation, and an internal market where Union-wide services can be created to support the European data economy.

Our recommendations, explained: What would the proposed PSI Directive mean for the future of open data?

Publication of high-value data

The European Commission proposes to define a list of ‘high value datasets’ that shall be published under the terms of the PSI Directive. This includes to publish datasets in machine-readable formats, under standard open licences, in many cases free of charge, except when high-value datasets are collected by public undertakings in environments where free access to data would distort competition. “High value datasets” are defined as documents that bring socio-economic benefits, “notably because of their suitability for the creation of value-added services and applications, and the number of potential beneficiaries of the value-added services and applications based on these datasets”. The EC also makes reference to existing high value datasets, such as the list of key data defined by the G8 Open Data Charter. Identifying high-quality data poses at least three problems:
  1. High-value datasets may be unusable in a digital Single Market: The EC may “define other applicable modalities”, such as “any conditions for re-use”. There is a risk that a list of EU-wide high value datasets also includes use restrictions violating the Open Definition. Given that a list of high value datasets will be transposed by all member states, adding “any conditions” may significantly hinder the reusability and ability to combine datasets.
  2. Defining value of data is not straightforward. Recent papers, from Oxford University, to Open Data Watch and the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data demonstrate disagreement what data’s “value” is. What counts as high value data should not only be based on quantitative indicators such as growth indicators, numbers of apps or numbers of beneficiaries, but use qualitative assessments and expert judgement from multiple disciplines.
  3. Public deliberation and participation is key to define high value data and to avoid biased value assessments. Impact assessments and cost-benefit calculations come with their own methodical biases, and can unfairly favour data with economic value at the expense of fuzzier social benefits. Currently, the PSI Directive does not consider data created under market conditions to be considered high value data if this would distort market conditions. We recommend that the PSI Directive adds a stronger requirement to weigh economic costs against societal benefits, drawing from multiple assessment methods (see point 2). The criteria, methods, and processes to determine high value must be transparent and accessible to the broader public to enable the public to negotiate benefits and to reflect the viewpoints of many stakeholders.

Expansion of scope

The new PSI Directive takes into account data from “public undertakings”. This includes services in the general interest entrusted with entities outside of the public sector, over which government maintains a high degree of control. The PSI Directive also includes data from non-executive government branches (i.e. from legislative and judiciary branches of governments), as well as data from publicly funded research. Opportunities and challenges include:
  • None of the data holders which are planned to be included in the PSI Directive are obliged to publish data. It is at their discretion to publish data. Only in case they want to publish data, they should follow the guidelines of the proposed PSI directive.
  • The PSI Directive wants to keep administrative costs low. All above mentioned data sectors are exempt from data access requests.
  • In summary, the proposed PSI Directive leaves too much space for individual choice to publish data and has no “teeth”. To accelerate the publication of general interest data, the PSI Directive should oblige data holders to publish data. Waiting several years to make the publication of this data mandatory, as happened with the first version of the PSI Directive risks to significantly hamper the availability of key data, important for the acceleration of growth in Europe’s data economy.    
  • For research data in particular, only data that is already published should fall under the new directive. Even though the PSI Directive will require member states to develop open access policies, the implementation thereof should be built upon the EU’s recommendations for open access.

Legal incompatibilities may jeopardise the Digital Single Market

Most notably, the proposed PSI Directive does not address problems around licensing which are a major impediment for Europe’s Digital Single Market. Europe’s data economy can only benefit from open data if licence terms are standardised. This allows data from different member states to be combined without legal issues, and enables to combine datasets, create cross-country applications, and spark innovation. Europe’s licensing ecosystem is a patchwork of many (possibly conflicting) terms, creating use silos and legal uncertainty. But the current proposal does not only speak vaguely about standard open licences, and makes national policies responsible to add “less restrictive terms than those outlined in the PSI Directive”. It also contradicts its aim to smoothen the digital Single Market encouraging the creation of bespoke licences, suggesting that governments may add new licence terms with regards to real-time data publication. Currently the PSI Directive would allow the European Commission to add “any conditions for re-use” to high-value datasets, thereby encouraging to create legal incompatibilities (see Article 13 (4.a)). We strongly recommend that the PSI Directive draws on the EU co-funded LAPSI 2.0 recommendations to understand licence incompatibilities and ensure a compatible open licence ecosystem.   I’d like to thank Pierre Chrzanowksi, Mika Honkanen, Susanna Ånäs, and Sander van der Waal for their thoughtful comments while writing this blogpost.   Image adapted from Max Pixel   ** Its’ official name is the Directive 2003/98/EC on the reuse of public sector information.

Europe’s proposed PSI Directive: A good baseline for future open data policies?

Danny Lämmerhirt - June 21, 2018 in eu, licence, Open Data, Open Government Data, Open Standards, Policy, PSI, research

Some weeks ago, the European Commission proposed an update of the PSI Directive**. The PSI Directive regulates the reuse of public sector information (including administrative government data), and has important consequences for the development of Europe’s open data policies. Like every legislative proposal, the PSI Directive proposal is open for public feedback until July 13. In this blog post Open Knowledge International presents what we think are necessary improvements to make the PSI Directive fit for Europe’s Digital Single Market.    In a guest blogpost Ton Zijlstra outlined the changes to the PSI Directive. Another blog post by Ton Zijlstra and Katleen Janssen helps to understand the historical background and puts the changes into context. Whilst improvements are made, we think the current proposal is a missed opportunity, does not support the creation of a Digital Single Market and can pose risks for open data. In what follows, we recommend changes to the European Parliament and the European Council. We also discuss actions civil society may take to engage with the directive in the future, and explain the reasoning behind our recommendations.

Recommendations to improve the PSI Directive

Based on our assessment, we urge the European Parliament and the Council to amend the proposed PSI Directive to ensure the following:
  • When defining high-value datasets, the PSI Directive should not rule out data generated under market conditions. A stronger requirement must be added to Article 13 to make assessments of economic costs transparent, and weigh them against broader societal benefits.
  • The public must have access to the methods, meeting notes, and consultations to define high value data. Article 13 must ensure that the public will be able to participate in this definition process to gather multiple viewpoints and limit the risks of biased value assessments.
  • Beyond tracking proposals for high-value datasets in the EU’s Interinstitutional Register of Delegated Acts, the public should be able to suggest new delegated acts for high-value datasets.  
  • The PSI Directive must make clear what “standard open licences” are, by referencing the Open Definition, and explicitly recommending the adoption of Open Definition compliant licences (from Creative Commons and Open Data Commons) when developing new open data policies. The directive should give preference to public domain dedication and attribution licences in accordance with the LAPSI 2.0 licensing guidelines.
  • Government of EU member states that already have policies on specific licences in use should be required to add legal compatibility tests with other open licences to these policies. We suggest to follow the recommendations outlined in the LAPSI 2.0 resources to run such compatibility tests.
  • High-value datasets must be reusable with the least restrictions possible, subject at most to requirements that preserve provenance and openness. Currently the European Commission risks to create use silos if governments will be allowed to add “any restrictions on re-use” to the use terms of high-value datasets.  
  • Publicly funded undertakings should only be able to charge marginal costs.
  • Public undertakings, publicly funded research facilities and non-executive government branches should be required to publish data referenced in the PSI Directive.

Conformant licences according to the Open Definition, opendefinition.org/licenses

Our recommendations do not pose unworkable requirements or disproportionately high administrative burden, but are essential to realise the goals of the PSI directive with regards to:
  1. Increasing the amount of public sector data available to the public for re-use,
  2. Harmonising the conditions for non-discrimination, and re-use in the European market,
  3. Ensuring fair competition and easy access to markets based on public sector information,
  4. Enhancing cross-border innovation, and an internal market where Union-wide services can be created to support the European data economy.

