You are browsing the archive for Open Source.

Frictionless Data Case Study: OpenML

Joaquin Vanschoren - December 6, 2017 in case study, Data Package, Frictionless Data, Open Source

The Frictionless Data project is about making it effortless to transport high quality data among different tools and platforms for further analysis. We are doing this by developing a set of software, specifications, and best practices for publishing data. The heart of Frictionless Data is the Data Package specification, a containerization format for any kind of data based on existing practices for publishing open-source software. The Frictionless Data  case study series highlights projects and organisations who are working with Frictionless Data specifications and software in interesting and innovative ways. OpenML is one such organization. This case study has been made possible by OpenML’s Heidi Seibold and Joaquin Vanschoren, the authors of this blog.   OpenML is an online platform and service for machine learning, whose goal is to make machine learning and data analysis simple, accessible, collaborative and open with an optimal division of labour between computers and humans. People can upload and share data sets and questions (prediction tasks) on OpenML that they then collaboratively solve using machine learning algorithms. We first heard about the Frictionless Data project through School of Data. One of the OpenML core members is also involved in School of Data and used Frictionless Data’s data packages in one of the open data workshops from School of Data Switzerland. We offer open source tools to download data into your favourite machine learning environments and work with it. You can then upload your results back onto the platform so that others can learn from you. If you have data, you can use OpenML to get insights on what machine learning method works well to answer your question. Machine Learners can use OpenML to find interesting data sets and questions that are relevant for others and also for machine learning research (e.g. learning how algorithms behave on different types of data sets).

Image of data set list on OpenML

OpenML currently works with tabular data in Attribute Relation File Format (ARFF) accompanied by metadata in an xml or json file. It is actually very similar to Frictionless Data’s tabular data package specification, but with ARFF instead of csv. 

Image of a data set overview on openML

In the coming months, we are looking to adopt Frictionless Data specifications to improve user friendliness on OpenML. We hope to make it possible for users to upload and connect datasets in data packages format. This will be a great shift because it would enable people to easily build and share machine learning models trained on any dataset in the frictionless data ecosystem. We firmly believe that if data packages become the go-to specification for sharing data in scientific communities, accessibility to data that’s currently ‘hidden’ in data platforms and university libraries will improve vastly, and are keen to adopt and use the specification on OpenML in the coming months. Interested in contributing to OpenML’s quest to adopt the data package specification as an import and export option for data on the OpenML platform? Start here.

Visual gateways into science: Why it’s time to change the way we discover research

Peter Kraker - November 14, 2017 in open knowledge maps, Open Science, Open Source, tools

