You are browsing the archive for open.

The Open Revolution: rewriting the rules of the information age

- June 12, 2018 in News, open, Open Data, Open Knowledge, Open/Closed

Rufus Pollock, the Founder of Open Knowledge International, is delighted to announce the launch of his new book The Open Revolution on how we can revolutionize information ownership and access in the digital economy.

About the book

Will the digital revolution give us digital dictatorships or digital democracies? Forget everything you think you know about the digital age. It’s not about privacy, surveillance, AI or blockchain – it’s about ownership. Because, in a digital age, who owns information controls the future.

Today, information is everywhere. From your DNA to the latest blockbusters, from lifesaving drugs to the app on your phone, from big data to algorithms. Our entire global economy is built on it and the rules around information affect us all every day.

As information continues to move into the digital domain, it can be copied and distributed with ease, making access and control even more important. But the rules we have made for it, derived from how we manage physical property, are hopelessly maladapted to the digital world.

In The Open Revolution, Pollock exposes the myths that cloud the digital debate. Looking beneath the surface, into the basic rules of the digital economy, he offers a simple solution. The answer is not technological but political: a choice between making information Open, shared by all, or making it Closed, exclusively owned and controlled. Today in a Closed world we find ourselves at the mercy of digital dictators. Rufus Pollock charts a path to a more “Open” future that works for everyone.
Cory Doctorow, journalist and activist: “The richest, most powerful people in the world have bet everything on the control of information in all its guises; Pollock’s fast-moving, accessible book explains why seizing the means of attention and information is the only path to human freedom and flourishing.”

An Open future for all

The book’s vision of choosing Open as the path to a more equitable, innovative and profitable future for all is closely related to the vision of an open knowledge society of Open Knowledge International. Around the world, we are working towards societies where everyone has access to key information and the ability to use it to understand and shape their lives. We want to see powerful institutions made comprehensible and accountable. We want to see vital research information which can help us tackle challenges such as poverty and climate change available to all as open information. The Open Revolution is a great inspiration for our worldwide network of people passionate about openness, boosting our shared efforts towards an open future for all.
Get the book and join the open revolution at openrevolution.net, or join our forum to discuss the book’s content.

About the author

Dr Rufus Pollock is a researcher, technologist and entrepreneur. He has been a pioneer in the global Open Data movement, advising national governments, international organisations and industry on how to succeed in the digital world. He is the founder of Open Knowledge, a leading NGO which is present in over 35 countries, empowering people and organization with access to information so that they can create insight and drive change. Formerly, he was the Mead Fellow in Economics at Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge. He has been the recipient of a $1m Shuttleworth Fellowship and is currently an Ashoka Fellow and Fellow of the RSA. He holds a PhD in Economics and a double first in Mathematics from the University of Cambridge.
 

The Open Revolution: rewriting the rules of the information age

- June 12, 2018 in News, open, Open Data, Open Knowledge, Open/Closed

Rufus Pollock, the Founder of Open Knowledge International, is delighted to announce the launch of his new book The Open Revolution on how we can revolutionize information ownership and access in the digital economy.

About the book

Will the digital revolution give us digital dictatorships or digital democracies? Forget everything you think you know about the digital age. It’s not about privacy, surveillance, AI or blockchain – it’s about ownership. Because, in a digital age, who owns information controls the future.

Today, information is everywhere. From your DNA to the latest blockbusters, from lifesaving drugs to the app on your phone, from big data to algorithms. Our entire global economy is built on it and the rules around information affect us all every day.

As information continues to move into the digital domain, it can be copied and distributed with ease, making access and control even more important. But the rules we have made for it, derived from how we manage physical property, are hopelessly maladapted to the digital world.

In The Open Revolution, Pollock exposes the myths that cloud the digital debate. Looking beneath the surface, into the basic rules of the digital economy, he offers a simple solution. The answer is not technological but political: a choice between making information Open, shared by all, or making it Closed, exclusively owned and controlled. Today in a Closed world we find ourselves at the mercy of digital dictators. Rufus Pollock charts a path to a more “Open” future that works for everyone.
Cory Doctorow, journalist and activist: “The richest, most powerful people in the world have bet everything on the control of information in all its guises; Pollock’s fast-moving, accessible book explains why seizing the means of attention and information is the only path to human freedom and flourishing.”