Our recommendations, explained: What would the proposed PSI Directive mean for the future of open data?

Publication of high-value data

The European Commission proposes to define a list of ‘high value datasets’ that shall be published under the terms of the PSI Directive. This includes to publish datasets in machine-readable formats, under standard open licences, in many cases free of charge, except when high-value datasets are collected by public undertakings in environments where free access to data would distort competition. “High value datasets” are defined as documents that bring socio-economic benefits, “notably because of their suitability for the creation of value-added services and applications, and the number of potential beneficiaries of the value-added services and applications based on these datasets”. The EC also makes reference to existing high value datasets, such as the list of key data defined by the G8 Open Data Charter. Identifying high-quality data poses at least three problems:
  1. High-value datasets may be unusable in a digital Single Market: The EC may “define other applicable modalities”, such as “any conditions for re-use”. There is a risk that a list of EU-wide high value datasets also includes use restrictions violating the Open Definition. Given that a list of high value datasets will be transposed by all member states, adding “any conditions” may significantly hinder the reusability and ability to combine datasets.
  2. Defining value of data is not straightforward. Recent papers, from Oxford University, to Open Data Watch and the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data demonstrate disagreement what data’s “value” is. What counts as high value data should not only be based on quantitative indicators such as growth indicators, numbers of apps or numbers of beneficiaries, but use qualitative assessments and expert judgement from multiple disciplines.
  3. Public deliberation and participation is key to define high value data and to avoid biased value assessments. Impact assessments and cost-benefit calculations come with their own methodical biases, and can unfairly favour data with economic value at the expense of fuzzier social benefits. Currently, the PSI Directive does not consider data created under market conditions to be considered high value data if this would distort market conditions. We recommend that the PSI Directive adds a stronger requirement to weigh economic costs against societal benefits, drawing from multiple assessment methods (see point 2). The criteria, methods, and processes to determine high value must be transparent and accessible to the broader public to enable the public to negotiate benefits and to reflect the viewpoints of many stakeholders.

Expansion of scope

The new PSI Directive takes into account data from “public undertakings”. This includes services in the general interest entrusted with entities outside of the public sector, over which government maintains a high degree of control. The PSI Directive also includes data from non-executive government branches (i.e. from legislative and judiciary branches of governments), as well as data from publicly funded research. Opportunities and challenges include:
  • None of the data holders which are planned to be included in the PSI Directive are obliged to publish data. It is at their discretion to publish data. Only in case they want to publish data, they should follow the guidelines of the proposed PSI directive.
  • The PSI Directive wants to keep administrative costs low. All above mentioned data sectors are exempt from data access requests.
  • In summary, the proposed PSI Directive leaves too much space for individual choice to publish data and has no “teeth”. To accelerate the publication of general interest data, the PSI Directive should oblige data holders to publish data. Waiting several years to make the publication of this data mandatory, as happened with the first version of the PSI Directive risks to significantly hamper the availability of key data, important for the acceleration of growth in Europe’s data economy.    
  • For research data in particular, only data that is already published should fall under the new directive. Even though the PSI Directive will require member states to develop open access policies, the implementation thereof should be built upon the EU’s recommendations for open access.

Legal incompatibilities may jeopardise the Digital Single Market

Most notably, the proposed PSI Directive does not address problems around licensing which are a major impediment for Europe’s Digital Single Market. Europe’s data economy can only benefit from open data if licence terms are standardised. This allows data from different member states to be combined without legal issues, and enables to combine datasets, create cross-country applications, and spark innovation. Europe’s licensing ecosystem is a patchwork of many (possibly conflicting) terms, creating use silos and legal uncertainty. But the current proposal does not only speak vaguely about standard open licences, and makes national policies responsible to add “less restrictive terms than those outlined in the PSI Directive”. It also contradicts its aim to smoothen the digital Single Market encouraging the creation of bespoke licences, suggesting that governments may add new licence terms with regards to real-time data publication. Currently the PSI Directive would allow the European Commission to add “any conditions for re-use” to high-value datasets, thereby encouraging to create legal incompatibilities (see Article 13 (4.a)). We strongly recommend that the PSI Directive draws on the EU co-funded LAPSI 2.0 recommendations to understand licence incompatibilities and ensure a compatible open licence ecosystem.   I’d like to thank Pierre Chrzanowksi, Mika Honkanen, Susanna Ånäs, and Sander van der Waal for their thoughtful comments while writing this blogpost.   Image adapted from Max Pixel   ** Its’ official name is the Directive 2003/98/EC on the reuse of public sector information.

Open Council Data of more than 100 Dutch municipalities reused in app WhereGovernment

Open State Foundation - March 7, 2018 in netherlands, open council data, Open Data, Open Geodata, Open Government Data

This blog has been reposted from the Open State Foundation blog. More than a hundred Dutch municipalities release Open Council Data, including all documents of the municipal council – decisions, agendas, motions, amendments and policy documents – easily and collectively accessible. The data is now available for reuse in applications. Recently, the first app that reuses the data, WhereGovernment, was launched. 

Strengthen local democracy

Citizens, entrepreneurs, journalists, civil servants, journalists, scientists and all other interested parties can use Open Council Data to check easily what is going on in municipalities around a specific theme. Rural, regional, by municipality or even by neighborhood. In 2015 Open State Foundation, together with the Ministry of the Interior and five municipalities (Heerde, Oude IJsselstreek, Den Helder, Utrecht and Amstelveen), started a pilot to provide access to information as open data. In cooperation with VNG Realisatie and Argu, work was done on standardisation and upscaling. The goal is to strengthen local democracy.

Reusable local government data

The council information was already public, but only available per municipality and often not easy to find or reuse. Of 102 municipalities – including Amsterdam and Utrecht, but also smaller municipalities such as Binnenmaas and Dongen – all council documents can now be found on the Open Council Information website. These documents are available as open data: standardised and reusable. For example, app builders, websites, media and other parties can use and publish the information quickly and easily.

WhereGovernment app

To explore the possibilities of the Open Council Data, VNG Realisatie organised a competition in 2017 to develop the best app: the App Challenge Open Council Information. The first prize went to the webapp WaarOverheid of developer Qollap, which places council information on the map based on the basis of smart algorithms. This allows residents to see what is going on in their neighbourhood – or in a completely different neighbourhood. The app has been further developed with the prize money. From today – in the run-up to the municipal elections of 21 March 2018 – WaarGovernment can be used by everyone. Everything about the app WaarOverheid can be found on waaroverheid.nl.

Gold mine

Robert van Dijk, council clerk of the municipality of Teylingen and chairman of the advisory group Open Council Information, is enthusiastic about the results: ‘We can continue to talk about the theme of open government, but in order to achieve it we have to take action. The information society is a fact. Citizens can access unimaginable information via digital channels, but the government lags behind. And that while we are sitting on a huge amount of data. Society demands transparency from us, we have to get away from the back rooms. This is the instrument for that. In this way we can very effectively strengthen our democracy and make open government and open accountability possible. I see Open Council information as a gold mine. This standardisation is the starting point for upcoming projects and apps. If all municipalities join in later, nobody will have to use information from 380 islands to know which trends are going on. In short: a wonderful project.’ Open Council Information is part of the Digital Agenda 2020 and the Open Government Action Plan of the Netherlands (action point 6) with the Association of Netherlands Municipalities (VNG) in association with Open State Foundation, the driver of the Open Council Information project, and various local authorities and the Ministry of Interior and Kingdom Relations.  