Have you ever noticed that it is really hard to get an overview of a research field that you know nothing about? Let’s assume for a minute that a family member or a loved one of yours has fallen ill and unfortunately, the standard treatment isn’t working. Like many other people, you now want to get into the research on the illness to better understand what’s going on. You proceed to type the name of the disease into PubMed or Google Scholar – and you are confronted with thousands of results, more than you could ever read. It’s hard to determine where to start, because you don’t understand the terminology in the field, you don’t know what the main areas are, and it’s hard to identify important papers, journals, and authors just by looking at the results list. With time and patience you could probably get there. However, this is time that you do not have, because decisions need to be made. Decisions that may have grave implications for the patient. If you have ever had a similar experience, you are not alone. We are all swamped with the literature, and even experts struggle with this problem. In the Zika epidemic in 2015 for example, many people scrambled to get an overview of what was until then an obscure research topic. This included researchers, but also practitioners and public health officials. And it’s not just medicine; almost all areas of research have become so specialized that they’re almost impenetrable from the outside. But the thing is, there are many people on the outside that could benefit from scientific knowledge. Think about journalists, fact checkers, policy makers or students. They all have the same problem – they don’t have a way in. Reuse of scientific knowledge within academia is already limited, but when we’re looking at transfer to practice, the gap is even wider. Even in application-oriented disciplines, only a small percentage of research findings ever influence practice – and even if they do so, often with a considerable delay. At Open Knowledge Maps, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the visibility of scientific knowledge for science and society, it is our mission to change that. We want to provide visual gateways into research – because we think that it is important that we do not only provide access to research findings, but also to enable discoverability of scientific knowledge. At the moment, there is a missing link between accessibility and discoverability – and we want to provide that link. Imagine a world, where you can get an overview of any research field at a glance, meaning you can easily determine the main areas and relevant concepts in the field. In addition, you can instantly identify a set of papers that are relevant for your information need. We call such overviews knowledge maps. You can find an example for the field of heart diseases below. The bubbles represent the main areas and relevant papers are already attached to each of the areas. Now imagine that each of these maps is adapted to the needs of different types of users, researchers, students, journalists or patients. And not only that: they are all structured and connected and they contain annotated pathways through the literature as to what to read first, and how to proceed afterwards. This is the vision that we’ve have been working on for the past 1.5 years as a growing community of designers, developers, communicators, advisors, partners, and users. On our website, we are offering an openly accessible service, which allows you to create a knowledge map for any discipline. Users can choose between two databases: Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE) with more than 110 million scientific documents from all disciplines, and PubMed, the large biomedical database with 26 million references. We use the 100 most relevant results for a search term as reported by the respective database as a starting point for our knowledge maps. We use text similarity to create the knowledge maps. The algorithm groups those papers together that have many words in common. See below for an example map of digital education. We have received a lot of positive feedback on this service from the community. We are honored and humbled by hundreds of enthusiastic posts in blogs, and on Facebook and Twitter. The service has also been featured on the front pages of reddit and HackerNews, and recently, we won the Open Minds Award, the Austrian Open Source Award. Since the first launch of the service in May 2016, we have had more than 200,000 visits on Open Knowledge Maps. Currently, more than 20,000 users leverage Open Knowledge Maps for their research, work, and studies per month. The “Open” in Open Knowledge Maps does not only stand for open access articles – we want to go the whole way of open science and create a public good. This means that all of our software is developed open source. You can also find our development roadmap on Github and leave comments by opening an issue. The knowledge maps themselves are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license and can be freely shared and modified. We will also openly share the underlying data, for example as Linked Open Data. This way, we want to contribute to the open science ecosystem that our partners, including Open Knowledge Austria, rOpenSci, ContentMine, the Internet Archive Labs and Wikimedia are creating. Open Knowledge International has played a crucial role in incubating the idea of an open discovery platform, by way of a Panton Fellowship where the first prototype of the search service was created. Since then, the Open Knowledge Network has enthusiastically supported the project, in particular the Austrian chapter as well as Open Knowledge International, Open Knowledge Germany and other regional organisations. Members of the international Open Knowledge community have become indispensable for Open Knowledge Maps, be it as team members, advisors or active supporters. A big shout-out and thank you to you! As a next step, we want to work on structuring and connecting these maps – and we want to turn discovery into a collaborative process. Because someone has already gone that way before and they have all the overview and the insights. We want to enable people to communicate this knowledge so that we can start laying pathways through science for each other. We have created a short video to illustrate this idea:

Visual gateways into science: Why it’s time to change the way we discover research

Peter Kraker - November 14, 2017 in open knowledge maps, Open Science, Open Source, tools