An Open future for all

The book’s vision of choosing Open as the path to a more equitable, innovative and profitable future for all is closely related to the vision of an open knowledge society of Open Knowledge International. Around the world, we are working towards societies where everyone has access to key information and the ability to use it to understand and shape their lives. We want to see powerful institutions made comprehensible and accountable. We want to see vital research information which can help us tackle challenges such as poverty and climate change available to all as open information. The Open Revolution is a great inspiration for our worldwide network of people passionate about openness, boosting our shared efforts towards an open future for all.
Get the book and join the open revolution at openrevolution.net, or join our forum to discuss the book’s content.

About the author

Dr Rufus Pollock is a researcher, technologist and entrepreneur. He has been a pioneer in the global Open Data movement, advising national governments, international organisations and industry on how to succeed in the digital world. He is the founder of Open Knowledge, a leading NGO which is present in over 35 countries, empowering people and organization with access to information so that they can create insight and drive change. Formerly, he was the Mead Fellow in Economics at Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge. He has been the recipient of a $1m Shuttleworth Fellowship and is currently an Ashoka Fellow and Fellow of the RSA. He holds a PhD in Economics and a double first in Mathematics from the University of Cambridge.
 

Solving the Internet Monopolies Problem – Facebook, Google et al

- May 9, 2018 in open, Open Knowledge Definition, Open/Closed

The good news is that an increasing number of people seem to agree that:
  1. Facebook, Google etc are monopolies
  2. That is a problem
Agreeing we have a problem is always a crucial first step. But to go further we need to:
  1. Correctly diagnose the disease — in particular, avoid confusing the symptoms with the root cause
  2. Identify a cure that actually works
On point one, the answer is that he root cause is costless copying (plus platform effects) combined with monopoly rights. Costless copying (and platform effects) would always lead to some kind of standardization — witness the Internet. But that is not a problem — in fact it is advantage to have a single standard. The problem arises when the standard platform is owned by one entity and becomes a monopoly as we have today with Google in search, Facebook in social networking etc. The solution flows from the diagnosis: make these platforms open and have an open-compatible, market-oriented way to pay innovators (i.e. have remuneration rights). By make a platform open I mean make its protocols, algorithms, software and know-how open, free to all to use, build on and share. More details on all of this in my upcoming book: http://rufuspollock.com/book

Photo by Jonas Lee on Unsplash

An example of a mis-diagnosis: their control of our personal data

One prevalent misdiagnosis is that the issue with Facebook and Google and the source of (much) of their monopoly power is to do with their control of our personal data. See, for example, the Economist’s cover in May 2017 showing Internet monopolies as oil rigs mining personal data – an allusion to the common assertion that “personal data is the new oil”.

From this mis-diagnosis flows a proposed solution: limit Facebook and Google’s access to our personal data and/or ensure others have access to that personal data on equal terms (“data portability”). Data portability means almost nothing in a world where you have a dominant network. So what if I can get my data out of Facebook if no other network has a critical mass of participants. What is needed is that Facebook has a live, open read/write API that allows other platforms to connect if authorized by the user. In fact, personal data is a practical irrelevancies to the monopoly issue. Focusing on it serves only to distract us from the real solutions. Limiting Facebook’s and Google’s access to our personal data or making it more portable would make very little difference to their monopoly power, or reduce the deleterious effects of that power on innovation and freedom — the key freedoms of enterprise, choice and thought. It make little difference because their monopoly just doesn’t arise from their access to our personal data. Instead it comes from massive economies of scale (costless copying) plus platform effects. If you removed Google’s and Facebook’s ability to use personal data to target ads tomorrow it would make very little difference to their top or bottom lines because their monopoly on our attention would be little changed and their ad targeting would be little diminished — in Google’s case the fact you type in a specific search from a particular location is already enough to target effectively and similar Facebook’s knowledge of your broad demographic characteristics would be enough given the lock-hold they have on our online attention. What is needed in Google’s case is openness of the platform and in Facebook’s openness combined with guaranteed interoperability (“data portability” means little if everyone is on Facebook!). Worse, focusing on privacy actually reinforces their monopoly position. It does so because privacy concerns:

  • Increase compliance costs which burden less wealthy competitors disproportionately. In particular, increased compliance costs make it harder for new firms to enter the market. A classic example is the “right to be forgotten” which actually makes it harder for alternative search firms to compete with Google.
  • Make it harder to get (permitted) access to user data on the platform and it is precisely (user-permitted) read/write access to a platform’s data that is the best chance for competition. In fact, it now gives monopolists the perfect excuse to deny such access: Facebook can now deny other competing firms (user-permitted) access to user data citing “privacy concerns”.