Open Council Data of more than 100 Dutch municipalities reused in app WhereGovernment

Open State Foundation - March 7, 2018 in netherlands, open council data, Open Data, Open Geodata, Open Government Data

This blog has been reposted from the Open State Foundation blog. More than a hundred Dutch municipalities release Open Council Data, including all documents of the municipal council – decisions, agendas, motions, amendments and policy documents – easily and collectively accessible. The data is now available for reuse in applications. Recently, the first app that reuses the data, WhereGovernment, was launched. 

Strengthen local democracy

Citizens, entrepreneurs, journalists, civil servants, journalists, scientists and all other interested parties can use Open Council Data to check easily what is going on in municipalities around a specific theme. Rural, regional, by municipality or even by neighborhood. In 2015 Open State Foundation, together with the Ministry of the Interior and five municipalities (Heerde, Oude IJsselstreek, Den Helder, Utrecht and Amstelveen), started a pilot to provide access to information as open data. In cooperation with VNG Realisatie and Argu, work was done on standardisation and upscaling. The goal is to strengthen local democracy.

Reusable local government data

The council information was already public, but only available per municipality and often not easy to find or reuse. Of 102 municipalities – including Amsterdam and Utrecht, but also smaller municipalities such as Binnenmaas and Dongen – all council documents can now be found on the Open Council Information website. These documents are available as open data: standardised and reusable. For example, app builders, websites, media and other parties can use and publish the information quickly and easily.

WhereGovernment app

To explore the possibilities of the Open Council Data, VNG Realisatie organised a competition in 2017 to develop the best app: the App Challenge Open Council Information. The first prize went to the webapp WaarOverheid of developer Qollap, which places council information on the map based on the basis of smart algorithms. This allows residents to see what is going on in their neighbourhood – or in a completely different neighbourhood. The app has been further developed with the prize money. From today – in the run-up to the municipal elections of 21 March 2018 – WaarGovernment can be used by everyone. Everything about the app WaarOverheid can be found on waaroverheid.nl.

Gold mine

Robert van Dijk, council clerk of the municipality of Teylingen and chairman of the advisory group Open Council Information, is enthusiastic about the results: ‘We can continue to talk about the theme of open government, but in order to achieve it we have to take action. The information society is a fact. Citizens can access unimaginable information via digital channels, but the government lags behind. And that while we are sitting on a huge amount of data. Society demands transparency from us, we have to get away from the back rooms. This is the instrument for that. In this way we can very effectively strengthen our democracy and make open government and open accountability possible. I see Open Council information as a gold mine. This standardisation is the starting point for upcoming projects and apps. If all municipalities join in later, nobody will have to use information from 380 islands to know which trends are going on. In short: a wonderful project.’ Open Council Information is part of the Digital Agenda 2020 and the Open Government Action Plan of the Netherlands (action point 6) with the Association of Netherlands Municipalities (VNG) in association with Open State Foundation, the driver of the Open Council Information project, and various local authorities and the Ministry of Interior and Kingdom Relations.  

The future of the Global Open Data Index: assessing the possibilities

Open Knowledge International - November 1, 2017 in Global Open Data Index, godi, GODI16, Open Government Data, open-government

In the last couple of months we have received questions regarding the status of the new Global Open Data Index (GODI) from a few members of our Network. This blogpost is to update everyone on the status of GODI and what comes next. But first, some context: GODI is one of the biggest assessments of the state of open government data globally, alongside the Web Foundation’s Open Data Barometer. We notice persistent obstacles for open data year-by-year. High-income countries regularly secure top rankings, yet overall there is little to no development in many countries. As our latest State Of Open Government Data in 2017 report shows, data is often not made available publicly at all. If so, we see many issues around findability, quality, processability, and licensing. Individual countries are notable exceptions to the rule. The Open Data Barometer made similar observations in its latest report, mentioning a slow uptake of policy, as well as persistent data quality issues in countries that provide open data. So there is still a lot of work to be done. To resolve issues like engagement with our community, we started to explore alternative paths for GODI. This includes a shift in focus from a mere measurement tool to a stronger conversational device between our user groups throughout the process. We understand that we need to speak to new audiences and focus on measurement as a tool in real world applications. We need to focus more on this. We want to understand the use cases of the Open Data Survey (the tool that powers GODI and the Open Data Census) in different contexts and with different goals. We have barely seen a few of the possible uses of the tool in the open data sphere and we want to see even more. In order to learn more about how GODI is taken up by different user groups, we are also currently exploring GODI’s effects on open data policy and publication. We wish to understand more systematically how individual elements of the GODI interface (such as country ranking, dataset results, discuss forum entries) help mobilising support for open data among different user groups. Our goal is to understand how to improve our survey design and workflow so that they more directly support action around open data policy and publication. In addition we are developing a new vision for the Open Data Index to either measure open data on a regional and city-level or by topical areas. We will elaborate on this vision in a follow-up blogpost soon. Taking this all into account, we have decided to focus on working on the aforementioned use cases and a regional Index during 2018. In the meantime, we will still work with our community to define a vision that will make GODI a sustainable measurement tool: we understand that tracking the changes in government data publication is crucial for the activists and governments themselves. We know that progress around open data is slower than we would like it to be, but therefore we need to ensure that discussions around open data do not end. Please do not hesitate to submit new discussions around country entries on our forum or reach out to us if you have any ideas on how to take GODI forwards and improve. If you’re running an Open Data Census, we we’ll continue giving you support in the measurement you’re currently working on, whether it’s local, regional or you have any new idea of a Census you’d like to try. If you want to run your own Census, you can request it here, or send an email to index@okfn.org to see how we could collaborate further.

Kiista eduskunnan vierailijatiedoista kirvoitti Lobbaus läpinäkyväksi -kansalaisaloitteen

Open Knowledge Finland - October 14, 2017 in avoimuus, avoimuusrekisteri, avoin eduskunta, citizen initiative, demokratia, eduskunta, Featured, Freedom of Information, kansalaisaloite, lobbarirekisteri, lobbaus, lobbaus läpinäkyväksi, lobbausrekisteri, lobby registry, Nofications, Open Democracy, Open Government Data, parliament, projects, riksdagen, vaikuttaminen, vierailijatiedot