Have you ever noticed that it is really hard to get an overview of a research field that you know nothing about? Let’s assume for a minute that a family member or a loved one of yours has fallen ill and unfortunately, the standard treatment isn’t working. Like many other people, you now want to get into the research on the illness to better understand what’s going on. You proceed to type the name of the disease into PubMed or Google Scholar – and you are confronted with thousands of results, more than you could ever read. It’s hard to determine where to start, because you don’t understand the terminology in the field, you don’t know what the main areas are, and it’s hard to identify important papers, journals, and authors just by looking at the results list. With time and patience you could probably get there. However, this is time that you do not have, because decisions need to be made. Decisions that may have grave implications for the patient. If you have ever had a similar experience, you are not alone. We are all swamped with the literature, and even experts struggle with this problem. In the Zika epidemic in 2015 for example, many people scrambled to get an overview of what was until then an obscure research topic. This included researchers, but also practitioners and public health officials. And it’s not just medicine; almost all areas of research have become so specialized that they’re almost impenetrable from the outside. But the thing is, there are many people on the outside that could benefit from scientific knowledge. Think about journalists, fact checkers, policy makers or students. They all have the same problem – they don’t have a way in. Reuse of scientific knowledge within academia is already limited, but when we’re looking at transfer to practice, the gap is even wider. Even in application-oriented disciplines, only a small percentage of research findings ever influence practice – and even if they do so, often with a considerable delay. At Open Knowledge Maps, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the visibility of scientific knowledge for science and society, it is our mission to change that. We want to provide visual gateways into research – because we think that it is important that we do not only provide access to research findings, but also to enable discoverability of scientific knowledge. At the moment, there is a missing link between accessibility and discoverability – and we want to provide that link. Imagine a world, where you can get an overview of any research field at a glance, meaning you can easily determine the main areas and relevant concepts in the field. In addition, you can instantly identify a set of papers that are relevant for your information need. We call such overviews knowledge maps. You can find an example for the field of heart diseases below. The bubbles represent the main areas and relevant papers are already attached to each of the areas. Now imagine that each of these maps is adapted to the needs of different types of users, researchers, students, journalists or patients. And not only that: they are all structured and connected and they contain annotated pathways through the literature as to what to read first, and how to proceed afterwards. This is the vision that we’ve have been working on for the past 1.5 years as a growing community of designers, developers, communicators, advisors, partners, and users. On our website, we are offering an openly accessible service, which allows you to create a knowledge map for any discipline. Users can choose between two databases: Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE) with more than 110 million scientific documents from all disciplines, and PubMed, the large biomedical database with 26 million references. We use the 100 most relevant results for a search term as reported by the respective database as a starting point for our knowledge maps. We use text similarity to create the knowledge maps. The algorithm groups those papers together that have many words in common. See below for an example map of digital education. We have received a lot of positive feedback on this service from the community. We are honored and humbled by hundreds of enthusiastic posts in blogs, and on Facebook and Twitter. The service has also been featured on the front pages of reddit and HackerNews, and recently, we won the Open Minds Award, the Austrian Open Source Award. Since the first launch of the service in May 2016, we have had more than 200,000 visits on Open Knowledge Maps. Currently, more than 20,000 users leverage Open Knowledge Maps for their research, work, and studies per month. The “Open” in Open Knowledge Maps does not only stand for open access articles – we want to go the whole way of open science and create a public good. This means that all of our software is developed open source. You can also find our development roadmap on Github and leave comments by opening an issue. The knowledge maps themselves are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license and can be freely shared and modified. We will also openly share the underlying data, for example as Linked Open Data. This way, we want to contribute to the open science ecosystem that our partners, including Open Knowledge Austria, rOpenSci, ContentMine, the Internet Archive Labs and Wikimedia are creating. Open Knowledge International has played a crucial role in incubating the idea of an open discovery platform, by way of a Panton Fellowship where the first prototype of the search service was created. Since then, the Open Knowledge Network has enthusiastically supported the project, in particular the Austrian chapter as well as Open Knowledge International, Open Knowledge Germany and other regional organisations. Members of the international Open Knowledge community have become indispensable for Open Knowledge Maps, be it as team members, advisors or active supporters. A big shout-out and thank you to you! As a next step, we want to work on structuring and connecting these maps – and we want to turn discovery into a collaborative process. Because someone has already gone that way before and they have all the overview and the insights. We want to enable people to communicate this knowledge so that we can start laying pathways through science for each other. We have created a short video to illustrate this idea:

Introducing W4P, a crowdsourcing for open, social and local projects.

pjpauwels - June 24, 2016 in crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, Featured, General, Open Innovation, Open Source

After 10 months of figuring what we need to build, building it and then testing it in real life situation we can now say: W4P is alive! Or at least in a solid bèta. You can find our presentation in English here: Interested in hearing this talk again and do you have a location and or crowd? Or are you ready to start up a W4P crowdsourcing platform? Contact us!