An example of a misguided solution: build a new open-source decentralized social network

Similarly, the idea sometimes put forward that we just need another open-source decentralized social network is completely implausible (even if run by Tim Berners-Lee*). Platforms/networks like Facebook tend to standardize: witness phone networks, postal networks, electricity networks and even the Internet. We don’t want lots of incompatible social networks. We want one open one — just like we have one open Internet. In addition, the idea that some open-source decentralized effort is going to take on an entrenched highly resourced monopoly on its own is ludicrous (the only hope would be if there was serious state assistance and regulation — just in the way that China got its own social networks by effectively excluding Facebook). Instead, in the case of Facebook we need to address the monopoly at root: networks like this will always tend to standardization. The solution is ensure that we get an open rather than closed, proprietary global social network — just like we got with the open Internet. Right now that would mean enforcing equal access rights to facebook API for competitors or, enforcing full open sourcing of key parts of the software and tech stack plus getting guarantees ongoing non-discriminatory API access. Even more importantly we need to prevent these kind of monopolies in future — we want to stop shutting the door after the horse has bolted! This means systematic funding of open protocols and platforms. By open i mean the software, algorithms and non-personal data are open. And we need to fund the innovators who create and develop these and the way to do that is replacing patents/copyright with remuneration rights.

Fake news: confusing which symptoms are related to which disease

We must also be careful not to confuse which symptoms are related to which disease. For example, fake news *is* a problem but it is only tangentially related to the disease of monopoly. The causes of fake news are many and various and much more complex than simple monopoly. In fact, one could argue that more diversity in media actually makes echo chambers worse. Reducing monopoly at Facebook and Google level may bring *some* improvement but it is probably secondary. For more, see https://rufuspollock.com/2016/11/26/fake-news-post-truth—is-it-news-and-what-can-we-do/
* see as an example of just this kind of proposal https://meanjin.com.au/essays/the-last-days-of-reality/

Requiem for an Internet Dream

- December 12, 2017 in Internet, open, Open/Closed

The dream of the Internet is dying. Killed by its children. We have barely noticed its demise and done even less to save it. It was a dream of openness, of unprecedented technological and social freedom to connect and innovate. Whilst expressed in technology, it was a dream that was, in essence, political and social. A dream of equality of opportunity, of equality of standing, and of liberty. A world where anyone could connect and almost everyone did. No-one controlled or owned the Internet; no one person or group decided who got on it or who didn’t. It was open to all. But that dream is dying. Whilst the Internet will continue in its literal, physical sense, its spirit is disappearing. In its place, we are getting a technological infrastructure dominated by a handful of platforms which are proprietary, centralized and monopolized. Slowly, subtly, we no longer directly access the Net. Instead, we live within the cocoons created by the Internet’s biggest children. No longer do you go online: you go on Facebook or you Google something. In those cocoons we seem happy, endlessly-scrolling through our carefully curated feeds, barely, if ever, needing to venture beyond those safe blue walls to the Net beyond. And if not on Facebook, we’ll be on Google, our friendly guide to the overwhelming, unruly hinterlands of the untamed Net. Like Facebook, Google is helpfully ensuring that we need never leave, that everything is right there on its pages. They are hoovering up more and more websites into the vastness that is the Googleplex. Chopping them up and giving them back to us in the bite-sized morsels we need. Soon we will never need to go elsewhere, not even to Wikipedia, because Google will have helpfully integrated whatever it was we needed; the only things left will be the advertisers who have something to sell (and who Google need to pay them). As the famous Microsoft mantra went: embrace, extend, extinguish. Facebook, Google, Apple and the like have done this beautifully, aided by our transition back from the browser to the walled garden of mobile. And this achievement is all the more ironic for its unintended nature; if questioned, Facebook and Google would honestly protest their innocence. Let me be clear, this is not a requiem for some half-warm libertarianism. The Internet is not a new domain, and it must play by laws and jurisdictions of the states in which it lives. I am no subscriber to independence declarations or visions of brave new worlds. What I mourn is something both smaller and bigger. The disappearance of something rare and special: proof that digital was different, that platforms at a planetary scale could be open, and that from that magical combination of tech and openness something special flowed. Not only speech and freedom of speech, but also innovation and creativity in all its wondrous fecundity and generous, organized chaos on a scale previously unimagined. And we must understand that the death of this dream was not inevitable. It is why I hesitate to use the word dream. Dreams always fade in the morning; we always wake up. This was not so much a dream as possibility. A delicate one, and a rare one. After all, the history of technology and innovation is full of proprietary platforms and exclusive control — of domination by the one or the few. The Internet was different. It was like language: available to all, almost as a birthright. And in the intoxicating rush of discovery we neglected to realise how rare it was. What a strange and wonderful set of circumstances had caused its birth: massive, far-sighted government investment at DARPA, an incubation in an open-oriented academia, maturity before anyone realised its commercial importance, and its lucky escape in the 1990s from control by the likes of AOL or MSN. And then, as the web took off, it was free, so clearly, unarguably, and powerfully valuable for its openness that none could directly touch it. The Internet’s power was not a result of technology but of a social and political choice. The choice of openness. The fact that every single major specification of how the Internet worked was open and free for anyone to use. That production grade implementations of those specifications were available as open software — thanks to government support. That a rich Internet culture grew that acknowledged and valued that openness, along with the bottom-up, informal innovation that went with it. We must see this, because even if it is too late to save the Internet dream, we can use our grief to inspire a renewed commitment to the openness that was its essence, to open information and open platforms. And so, even as we take off our hats to watch the Internet pass in all its funereal splendour, in our hearts we can have hope that its dream will live again.