Tiedote. Julkaistu: 13.10.2017, 09:00

Open Knowledge Finland ry

Kansalaisjärjestöt Open Knowledge Finland, Avoin ministeriö ja Transparency Finland käynnistävät kansalaisaloitteen, joka loisi ensimmäistä kertaa lobbausrekisterin Suomeen. Lobbaus läpinäkyväksi -aloite tähtää kansanedustajien työn avoimuuden lisäämiseen eduskunnan työjärjestystä muuttamalla. (Suora linkki allekirjoitukseen>> Kansalaisaloite loisi yhteiset käytännöt kansanedustajien sidosryhmätapaamisten julkistamiseen, mutta suojaisi tavallisten kansalaisten yksityisyyden. “Vaikuttamistyö eli lobbaaminen kuuluu demokratiaan, mutta salailu ei ole nykypäivää. Esimerkiksi tuorein eduskunnan kansliatoimikunnan päätös säilyttää vierailijatiedot yhden päivän ajan on aivan riittämätön”, sanoo Open Knowledge Finlandin toiminnanjohtaja Teemu Ropponen. Lobbausrekisterissä ilmoitettaisiin kansanedustajien kaikki tapaamiset ja tiedot kuten osallistuneiden nimet, taustayhteisöt ja toimeksiantajat. Myös tapaamiseen liittyvä aineisto tulisi julkiseksi. Lisäksi jo olemassa oleva kansanedustajien sidonnaisuusrekisteri sekä valtiopäiväasiakirjat olisivat saatavilla kansalaisille avoimena tietona. “Eduskunnan pitäisi maamme ylintä valtaa käyttävänä tahona näyttää avoimuudessa esimerkkiä muulle julkishallinnolle. Aloitteemme on askel kattavampaan muutokseen. Uskomme lobbausrekisterin lisäävän luottamusta poliittisen järjestelmän ja tukevan laajempaa osallistumista päätöksiin”, toteaa puheenjohtaja Joonas Pekkanen Avoimesta ministeriöstä. Tutkimus osoittaa avoimuuden tarpeen Open Knowledge Finland tutki eduskunnan vierailijatietoja yhteensä 24 500 vierailusta 11 kuukauden ajalta vuoden 2016 toukokuusta vuoden 2017 huhtikuuhun. Tutkimuksen otoksessa elinkeinoelämän etujärjestöjen eduskuntavierailuista noin kolme neljäsosaa on kytköksissä hallituspuolueisiin. Muiden etujärjestöjen edustajat tapaavat useimmin oppositiota ja käyvät eduskunnassa harvemmin. “Eduskunnan vierailijatiedot antavat vaillinaisen mutta kiinnostavan näkökulman lobbaukseen, josta on tällä hetkellä vähän julkista tietoa saatavilla. Eduskunta julkaisee listat valiokunnissa kuulluista henkilöistä, mutta vaikuttamisen painopiste on selvästi muualla”, sanoo Aleksi Knuutila, Open Knowledge Finlandin tutkija. Esimerkiksi vuonna 2014 valiokunnissa kuultiin noin 6 600 asiantuntijaa. Muut vierailut päättäjien luona ovat kuitenkin huomattavasti yleisempiä. Tutkimuksen perusteella kansanedustajien sekä heidän avustajiensa tapaavat vuosittain eduskunnassa noin 14 400 vierailijaa. —

Open Knowledge Finland on rekisteröity voittoa tavoittelematon yhdistys, joka on osa suurempaa kansainvälistä Open Knowledge -verkostoa. Sen tarkoituksena on edistää avointa dataa, tiedon julkisuusperiaatteen toteutumista sekä avointa yhteiskuntaa Suomessa.

Lisätietoja:

Teemu Ropponen, toiminnanjohtaja, Open Knowledge Finland, 040 5255153, teemu.ropponen@okf.fi Joonas Pekkanen, puheenjohtaja, Avoin ministeriö, 050 5846800, joonas.pekkanen@avoinministerio.fi

 

www.lobbauslapinakyvaksi.fi FB: www.facebook.com/LobbausLapinakyvaksi Twitter: @LobbausAloite

The post Kiista eduskunnan vierailijatiedoista kirvoitti Lobbaus läpinäkyväksi -kansalaisaloitteen appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Eduskunnan vierailijatiedot saatavana toimittajille vuoden ajalta

aleksi - October 8, 2017 in avoin eduskunta, eduskunta, Featured, Freedom of Information, Open Democracy, Open Government Data, projects

Open Knowledge Finland ry (OKFI) on koonnut eduskunnasta vierailleista tietokannan, joka kuvaa yli 24 500 tapaamista eduskunnassa, vuoden 2016 toukokuusta vuoden 2017 huhtikuuhun. Tietokanta tarjoaa ensimmäisen kerran laajan aineiston edunvalvonnasta, joka tapahtuu Suomessa ilman läpinäkyvyyttä tai yhteisiä pelisääntöjä. Järjestö tarjoaa tietokannan kokonaisuudessaan toimittajien käyttöön. Eduskunta pitää kirjaa rakennuksessa päättäjien vieraana olleista henkilöistä. Vierailijatiedot kertovat siis muun muassa mitä asiantuntijoita, järjestöjä ja yrityksiä kansanedustajat ovat kuulleet. Eduskunta päätti alkaa tuhota vierailijatietoja siitä huolimatta, että korkein hallinto-oikeus oli todennut ne julkisiksi. Aiheesta syntyi paljon julkista keskustelua syyskuussa.  Tosiasiassa silppurilta säilyi joukko vanhempia tietoja. Kun eduskunta viime huhtikuussa alkoi tuhoamaan tietoja, se tulkitsi lailliseksi velvollisuudekseen säilyttää tiedot edellisen vuoden ajalta. OKFI pyysi eduskunnalta pääsyä vanhempiin vierailijatietoihin, ja työskenteli pitkään muuttaakseen nämä sähköiseen, rakenteiseen muotoon niiden läpikäymisen helpottamiseksi. Tietokanta tarjoaa ensimmäisen kerran laajan aineiston edunvalvonnasta, joka tapahtuu Suomessa pimennossa ja vailla pelisääntöjä. Eduskunnassa läpinäkyvyyttä hoidetaan julkaisemalla listoja valiokunnissa kuulluista henkilöistä, mutta muiden tapaamisten kautta tapahtuva lobbaaminen on ollut hämärän peitossa. Vierailijatiedoista käy ilmi, että lobbaamisen painopiste on kuitenkin muualla kuin valiokunnissa, sillä eturyhmät ja asiantuntijat tapaavat edustajia enemmän valiokuntien ulkopuolella. OKFI tarjoaa keräämänsä tietokannan vierailijoista kokonaisuudessaan toimittajien käyttöön. Tietojen luovuttaminen tätä laajempaan käyttöön ei ole mahdollista, koska tiedot sisältävät yksittäisiä vierailijoita koskevia yksityiskohtia, jotka voivat olla arkaluontoisia. Siksi tiedot jaetaan vain toimijoiden kanssa jotka pystyvät seuraamaan korkean tason tietoturvaa ja tietosuojaa sekä ovat sitoutuneita vastuullisiin toimintatapoihin, eivätkä julkaise yksilöiden yksityisyyssuojaa rikkovia tietoja. Tietojen avulla toimittajat pystyvät kysymään parempia kysymyksiä edunvalvonnasta sekä selvittämään poliittisten päätösten taustaa. Vierailijatietojen kaltainen aineisto ei itsessään riitä edunvalvonnan läpinäkyvyyden varmistamiseksi, mutta OKFI toivoo sen synnyttävän keskustelua läpinäkyvyyden ja avoimempien toimintatapojen tarpeesta. Edunvalvonta kuuluu demokratiaan, mutta ongelmia syntyy silloin kun se ei ole avointa. Ilman läpinäkyvyyttä tapahtuva lobbaaminen voi kannustaa toimintatapoihin, jotka eivät kestäisi päivänvaloa. Lisäksi kansalaisilla on oikeus tietää, millä lailla eturyhmät ovat vaikuttaneet poliitikkoihin – onhan heidän vastuulla myös vaaleissa valita edustajat heidän toimintansa perusteella. OKFI ja Avoin ministeriö valmistelevat kansalaisaloitetta, joka muuttaisi eduskunnan toimintaa avoimemmaksi. Aloite pyrkii luomaan yhteisen järjestelmän, jonka pohjata kansanedustajan ja puolueen henkilökunta voisivat julkaista kalenteristaan tapaamisensa sidosryhmien kanssa. Aloite sekä siihen liittyvä kampanja käynnistetään lähiviikkoina. Aiheesta järjestetään lehdistötilaisuus perjantaina 13.10. kello 9. Toimittajia, jotka haluavat saada pääsyn tietokantaa pyydetään tai ovat muuten kiinnostuneita aiheesta pyydetään paikalle. Ilmoittautuminen 11.10. mennessä osoitteessa http://okf.fi/lehdisto-ilmoittautuminen. Jos et pääse paikalle mutta haluaisit käyttää tietoja työssäsi, ota yhteyttä osoitteeseen teemu.ropponen@okf.fi. Tiedon jakaminen on mahdollista myös vastuullisesti toimivien freelance-toimittajien kanssa. Aika: Perjantai 13.10. klo 9-10

Paikka: Maria 01, Lapinlahdenkatu 16, FI-00180 Helsinki

The post Eduskunnan vierailijatiedot saatavana toimittajille vuoden ajalta appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Kiista eduskunnan vierailijatiedoista – mistä tarkalleen on kyse ja miten eteenpäin?