Introducing W4P, a crowdsourcing for open, social and local projects.

pjpauwels - June 24, 2016 in crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, Featured, General, Open Innovation, Open Source

After 10 months of figuring what we need to build, building it and then testing it in real life situation we can now say: W4P is alive! Or at least in a solid bèta. You can find our presentation in English here:
Interested in hearing this talk again and do you have a location and or crowd? Or are you ready to start up a W4P crowdsourcing platform?
Contact us!

オープンガバメント、オープンデータ、そしてオープンソースについての短編フィルム 「オープン」

Shu Higashi (東 修作) - December 1, 2015 in blog, Featured, Open Data, Open Government Data, Open Source, open-government, Special, オープンガバメント, オープンソース, オープンデータ, 市民参画

この記事は、オープンデータをテーマにした、「オープンデータ Advent Calendar 2015」企画の2日目の原稿です。他の記事は一覧から見れるようになっており、日ごとに記事が増えていく予定です。ぜひ、ご覧ください。
——————————————————–
(訳注:この記事は Open Knowledge ブログ記事の日本語訳です) これは「オープン」の作家兼ディレクターであるリチャード・ピエトロによるゲスト投稿です。 これを読んでいるあなたはたぶん、オープンガバメント、オープンデータ、そしてオープンソースといった用語に精通していることでしょう。そしてこういった運動を通じて、いかに市民参画が根本から変わりつつあるかということをおそらく理解しているでしょう。 しかし次のような課題があります:どうやったら他のみんなにリーチできるのでしょうか?このような用語を聞いたことがなく、市民参画にあまり興味を持っていない人たちに。 私は次のように考えています:市民参画はブランドとしてはあまり良いものではありません。より多くの人々の耳目を集めるためには、そのブランドをより良いものに変える必要があります。 市民参画を考える際にたいていの人は、おそらくどこかで怒鳴り合っているコミュニティの人々を想像しています。もしくは、地方自治体の開発計画懇談会での居眠り大会といったものを思い描くでしょう。日々の暮らしの中に、全く違うことを埋め込む時間のある人はいるのでしょうか?たいていの人は、自分の空き時間を息苦しいミーティングで座っていることよりも何かしら情熱を持てることへの投資に使いたいだろうと私は思います!(息苦しいミーティングがあなたの情熱ならそれもクールだね!) 市民参画は無味乾燥で退屈だとか、あるいは情報通で意識の高い政策大好き人間のことだと思われています。これらの2つのシナリオの間で、自分の声は決して届かないと感じます。なぜそんなことに関わる必要があるのでしょう?市民参画はうまくPRできていません。たいていの人にとって楽しいものとは思われていません。加えて、特にそれが権利、義務、特権、あるいは処罰(裁判官はコミュニティサービスを処罰として提供します)として話される時には、エリート臭も漂います。 そこで、私は違う視点を取り入れました:アートとしての市民参画。これは、アートが単に美術としてだけとらえてはならないということを提案するセス・ゴダンの本「かなめ」を通じて動機づけられました。むしろ、彼はアートが情熱の産物であると主張しています;アートとは何かを創り出すことで、それが市民参画の全てです – 情熱から来る何かをあなたのコミュニティで創り出すのです。 私は「オープン」がオープンガバメント、オープンデータそしてオープンソースを新しい人々にシンプルに紹介することを願っています。なぜなら新しい方法で行われているからです。私の意図は、それを楽しむことで市民参画というブランドを変えはじめることなのです。 例えば、私は自分をオープンガバメント大好き少年と呼んでいます。そのため「オープン」ではできるだけ多くのポップ・カルチャーや「大好き少年タイプ」の引用を割り込ませて使っています。実際のところ、私はこの短編フィルムをマトリックスの「パロディ作品」と呼んでいます。私達がしたことはモーフィアスがネオに「現実の世界」と「マトリックス」の違いを説明している場面を撮り、それを「オープンな世界」対「クローズドな世界」に改変したものです。私達はオフィス・スペース、ザ・シンプソンズ、モンティ・パイソン、そしてスタートレックへのあいさつも含めました。 ボーナスとして、私はこれらのおなじみのテーマと引用が「初心者」にとってオープンガバメント、オープンデータ、そしてオープンソースをより理解しやすくすることを望んでいます。 そういう訳で、これ以上Apu無しで(ザ・シンプソンズのファンなら分かるでしょう)オープンガバメント、オープンデータ、そしてオープンソースに関する世界初の短編フィルム「オープン」をお贈りします。 「オープン」を視聴 THE TEAM BEHIND OPEN Writer and Director: Richard Pietro
Screenplay: Richard Pietro & Rick Weiss
Executive Producers: Keith Loo and Bruce Chau
Cinematographers: Gord Poon & Mike Donis
Technical Lead: Brian Wong
Composer and Sound Engineer: GARU
Actors: Mish Tam & Julian Friday 原文(2015/9/29 Open Knowledge Foundation Blog 記事より):
Original post Open: A Short Film about Open Government, Open Data and Open Source / Richard Pietro, licensed under CC BY 4.0.