Center for Open Science Workshop at University of Cincinnati

- March 12, 2015 in Center for Open Science, Center for Open Science Workshop, Communites, News, open, Planet, Ubuntu, Ubuntu Scientists, University of Cincinnati, Workshop

The main library of university that I go to, University of Cincinnati, hosted a workshop from Center for Open Science on March 12th.  The workshop was over reproducible research practices and how can Open Science help it- mainly with the Center of Open Science’s framework.  Since I’m a (clueless) biology undergrad with barely any research experience, I learned a lot from it and new things, again mainly with their framework. I heard of the Center and their framework about a year ago and I had no clue of how to test it or even use it for something.  But after this workshop, I think I may have an idea for a personal or a Ubuntu Scientists (or another Open Science group) project to work on improving/teaching documentation for research or another aspect/step of the process.  I also want to figure out how to do outreach also.

Puhdas mieli ja pöydällinen ideoita

- March 6, 2015 in academic, avoin, avoin data, avoin glam, avoinglam, Conference, coss, democracy, event, Events, Featured, GLAM, license, Licenses, mindtrek, Mindtrek Openmind, okffi, open, Open Content, Open Data, Open Democracy, Open GLAM, open license, Open Science, Open Source, openmind, Tampere

Mindsweep Tampere.

Tamperen Mindsweep-sessiossa videoa kuvannut Mindtrek Openmindin markkinointitiimin Emile Chauvinin päätyi kesken työnteon kollega Hannele Kedon kameran eteen. Taustalla työryhmä pohtii tapahtuman pelillistämistä.

Maaliskuun ensimmäinen viikko päättyi Tampereella ja Helsingissä järjestettyihin Mindtrek Openmind Mindsweep -sessioihin. Open Knowledge Finland on Suomen avoimien järjestelmien keskus COSS:in mukana järjestämässä vuoden suurinta avoimuustapahtumaa. “Joukkoistamisessa on olennaista yhdistää kasvokkainen vuorovaikutus ja verkon käyttö saumattomasti. Sessio on koknaan avoin vasta kun ajatukset kirjataan suoralta kädeltä verkkoon kenen tahansa luettavaksi ja kommentoitavaksi” sanoo joukkoistamista vetävä OKFFI:n Raimo Muurinen.
Mindsweep Tampere

Ajatus on hyvä kun se ei jätä ketään kylmäksi, vaan vaikka jakaa mielipiteet. COSS:in Olli Purma (vas) vaikuttaa mietteliäältä ja OKFFI:n Raimo Muurinen tyytväiseltä ideasession keskusteluun.