Open Knowledge Finland - September 22, 2017 in avoin eduskunta, eduskunta, Featured, Freedom of Information, julkisuuslaki, KHO, lobbarirekisteri, lobbaus, lobbausrekisteri, Open Democracy, Open Government Data, open parliament, parliament, tietopyyntö, vaikuttamistyö

  Viime viikolla kiista eduskunnan vierailijatietojen julkisuudesta ja laajemmin keskustelu lobbaamisen ja vaikuttamistyön avoimuudesta nousi vahvasti esiin mediassa sen jälkeen kun Svenska Yle raportoi varsin erikoisista käänteistä pitkässä prosessissa. Huomasimme reilun viikon aikana yli kolmekymmentä artikkelia eri medioissa, minkä lisäksi keskustelu on käynyt erittäin vilkkaana sosiaalisessa mediassa.

Aikajanaa – mitä on oikeastaan tapahtunut

Koko prosessi on kestänyt nyt noin kolme vuotta, ei suinkaan kaksi viikkoa. Karkeasti tietopyynnöt ja kiistat voidaan jakaa esimerkiksi seuraavasti:
  • Alkuperäinen yhtä viikkoa koskeva tietopyyntö ja tietoja koskeva kiista
  • Tietopyynnön tietojen luovutustapaa (sähköisesti vai paikan päällä) koskeva kiista
  • Päiväkohtaisten vierailijatietojen tietopyyntöjä koskeva kiista
  • Päiväkohtaisten vierailijatietojen saatavuutta paikan päällä koskeva kiista
Toki on tärkeää huomata laajempi konteksti, eli Open Knowledge Finland ry:n ja Avoin ministeriö ry:n kannalta tässä on kokonaisuudessa on kyse vaikuttamistyön avoimuudesta – ei vain eduskunnan vierailijalistojen julkisuudesta ja käytöstä vaikkapa toimituksellisiin tarkoituksiin. Alla on avattu hiukan tapauksen historiaa.

2014 – Alkuperäinen tietopyyntö

Avoin ministeriö ry esitti 19.9.2014 eduskunnalle tietopyynnön eduskunnan vierailijatiedoista ajalta 10.–16.2.2014. Taustana ko. tietopyynnölle oli “Järkeä tekijänoikeuslakiin” -kansalaisaloite ja sen käsittely eduskunnassa. Aloitteen käsittelyn yhteydessä keskusteltiin runsaasti lobbaajien vahvasta vaikutusvallasta lainsäädäntöön, esimerkiksi Helsingin Sanomat kirjoitti 7.2.2014 kuinka kansanedustajat kopioivat puheensa lähes sanasta sanaan lobbausjärjestöiltä. Avoin ministeriö ry halusi selvittää, ketkä eduskunnassa kävivät lobbaamassa asian tiimoilta sivistysvaliokunnan kansanedustajia valiokunnan kuulemien virallisten asiantuntijoiden lisäksi. Ylen Linus Lång – edellisestä tietämättä eli sattumalta – pyysi vastaavanlaisia tietoja muutamaa viikkoa myöhemmin (20.10.2014), pidempää ajanjaksoa koskien. 7.11.2014 Turvallisuuspäällikkö Savola tekee päätöksen, ettei mitään tietoja luovuteta. 12.11.2014 Avoin ministeriö valittaa Savolan päätöksestä kansliatoimikunnalle. 19.12.2014 Kansliatoimikunta päätti kumota Savolan päätöksen valituksen johdosta, mutta päätti samalla, ettei tietoja kansanedustajien vieraista kuitenkaan julkaistaisi. Käytännössä tämän jälkeen eduskunta luovutti Avoin ministeriö ry:lle Exceleitä, joista oli poistettu lähes kaikki tiedot.

2015

13.1.2015 Hallintojohtajan muistion perusteella eduskunta vaatii maksua excelin sensuroimisesta. 22.1.2015 Avoin ministeriö valittaa kansliatoimikunnan päätökestä Korkeimpaan hallinto-oikeuteen. 4.3.2015 Eduskunta luovuttaa mustattuja Exceleitä. Käytännössä kaikki tiedot on poistettu. 13.3.2015 Eduskunta lähettää laskun mustattujen Exceleiden toimittamisesta. Avoin ministeriö hakee hallintojohtajalta muutosta 31.3.2015. Hallintojohtaja antaa valituksen johdosta 14.4.2015 uuden päätöksen, jonka mukaan lasku on aiheellinen. Avoin ministeriö valittaa asiasta eteenpäin kansliatoimikunnalle 14.4.2015. Hallintojohtaja päättää 13.5.2015 itse perua oman päätöksensä ennen kansliatoimikunnan käsittelyä ja lasku perutaan. 30.3.2015 KHO välittää eduskunnan 5.3.2015 lausunnon ja antaa Avoimelle ministeriölle mahdollisuuden antaa vastaselitys. 22.4.2015 Avoin ministeriö antaa vastaselityksen KHO:lle ja jäädään odottamaan KHO:n päätöstä.

2016 – Korkeimman hallinto-oikeuden pitkään odotettu päätös

20.12.2016 KHO antoi asiassa päätöksen Dnro 291/1/15. KHO päätti, että kansliatoimikunnan päätös on kumottava ja asia on palautettava kansliatoimikunnalle uudelleen käsiteltäväksi. KHO katsoi, että julkisiksi katsottavat tiedot on annettava tietojen pyytäjälle jollakin julkisuuslaissa tarkoitetulla tavalla.

2017 – KHO:n päätöksestä toimintaan – mutta mutkia matkassa, kuviot muuttuvat

Helmikuu

KHO:n päätöksen perusteella kansliatoimikunta teki 23.2.2017 uuden päätöksen, jolla se kumosi aiemman päätöksensä ja velvoitti eduskunnan kanslian turvallisuusosaston antamaan julkisiksi katsotut tiedot (vierailijalistat) tietopyynnön mukaisesti. (liite 2) Maaliskuu

Eduskunnan turvallisuusjohtaja Jukka Savola (yhteyshenkilö vierailijarekisteriä koskevissa asioissa) ilmoittaa sähköpostitse 3.3.2017  että “rekisterissä olevia tietoja säilytetään enintään 12 kuukauden ajan. Näin ollen totean, että pyytämiänne tietoja ei ole enää saatavissa.”(liite 3). Eduskunta siis tuhosi julkisuuslain mukaisen tietopyynnön kohteena olevia, myöhemmin KHO:n päätöksellä julkiseksi määrättyjä dokumentteja luovuttamatta näitä tietoja alkuperäiselle pyytäjälle (!!!).