링크드 데이터 구축을 위한 오픈 소스 모음 공개

Jangwon Gim - October 5, 2015 in github, OKF, Open Source, 소식

Open Knowledge Korea (OK-Korea) 에서는 Linked Open Data (beta) 프로젝트를 공개 한 이후, 지속적으로 해커톤 및 오픈 데이터 활동을 하고 있습니다. 최근, 국내에서는 정부 3.0이라는 새로운 정부운영 패러다임에 맞춰 공공정보의 개방 및 공유가 활발하게 진행되고 있으며,
데이터를 보다 효율적으로 공개하고 활용하기 위한 노력들이 계속되고 있습니다. 이에 Open Knowledge Korea 에서는 여러 도메인에서 활용되고 있는 데이터를 보다 손 쉽게 공유하고 연결하기 위한 방법의 하나로,
링크드 데이터 구축을 위한 오픈 소스들공개합니다. 이번에 공개되는 오픈 소스들을 통해 여러분들도 가지고 계신 데이터를 이용하여 링크드 데이터를 직접 구축할 수 있습니다.
또한, 링크드 데이터 구축의 편의성을 위해 ‘사용 가이드’ 및 ‘시스템 개요도’ 등을 함께 공개합니다.
  • 참고 사이트 : 공공 데이터와 링크드 데이터의 만남 첫 번째 사례
그리하여, 향후에는 여러분들의 다양한 데이터들이 모여 ‘Open Knowledge’ 생태계를 만들 수 있을 것이라고 생각합니다. 이번에 공개되는 오픈 소스들은, Linked Open Data (beta) 허브 중에서 Connected Data Hub를 만들기 위해 사용된 오픈 소스들이며, 누구나 함께 참여하실 수 있도록 깃허브(Github)를 통해서 공개합니다. 깃허브 주소는 추후 업데이트 예정입니다. 궁금하신 것이 있으면 댓글 또는 페이스북 그룹에 남겨주세요. ^^ 감사합니다.