Mindsweep on tapahtuma, jossa osallistujat tyhjentävät ajatuksensa paperille -tai koneelle. Ensisijaisen tärkeää on välttää turhaa itsekritiikkiä. “Ihmisillä on taipumusta itsekriittisyyteen ja hyväksynnän hakemiseen saman pöydän ääressä istuvilta. Nyt painotimme kuitenkin määrää ohitse laadun. Ideoiden laittaminen paremmuus- ja toteuttamisjärjestykseen seuraa vasta seuraavassa vaiheessa ja tapahtuu kaikille yhteisesti verkossa” Muurinen jatkaa. Joukkoistamisen ensimmäinen vaihe eli ideakuulutus päätty maanantaina 16.3. Siihen asti kuka tahansa voi mindtrek.org -sivuston kautta ehdottaa minkälaista tahansa ideaa konferenssin ohjelmaksi tai mihin tahansa muuhun asiaan, kuten vaikka tunnelmaan tai markkinointiin liittyen. Niin kutsuttu Program Admin Team käy ideat läpi ja pyrkii törmäyttämään samankaltaisten ideoiden esittäjät yhteen. Joukkoistamisen toinen vaihe on torstaina 19.3. aukeava Call for Participation. Jälkimmäisessä vaiheessa osallistujilta pyydetään sitovia ehdotuksia ohjelmasisällön järjestämiseksi.
Mindsweep Tampere.

Tampereen Mindsweep järjestettiin Tampereen ydinkeskustassa Life Centren tiloissa Hämeenkadun ja Rautatienkadun kulmassa, josta oli suora näköyhteys Mindtrek Openmindin tapahtumapaikalle Hotelli Torniin, jota leikkisästi joskus Barad-dûriksi kutsutaan.

Avoin korruptionvastainen sauna ja muut ideat

Ideakuulutuksen tulokset löytyvät Trello-palvelusta Call for ideas -boardilta eli “pöydältä”. Vielä ennen Tampereen sessiota sieltä löytyi vain muutamia ideakortteja. Helsingin Mindsweepin päätteeksi pöytä on nyt täynnä monenkirjavia ajatuksia. Yksi session aikana OKFFI:n Antti Poikolan ja Jaakko Korhosen työstämä ehdotus on Open Sauna. Ketterät avoimen datan aktiivit kirjoittivat avoimen saunan konseptin auki ja tekivät saman tien ilmoittautumislomakkeen ja varasivat osoitteen konseptille. Avoin Sauna on Open Knowledge Festivalilla pari vuotta aiemmin kokeiltu konsepti, jossa paikallisilta firmoilta ja muilta joukkoistetaan saunoja yhden illan mittaiseen monessa paikassa samaan aikaan tapahtuvaan saunomiseen. Saunat aukeavat kaikille tapahtuman osallistujille ja auttavat ihmisiä riisumaan tittelinsä ja puhumaan suoraan ja avoimesti.
Mindsweep Call for Ideas Trello

Helsingin Mindsweep-session jälkeen Trello oli täyttynyt ideoista. Joskin koska netistä ei tilan pitäisi loppua heti kesken, vielä mahtuu uusia mukaan.

Keskustelun aikana ääneen lausuttiin monenlaisia muitakin ehdotuksia. Esimerkiksi avoimien järjestelmien hankintaosaaminen, avoimet tarjoukset, datan kulun näkyväksi tekeminen esineiden internetissä, speed dating osaajille ja rekryäjille, pohjoismainen avoimen datan yhteisö ja vertaistalous. Kaikki kortit löytyvät ja ovat kommentoitavissa sekä muokattavissa Ideakuulutuksen Trellossa. Käy osallistumassa! The post Puhdas mieli ja pöydällinen ideoita appeared first on OKFN LOCAL: Finland.

Mindtrek Openmind Call for Ideas auki 25.2.

- February 25, 2015 in avoin data, Conference, convention, coss, Data, event, Events, Featured, festival, knowledge, Mindtrek Openmind, OKF, okffi, open, Open Content, Open Data, Open Knowledge, Open Source, Tampere

Mindtrek Openmind 2015 Open Knowledge Finland ja Suomen avoimien tietojärjestelmien keskus Coss sopivat yhteistyöstä vuoden 2015 Mindtrek Openmind -konferenssin järjestämiseksi syyskuussa Tampereella. Tapahtuma on OKFFI:n kuluvan vuoden päätapahtuma. “OKFFI:llä on laaja asiantuntemus avoimien tapahtumien järjestämisestä ja yhteisöllisyydestä. Toiveena olisi saada OKFFI:stä pidempiaikainen kumppani ja tarjota heille mahdollisuutta tuoda omat käytäntönsä ja verkostonsa mukaan tapahtumaan” sanoo Cossin toiminnanjohtaja Timo Väliharju. Tänään keskiviikkona 25. helmikuuta aukeaa konferenssin ideakuulutus, Call for Ideas. Tapahtumalla on melkein 20-vuotinen historia, mutta joukkoistamista ei ole toteutettu aiemmin näin alkuvaiheessa ja laajasti. Kuka tahansa voi ehdottaa periaatteessa mitä tahansa ohjelmasisältöä tai muuta toiminnallisuutta ja osallistua yhteiskehittelyyn. Huhtikuussa seuraa Call for Participation, jossa pyydetään sitovia ehdotuksia tapahtuman järjestämiseksi. Ideakuulutuksesta kiinnostuneet kokoontuvat Mindsweep-sessioon Tampereella torstaina 5.3. klo 15 ja Helsingissä perjantaina 6.3. klo 15. Tervetuloa!