Huhtikuu

Eduskunta (kansliatoimikunnan päätöksellä) muutti 24.4.2017 vierailijatietoa koskevan järjestelmän rekisteriselostetta (liitteet 5 ja 6) siten, että tietoja säilytettäisiin vain päivän ajan. Tämä selvisi vasta kesäkuussa 2017. (Vanha rekisteriseloste 14.4.2014; Uudet:  “Kulunvalvontapöytäkirja C-D”, “Kulunvalvontapöytäkirja E”, “Kulunvalvontapöytäkirja F” voimassa 24.4.2017 alkaen)  

Toukokuu

8.5.2017 Avoin ministeriö ry uuden tekee tietopyynnön, koskien vierailijatietoja yhdeltä viikolta 2017, 20.-26.3.2017, vaatien ne sähköisessä muodossa, mustaamattomina, kuten KHO on linjannut. 16.5.2017 Turvallisuusjohtaja Savolan päätöksen mukaisesti tietoja ei voida luovuttaa sähköisesti Avoimelle ministeriölle.

Kesäkuu

1.6.2017 Avoin ministeriö esittää kansliatoimikunnalle oikaisuvaatimuksen koskien Savolan päätöstä olla luovuttamatta tietoja sähköisesti. Saimme vihiä, ettei tietoja enää tallenneta kuten aiemmin, joten teemme varmuuden vuoksi päiväkohtaisen tietopyynnön, kuvitellen, ettei tietoja voida tuhota ennenkuin asiaa koskeva oikeusprosessi on käsitelty. 2.6.2017 lähtien Open Knowledge Finland ry on tehnyt eduskunnalle useita erillisiä yksittäisiä päiviä koskevia vastaavia tietopyyntöjä – ko. päivän aikana, ennakoivasti, jne. Tietopyyntöihin on erikseen kirjattu toteamus näkemyksestämme, että tietopyyntöjä EI tule tuhota ennen kuin mahdollisista kielteisistä päätöksistä on valitettu. Näihin tietopyyntöihin eduskunta on vastannut toteamalla, ettei tietoja ole enää olemassa: “tietoja ei ole mahdollista luovuttaa, koska tiedot on henkilörekisterilain mukaisen rekisteriselosteen mukaisesti hävitetty. Tiedot hävitetään automaattisesti päivittäin”  (liite 4). Pyydämme myös tapaamista, jotta voimme sopia mekanismeista, että saamme tiedon KHO:n linjaamalla tavalla, mutta noudattaen tietoturvaa, yksityisyyttä ja rekisteriselostetta. Tapaamisehdotusta ei kommentoida. 15.6.2017 Kansliatoimikunta hylkää Avoin ministeriö ry:n oikaisuvaatimuksen.

Heinäkuu

Avoin ministeriö ry ja Open Knowledge Finland ry kantelevat eduskunnan oikeusasiamiehelle. Kantelu koskee eduskunnan käytäntöä tuhota asiakirja-aineistoa, joihin kohdistuu vireillä oleva julkisuuslain mukainen tietopyyntö ja tietojen luovutukseen liittyvä mahdollinen oikeuskäsittely. Avoin ministeriö ry valittaa hallinto-oikeudelle johtuen eduskunnan kansliatoimikunnan päätöksestä olla luovuttamatta tietoja sähköisesti vastoin KHO:n linjausta.

Syyskuu

7.-8.9.2017 Open Knowledge Finland jatkaa uusien päiväkohtaisten tietopyyntöjen tekemistä. 11.9.2017 Svenska Yle raportoi asiasta, ja julkinen keskustelu kiihtyy. Viime viikkojen mediaseurantaa löytyy täältä. 12.9.2017 Hallintojohtaja linjaa, että vierailjatietoja saa käydä katsomassa paikan päällä eduskunnassa. Ainakin Open Knowledge Finland ja Helsingin Sanomat käyvät paikan päällä, tietoja ei edelleenkään luovuteta. Eduskunta vetoaa, että KHO:n päätös koskisi vain vanhaa tietoa. Nähdäksemme tämä ei pidä paikkaansa, vaan KHO:n tapaukset ovat luonteeltaan ennakkopäätöksiä. KHO on luonnollisesti pohtinut asiaa myös yksityisyydensuojan ym. kannalta. 14.9.2017 Varapuhemies Mauri Pekkarinen ilmoittaa, että tarve esim. lobbarirekisterille selvitetään. 12.-15.9.2017 Open Knowledge Finland käy päivittäin pyytämässä tietoja, saamatta niitä. Käsityksemme mukaan useat mediat ovat tehneet samoin, onnistumatta. Eduskunta ei kirjaa suullisesti tehtyjä tietopyyntöjä edes pyydettäessä (pidämme tätä erikoisena yksityiskohtana). 11.9.-17.9.2017 Keskustelu vierailijalistoista sekä laajemmin lobbausrekisteristä ja lobbauksen pelisäännöistä kiihtyy, yli 30 artikkelia johtavissa medioissa julkaistaan – ja onpa asia myös pilakuvissa ja Ylen Uutisvuodossa. 🙂 20.9. Sen koommin tietosuojavaltuutettu Reijo Aarnio kuin professori Olli Mäenpää eivät anna tukeaan salailulle. 21.9. Vieraslistojen panttaamisesta on tehty neljä kantelua eduskunnan oikeusasiamiehelle ja oikeuskanslerille.