Open: A Short Film about Open Government, Open Data and Open Source

Guest - September 29, 2015 in Featured, Open Data, Open Government Data, Open Knowledge, Open Source, open-government

This is a guest post from Richard Pietro the writer and director of Open. If you’re reading this, you’re likely familiar with the terms Open Government, Open Data, and Open Source. You probably understand how civic engagement is being radically transformed through these movements. Therein lays the challenge: How can we reach everyone else? The ones who haven’t heard these terms and have little interest in civic engagement. Here’s what I think: Civic engagement is a bad brand. If we’re to capture the attention of more people, we need to change its brand for the better. When most people think of civic engagement, they probably imagine people in a community meeting somewhere yelling at each other. Or, maybe they picture a snooze-fest municipal planning and development consultation. Who has time to fit that in with everything else going on in their lives? I think most people would prefer to invest their spare time on something they’re passionate about; not sitting in a stuffy meeting! (If stuffy meetings ARE your passion, that’s cool too!) Civic engagement is seen as dry and boring, or meant solely for the hyper-informed, hyper-engaged, policy-wonk. Between these two scenarios, you feel your voice will never be heard – so why bother? Civic engagement has bad PR. It isn’t viewed as fun for most people. Plus, I think there’s also an air of elitism, especially when it’s spoken as a right, duty, privilege, or punishment (judges issue community service as a punishment). That’s why I’ve adopted a different perspective: Civic Engagement as Art. This was motivated via Seth Godin’s book “Linchpin” where he suggests that art shouldn’t only be thought of as fine art. Rather, he argues that art is a product of passion; art is creating something, and that’s what civic engagement is all about – creating something in your community that comes from passion. I’m hoping that Open will introduce Open Government, Open Data, and Open Source to new people in simply because it is being done in a new way. My intention is to begin changing the civic engagement brand by having fun with it. For example, I call myself an Open Government Fanboy, so Open uses as many pop-culture and “fanboy-type” references as we could squeeze in. As a matter of fact, I call the film a “spoofy adaptation” of The Matrix. What we did was take the scene where Morpheus is explaining to Neo the difference between the “Real World” and the “Matrix” and adapts it to the “Open World” versus the “Closed World.” We also included nods to Office Space, The Simpsons, Monty Python, and Star Trek. As a bonus, I’m hoping that these familiar themes and references will make it easier for “newbies” to understand Open Government, Open Data, and Open Source space. So, without further Apu (Simpsons fans will get it), I give you Open – The World’s first short film on Open Government, Open Data, and Open Source. Watch Open THE TEAM BEHIND OPEN Writer and Director: Richard Pietro
Screenplay: Richard Pietro & Rick Weiss
Executive Producers: Keith Loo and Bruce Chau
Cinematographers: Gord Poon & Mike Donis
Technical Lead: Brian Wong
Composer and Sound Engineer: GARU
Actors: Mish Tam & Julian Friday

Mindtrek Openmind kokoaa avoimuustoimijat Tampereelle syyskuussa

raimom - August 20, 2015 in Apps4Finland, avoin data, avoin lähdekoodi, avoin sisältö, coss, Data, event, Events, Featured, Mindtrek Openmind, Open Content, Open Data, Open Finland Challenge, Open Source, Tampere

Mindtrek Openmind 2015 open data open content open source Tampere

Mindtrek Openmind 2015 -konferenssin teemoina ovat avoin lähdekoodi, avoin data ja avoimet sisällöt.