Miten tästä eteenpäin – kohti visiota avoimesta eduskunnasta

Itse vierailijatietoa koskevan kiistan suhteen odotamme eduskunnan oikeusasiamiehen käsittelyä ja asiasta on myös kanneltu oikeuskanslerille joidenkin tahojen toimesta. Mahdollisesti joudumme valittamaan vielä evätyistä päiväkohtaisista tiedoista uudelleen. Tuhottua tietoa on kuitenkin vaikeaa tai mahdotonta saada palautettua. Tässä on kyseessä on kuitenkin paljon isompi asia kuin vain eduskunnan vierailijalistat. Eduskunnan kansliatoimikunta on luvannut selvittää tarvetta jonkinlaiselle lobbaus- ja/tai lobbarirekisterille. Myös Valtioneuvoston selvitys- ja tutkimustoiminto on vihdoin allokoinut asian tutkimiseen vähän varoja. Mielestämme on tärkeää, että tähän keskusteluun osallistuu monipuolisesti poliittinen johto, virkamiehet ja kansalaisyhteiskunta! Haluamme olla ylpeitä avoimesta eduskunnasta! Ohessa muutamia alustavia ajatuksia miten tästä voitaisiin päästä eteenpäin – tärkeää on kuitenkin pohtia ja valmistella #yhdessä, mukaan poliittinen johto, virkamiehet, kansalaisyhteiskunta ja lobbarit.
  1. Poliittinen tahtotila ja visio. Tällä hetkellä avoimuutta edistetään lähinnä pakon edessä. Samaan aikaan esimerkiksi osa maamme historian räikeimpiä korruptiotapauksia on noussut esiin. Avoin eduskunta ja avoin vaikuttaminen vaatii johtajuutta ja visioita, ei vain selvityksiä.
  2. Lobbausrekisterin käyttöönotto eduskunnassa ja sen laajentaminen seuraavassa vaiheessa muuhun julkishallintoon (ja sen edellyttämän lainsäädännön valmistelu). Eduskunnan ei tarvitse jäädä lainsäädäntöä tässä odottamaan vaan voisi esimerkiksi järjestää kokeilun tästä jo saman tien lainsäädäntöä odotellessa. Näkemyksemme mukaan olennaista on nimenomaan LOBBAUSrekisteri, ei lobbarirekisteri. Lobbarit tiedetään jo. Eduskunnan varapuhemies Pekkarinen on ilmoittanut asian otettavan nopeasti käsittelyyn – luonnollisesti odotamme, että kansalaisyhteiskunta kutsutaan mukaan keskusteluun, vielä sellaisia kutsuja ei ole näkynyt.
  3. Avoin data. Eduskunnan aineiston julkaiseminen verkkosivujen lisäksi koneluettavassa rakenteellisessa muodossa, jotta sitä voidaan helpommin jatkokäsitellä. Lainsäädäntöasiakirja-aineiston lisäksi rakenteelliseen (ja tarkempaan esim. y-tunnukset sisältävään) dataan pitäisi päästä muun muassa sidonnaisuusrekisterin osalta.
  4. Valiokuntien työskentelyä tulisi avata. Yksi helppo, mutta merkittävä askel olisi, että asiantuntijalausunnot tulisivat julki heti, kun ne on saatu. Tämä edistää ajankohtaista julkista keskustelua – nyt asiantuntijoiden lausunnot tulevat julki vasta, kun poliittiset linjaukset ovat niiden pohjalta tehty,olivat asiantuntijalausunnot kuinka kyseenalaistettavissa tahansa.
  5. Sidonnaisuusilmoitusten laajentamista tulisi harkita. Esimerkiksi valtiosihteerit, poliittiset avustajat ja korkeat virkamiehet käyttävät huomattavaa valtaa. Olisi hyvä harkita missä määrin heidän tulisi ilmoittaa omista sidonnaisuuksistaan.
  6. Luodaan pysyvät avoimet prosessit sille, miten eduskunnan työskentelyä jatkuvasti kehitetään avoimempaan, osallistavampaan ja vastuullisempaan suuntaan pitäisi luoda yhteistyössä kansalaisjärjestöjen ja tutkijoiden kanssa.  Avoimuuteen liittyviä prosesseja ja uudistuksia tulisi kirjata esimerkiksi eduskunnan työjärjestykseen, jolloin ne olisivat riittävän velvoittavia.
Jäämme odottamaan mielenkiinnolla miten avoimesti seuraavia askelia otetaan Teemu Ropponen Toiminnanjohtaja Open Knowledge Finland ry Joonas Pekkanen Avoin ministeriö ry Aleksi Knuutila Tutkija Open Knowledge Finland ry

Liitetiedostot (ym. linkkejä täydentäen)

  1. KHO:n päätös 20.12.2016, Dnro 291/1/15
  2. Eduskunnan kansliatoimikunnan päätös 23.2.2017
  3. Jukka Savolan sähköposti 3.3.2017
  4. Jukka Savolan päätös 14.6.2017 koskien päiväkohtaisia tietopyyntöjä
  5. Eduskunnan kulunvalvontatietojen rekisteriseloste 14.4.2014
  6. Eduskunnan kulunvalvontatietojen päivitetyt rekisteriselosteet 24.4.2017 alkaen
    1. Rekisteriseloste “Kulunvalvontapöytäkirja C-D”  (Eduskunnan C- ja D-rakennuksien kulunvalvonta.)
    2. Rekisteriseloste “Kulunvalvontapöytäkirja E”  (Eduskuntatalon (päärakennus) kulunvalvonta (Eduskuntatalon peruskorjauksen aikana väistötilana toimivan S-talon kulunvalvonta).
    3. Rekisteriseloste “Kulunvalvontapöytäkirja F”  (Eduskunnan lisärakennuksen kulunvalvonta)
The post Kiista eduskunnan vierailijatiedoista – mistä tarkalleen on kyse ja miten eteenpäin? appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Using the Global Open Data Index to strengthen open data policies: Best practices from Mexico

Oscar Montiel - August 16, 2017 in Global Open Data Index, Open Data Index, Open Government Data, Open Knowledge

This is a blog post coauthored with Enrique Zapata, of the Mexican National Digital Strategy. As part of the last Global Open Data Index (GODI), Open Knowledge International (OKI) decided to have a dialogue phase, where we invited individuals, CSOs, and national governments to exchange different points of view, knowledge about the data and understand data publication in a more useful way. In this process, we had a number of valuable exchanges that we tried to capture in our report about the state of open government data in 2017, as well as the records in the forum. Additionally, we decided to highlight the dialogue process between the government and civil society in Mexico and their results towards improving data publication in the executive authority, as well as funding to expand this work to other authorities and improve the GODI process. Here is what we learned from the Mexican dialogue:

The submission process

During this stage, GODI tries to directly evaluate how easy it is to find and their data quality in general. To achieve this, civil society and government actors discussed how to best submit and agreed to submit together, based on the actual data availability.   Besides creating an open space to discuss open data in Mexico and agreeing on a joint submission process, this exercise showed some room for improvement in the characteristics that GODI measured in 2016:
  • Open licenses: In Mexico and many other countries, the licenses are linked to datasets through open data platforms. This showed some discrepancies with the sources referenced by the reviewers since the data could be found in different sites where the license application was not clear.
  • Data findability: Most of the requested datasets assess in GODI are the responsibility of the federal government and are available in datos.gob.mx. Nevertheless, the titles to identify the datasets are based on technical regulation needs, which makes it difficult for data users to easily reach the data.
  • Differences of government levels and authorities: GODI assesses national governments but some of these datasets – such as land rights or national laws – are in the hands of other authorities or local governments. This meant that some datasets can’t be published by the federal government since it’s not in their jurisdiction and they can’t make publication of these data mandatory.
 

Open dialogue and the review process

  During the review stage, taking the feedback into account, the Open Data Office of the National Digital Strategy worked on some of them. They summoned a new session with civil society, including representatives from the Open Data Charter and OKI in order to:
  • Agree on the state of the data in Mexico according to GODI characteristics;
  • Show the updates and publication of data requested by GODI;
  • Discuss paths to publish data that is not responsibility of the federal government;
  • Converse about how they could continue to strengthen the Mexican Open Data Policy.
  The results   As a result of this dialogue, we agreed six actions that could be implemented internationally beyond just the Mexican context both by governments with centralised open data repositories and those which don’t centralise their data, as well as a way to improve the GODI methodology:  
  1. Open dialogue during the GODI process: Mexico was the first country to develop a structured dialogue to agree with open data experts from civil society about submissions to GODI. The Mexican government will seek to replicate this process in future evaluations and include new groups to promote open data use in the country. OKI will take this experience into account to improve the GODI processes in the future.
  2. Open licenses by default: The Mexican government is reviewing and modifying their regulations to implement the terms of Libre Uso MX for every website, platform and online tool of the national government. This is an example of good practice which OKI have highlighted in our ongoing Open Licensing research.
  3. “GODI” data group in CKAN: Most data repositories allow users to create thematic groups. In the case of GODI, the Mexican government created the “Global Open Data Index” group in datos.gob.mx. This will allow users to access these datasets based on their specific needs.
  4. Create a link between government built visualization tools and datos.gob.mx: The visualisations and reference tools tend to be the first point of contact for citizens. For this reason, the Mexican government will have new regulations in their upcoming Open Data Policy so that any new development includes visible links to the open data they use.
  5. Multiple access points for data: In August 2018, the Mexican government will launch a new section on datos.gob.mx to provide non-technical users easy access to valuable data. These data called “‘Infraestructura de Datos Abiertos MX’ will be divided into five easy-to-explore and understand categories.
  6. Common language for data sets: Government naming conventions aren’t the easiest to understand and can make it difficult to access data. The Mexican government has agreed to change the names to use more colloquial language can help on data findability and promote their use. In case this is not possible with some datasets, the government will go for an option similar to the one established in point 5.
We hope these changes will be useful for data users as well as other governments who are looking to improve their publication policies. Got any other ideas? Share them with us on Twitter by messaging @OKFN or send us an email to index@okfn.org  

Avoin data osana datataloutta – sumeaa möhnää vai kirkasta lähdevettä?

Open Knowledge Finland - August 15, 2017 in avoin data, avoin talousdata, datatalous, Featured, godi, liiketoiminta, mydata, Open Government Data, ostolaskut, talous

HS pääkirjoitus 7.8.2017 tarttui tärkeään aiheeseen, datan ja tiedon avoimuuteen – johon myös lukijat vastasivat [1, 2]. Timo Paukku puolestaan toi kolumnissaan (HS 10.8.2017) esiin Viron toiminnan digitalisaation mallimaana, toistaen usein kuullun vertauksen datasta uutena öljynä. Data on keskeisen liiketoiminnan resurssi ja moottori niin kutsutulle datataloudelle, johon Suomikin enenevässä määrin pyrkii. Avoimessa yhteiskunnassa datan pitäisi kuitenkin muistuttaa enemmän vettä kuin öljyä: kaikkien saatavilla olevaa perushyödykettä, joka kastelee ja virkistää laajasti eri aloilla julkisella, yksityisellä ja kolmannella sektorilla – kansalaisia unohtamatta.

Odotukset avoimen datan liiketoimintaa kohtaan ovat olleet epärealistiset – merkittävät taloudelliset vaikutukset tulossa

Suurimmat avoimeen dataan liittyvät odotukset liittyvät sen liiketoimintaa piristävään vaikutukseen. EU:ssa arvioidaan luotavan 100 000 työpaikkaa avoimen datan ympärille vuoteen 2020 mennessä.  Avoimen datan potentiaaliseksi suoraksi hyödyksi on arvioitu 40 miljardia ja välillisiksi 100 miljardia euroa vuosittain pelkästään EU-alueella. Esim. Berends et al. listaavat joitain avoimen datan vaikutuksia. Lähde: https://www.europeandataportal.eu/sites/default/files/re-using_open _data.pdf Odotukset uutta liiketoimintaa kohtaan ovat niin suuret, että ne ovat väistämättä epärealistiset. Avoimen datan merkitys liiketoiminnalle sekä laajemmin taloudelle on merkittävä, mutta ei irrallisena saarekkeena, vaan osana laajempaa kehitystä, johon kuuluvat avoimen datan lisäksi myös ilmiöt ja teknologiat kuten My Data (ihmisten itseään koskeva ns. omadata), massadata, data-analytiikka ja tekoäly. Saadaksemme hyötyä irti avoimesta datasta, on meidän perinteisen innovaatiotoiminnan lisäksi panostettava avoimen datan löydettävyyteen ja laatuun sekä datatalouden osaamiseen kaikilla koulutustasoilla. On kuiteknin syytä muistaa, että suuri osa avoimen datan vaikuttavuudesta tulee muualta kuin suoraan liiketoiminnasta. Jos ajatellaan vaikkapa leikkausjonojen pituutta, hoitoonpääsytilastoja, velkaantumista, valtion hankintoja tai avoimia lobbaustietoja, on helppo kuvitella miten hyödyllistä olisi saada dataa ja analysoida sitä eri näkökulmista. Suomessa julkisen datan avaamista ja hyödyntämistä edistetään laajasti, hyvässä yhteistyössä julkishallinnon, yritysten ja järjestöjen kesken. Open Knowledge Finland ry ja kansainvälinen Open Knowledge -järjestöverkosto edistävät tiedon avaamista Suomessa ja ympäri maailmaa. Laajat julkiset hankkeet, kuten kuuden suurimman kaupungin 6Aika-hanke, edistävät avoimeen dataan perustuvan uuden liiketoiminnan syntymistä kuudessa suurimmassa kaupungissamme – www.databusiness.fi -sivustolta löytyy toista sataa avointa dataa hyödyntävää palvelukuvausta! Pääkaupunkiseudun kaupunkien erinomaiseen Helsinki Region Infoshare -palveluun, josta löytyy satoja tietoaineistoja, käydään puolestaan jatkuvasti tutustumassa ympäri maailmaa. Elinkeinoelämän tutkimuslaitos Etla ja Open Knowledge Finland selvittivät yhdessä avoimen datan vaikuttavuutta liiketoiminnassa. Selvityksen perusteella avointa dataa innovaatiotoiminnassaan hyödyntävät yritykset tuovat markkinoille uusia tavara- ja palveluinnovaatioita suhteellisesti useammin kuin muut yritykset. Dataa uusien innovaatioiden kehittämisessä käyttäneiden ICT-yritysten liikevaihto kasvoi vuosina 2012–14 keskimäärin yli 17 prosenttia muita enemmän. Erityisesti liikennetietojen hyödyntäminen kiihdytti liikevaihdon kasvua. (Tämän tutkimukset sisällöistä tulossa oman kirjoitus myöhemmin.)

Talousdataa on avattu ja avataan lisää lähiaikoina

Pääkirjoituksessa ettei dataa, jonka avulla voisi seurata esimerkiksi valtion ja kuntien viranomaisten rahankäyttöä, ole ollut saatavilla. Kirjoittaja on kyllä osin oikeassa siinä mielessä, että kansainvälisissä vertailuissa nimenomaan taloustietojen avoimuuden osalta Suomen sijoittuu surkeasti, mutta juuri nyt on hyvä mahdollisuus kohentaa tilannetta. Toisaalta, kaupunkien ostodataa on avattu useissa suomalaisissa kaupungeissa. Esimerkiksi Helsinki on avannut yksityiskohtaisen ostodatansa jo vuosia sitten (vrt. esim.  HS 28.11.2014) ja kaupunginjohtaja on arvioinut pelkästään datan avaamisen tuovan 1-2% säästöt vuosittain. Valmisteilla oleva ns. Hansel-laki avaisi koko julkishallinnon hankinnat ja ostot. Tämän seurauksena Suomi täyttäisi kansainvälisiä sitoumuksiaan, saisi verovarat tehokkaammin käyttöön, kilpailu julkisista hankinnoista olisi reilumpaa ja julkinen rahankäyttö olisi ylipäätään avoimempaa. Lähde: https://twitter.com/avoindatafi/status/879965329954398208 Pääkirjoituksessa mainittiin myös, että “toistaiseksi avattu data on verotietoja lukuunottamatta harmitonta”. Avoimuus arveluttaa monia. On selvää, että avattu data ei saa loukata esimerkiksi henkilön yksityisyyttä. Sen sijaan huoli avoimuuden ja toiminnan läpinäkyvyyden mukana mahdollisesti tulevasta kritiikistä ei ole kestävä peruste tiedon panttaamiselle. Avoimen datan avulla voidaan tunnistaa hallinnon tai yritysten tehottomuutta tai epäselvyyksiä, auttaa kansalaisia ymmärtämään talouden tai ympäristön tilaa paremmin tai kehittämään palveluita, jotka esimerkiksi helpottavat metsän hoitoa tai myyntiä. Julkisten tietovarantojemme monipuolinen ja älykäs hyödyntäminen on yhteiskuntamme etu ja kilpailuvaltti. Juuri siksi meidän on edelleen pistettävä painetta päättäjiä ja datanomistajia kohtaan. Tahdomme enemmän! The post Avoin data osana datataloutta – sumeaa möhnää vai kirkasta lähdevettä? appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.