Mindtrek Openmind 2015 järjestetään ensimmäistä kertaa avoimuuden teemalla ja tuottajana toimii Suomen avoimien tietojärjestelmien keskus – COSS ry. Open Knowledge Finland on mukana järjestäjäkumppanina. OKFFI osallistui järjestelyihin tarjoamalla kokemuksiaan konferenssin ohjelman joukkoistamiseksi. Ohjelmasta löytyy sisältöä niin businessväelle kuin kehittäjillekin. Tavoitteena on törmäyttää kävijöitä yli toimialarajojen ja näin saada aikaan uusia innovaatioita, liiketoimintamahdollisuuksia ja yhteistyökuvioita. OKFFI:n toiminnanjohtaja Teemu Ropposen vetämässä workshopissa Open Finland Challengen partnerit kertovat kilpailuun avaamista dataseteistään ja niiden mahdollisuuksista. OFC:stä kiinnostuneet voivat osallistua oman ideansa kanssa, jota sparraillaan yhdessä hyvän kilpailutyön jättämiseksi. “OKFFI:n ja COSS:in yhteistyö on alkanut jo itse asiassa ennen OKFFI:n syntymää, kun Openmind-konferenssi järjestettiin Open Knowledge Festivalin yhteydessä syksyllä 2012. Tämän jälkeen olemme yhteistuumin promonneet avointa dataa muun muassa Roadshow’lla ja Open Data Tampereen kuvioissa” Teemu toteaa. Mielenkiintoisten puhujien lisäksi Mindtrek Openmindissa pääsee osallistumaan itse tekemiseen. Academics on Wheels -kiertueella kohtaavat akateemikot ja yritysmaailman edustajat. Demola esittelee korkeakouluopiskelijoiden parhaita yritysprojekteja. Verkostoitumismahdollisuudet jatkuvat myös iltaisin, jolloin on luvassa iltajuhla sekä Tampereen kaupungin järjestämä vastaanotto. Suomen suurimmat kaupungit ovat 6aika-ohjelman ja avoin kaupunki -osion myötä mukana vahvalla panostuksella. Katso alta “6ajan” avoimen datan kärkihankkeen Matti Saastamoisen haastattelu. Nähtäväksi jää, tuleeko konferenssissa uusia datan avauksia julki? Keynote-puhujia konferenssiin saapuu puolestaan Ranskasta, Vatikaanista ja Tanskasta. Konferenssissa nähdään esimerkiksi maailman ensimmäinen avoimen lähdekoodin 3D-tulostettu humanoidirobotti. Vatikaanista saapuu puolestaan Vatikaanin kirjaston tietohallintojohtaja kertomaan digitalisoinnista avointa lähdekoodia hyödyntäen. Koko konferenssin ohjelma löytyy täältä.
Gael Langevin open source 3d print robot

Tarkkaavaisen huomion mukaan Elon Muskin avoimen lähdekoodin Tesla-sähköautot alkavat olla vanhaa maailmaa, kun nykyään jokainen itseään kunnioittava teknologia-enthusiasti 3d-tulostaa itselleen robotin, jonka voi herättää henkiin avoimella koodilla. Keynote-puhujana Gael Langevin.

“Kaiken kaikkiaan tapahtumaan toivotaan monipuolista kattausta avoimella mielellä olevia kävijöitä, joita yhdistää kiinnostus avoimiin teknologioihin nyt ja tulevaisuudessa. Mikäli kiinnostuit niin ennakkolipun ehtii hankkia vielä 23.8 mennessä. Tervetuloa!” toivottaa konferenssin viestintäpäällikkö Moona Puha Coss ry:stä. OKFFI järjestää konferenssiin kiinnostuksen mukaan yhteislähdön Helsingistä -yhteydenotot Raimo Muuriseen (ät okf.fi, 044-5777 574) tai Teemu Ropposeen. The post Mindtrek Openmind kokoaa avoimuustoimijat Tampereelle syyskuussa appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Ushahidi i Nepal – Hur öppna data och crowdsourcing räddar liv

Mathias Antonsson - May 28, 2015 in Internationellt, Open Data, Open Source, ushahidi

Ushahidi   Plötsligt skakar världen. Som uppväxt i Nepal har du fått berättat för dig att det bara var en tidsfråga innan jordbävningen skulle komma, det utgör dock ingen tröst när verkligheten hinner ikapp. Vi vet idag att över 8000 människor förlorade sina liv. Jag förstår lyckligtvis inte personligen skräcken som ofrånkomligen måste följa, då jag själv bara upplevt mindre jordbävningar. Däremot förstår jag frågorna. Jag bor bara ett par hundra meter från Westgate, den galleria i Kenyas huvudstad Nairobi som attackerades av terrorister i september 2013 med dödlig utgång. Vad händer? Vad är det för oväsen? Var är min familj? Mina vänner? Vad är klockan? Var borde dem hålla hus nu? Var är min telefon? Varför svarar dem inte? Vad skall jag göra nu? Förvirring. Oro. Rädsla. När klarheten så smått börjar återkomma och det värsta adrenalinet lagt sig, frågar en del av oss hur vi kan hjälpa till. Mängden saker som behövs i dessa situationer är oräkneliga, allt från en hand att hålla, till vatten, bloddonationer, information och storskaliga räddningsinsatser. För allt detta krävs koordination. Det är där Ushahidi kommer in. Där vi spelar roll. Där Ushahidi räddar liv. Jag har fått privilegiet att skriva en serie gästbloggar för Open Knowledge Sweden, och kommer i dessa att exemplifiera hur vi bidrar i humanitära kriser från Syrien och Ukraina till Nepal. Hur vi har utvecklat produkter såsom Ushahidi som kartlägger och organiserar crowdsourcad information, eller PingApp som snabbt kontaktar och ger dig information om statusen på dina vänner eller kollegor när krisen är ett faktum. Jag kommer även beröra hur det är att jobba i en världsledande liten organisation med huvudkontor i Nairobi, långt från vår svenska trygghet och trendiga New York där jag tidigare bott och arbetat. Men en sak i taget. Vi börjar från början. Varför är öppen data och crowdsourcing relevant i en krissituation? Hur kan det bidra till att rädda liv? Den 25e april i år förändrades livet för många i Nepal för alltid. Somliga var bara inom ett par minuter bortom räddning. Andra hade fortfarande en chans, men det måste gå fort. I Nepal agerade Kathmandu Living Labs (KLL) direkt. De satte upp ett tillfälligt kriscenter, utomhus, för att minska risken för att själva fastna i rasmassor under efterskalven. Deras arbete att genom öppna data kartlägga Nepal intensifierades, och dem crowdsourceade information för att förstå var rasen var som värst, var människor satt fast, var vägar hade rasat, var det fanns vattenbrist etc. Allt lades upp på en karta, öppen för alla, men i krisens grepp främst för räddningspersonal. Information är makt, information räddar liv. Desto mer du vet ju bättre kan du planera, prioritera och utföra en räddningsaktion. Enkelheten är nyckeln. Tillgång till information såsom öppna data, och tillgång till mjukvara som kan sortera och organisera information från en mängd källor såsom sms, Twitter, Flickr etc. gör skillnad. Stor skillnad.
Ushahidi_Nepal

Skärmdump av kartan med rapporter

Mjukvaran de använde var Ushahidis flaggskepp, kallat just Ushahidi. I vår globala värld är det kanske inga konstigheter att en produkt utvecklad i Nairobi, som användes av FN och räddningsorganisationer redan under den stora jordbävningen på Haiti 2010, kan användas var och när som helst, särskilt som det är en open source produkt, men det gav mig kalla kårar. En stolthet bara överträffad av den för min vän från New York som idag flyttat hem till sitt Nepal och var instrumental i KLLs arbete. Till syvende och sist handlar det om människor. Dem som moder natur håller gisslan, dem som fritas av de som under hennes hot tvingas jobba utomhus.   Mathias Antonsson
| @plurrify Läs mer om jordbävningen i Nepal här:
BBC: How ‘crisis mapping’ is helping relief efforts in Nepal
Wired: Nepal’s Aid System Is Broken. So These Lifesavers Hacked It
Nepali Times: Mapping the aftermath