Vuosikokous siirtyy, tilalle 24.2. 16.00 strategia- ja valmistelusessio

- February 20, 2015 in annual meeting, avoin data, democracy, event, Events, Featured, knowledge, kokous, meeting, Official meeting, okffi, open, Open Data, Open Democracy, Open Knowledge, vuosikokous

Hallitus on päättänyt siirtää OKFFI:n vuosikokouksen perjantaille 20.3.2015. Vuosikokousasiakirjojen valmistelu osoittautui ennakoitua aikaavievämmäksi prosessiksi. Tiistaina 24.2. klo 16.00 kokoonnutaan kuitenkin Lasipalatsin Kaupunkiverstaalle strategia- ja valmistelusessioon. Tuolloin työstetään toimintakertomusta, tulevaa toimintasuunnitelmaa ja talousarviota. Tilaisuus on avoin niin kaikille yhdistyksen jäsenille kuin uusille kiinnostuneille.
Strategia- ja suunnittelupalaveri pidetään Helsingin ydinkeskustassa Lasipalatsin 2. kerroksessa Kaupunkiverstaalla.

Strategia- ja suunnittelupalaveri pidetään Helsingin ydinkeskustassa Lasipalatsin 2. kerroksessa Kaupunkiverstaalla.

Vuosikokouksella on oma sivunsa, josta löytyy kokouskutsu sekä materiaalit. Esityslista, säännöt ja tilinpäätös ja talousarvio ovat jo keskeneräisinäkin kaikille avoimia verkkodokumentteja, joita voi vähintään lukea ja kommentoida, mutta usein myös muokata. OKFFI:ssä uskotaan ja luotetaan avoimeen yhteisölliseen toimintakulttuuriin. Näin aika ja energia voidaan ohjata suoraan tekemiseen eikä esimerkiksi asiakirjojen edestakaiseen lähettelyyn sähköpostilla ja vähämerkityksisten yksityiskohtien kanssa painiskeluun. Vuosikokoukseen voi osallistua niin paikan päällä kuin etänä. Etä-äänestysoikeutta varten pitää ilmoittautua ennakkoon viimeistään keskiviikkona 18.3. Paikan päälle voi tulla ilmoittautumattakin, mutta toki ilmoittautuminen on toivottavaa. Jos olet kiinnostunut hallitustehtävistä, puheenjohtajuudesta tai vapaaehtoisesta core-tiimin jäsenyydetä, voit ilmoittautua ennakkoon tällä lomakkeella. Samalla pääset näkemään muut kiinnostuksensa ilmoittaneet. Vuosikokouksen jälkeen on tarjolla avoin sauna, tervetuloa!

Planet Open Science Now Open

- February 12, 2015 in Communites, okfn, OKFN Open Science, open, Open Science, Planet

In this post, I talked about building a Planet Open Science to collect the various posts from members of the Open Science community and I’m happy to announce that it is ready to use.  I created a thread where those who want to add their feed to the Planet can do so.  You can also use this contact form: [contact-form] Home page of Planet Open Science

From Intrigued to Interested- What is Need to Get People in a Movement?

- December 28, 2014 in Comminutes, Communites, Lou Woodley, Movement, okfn, OKFN Open Science, open, Open Notebook Science

In Lou Woodley’s blog, I saw an post about what is needed to sustain a movement.  There was one thing that is missing, at least to me, and that is getting people intrigued about the movement and it’s projects.  One of the easiest ways to get people intrigued is the use of tools that collect information in one place.  Three of tools are: ‘Planet’  Feed Aggregator Going back to this post, this tool is a good one to collect all of the blog posts from those who have agreed for their posted to be imported via feed reader.  This allows new comers to see what various people are doing within that community and connect with them. OKFN Open Science working group started to work on one which should be ready to be used in early 2015. Calendar/Directory As one tool, this allows new comers to find events and people that are in that community/movement.  The only one example of a possible usage is within the OKFN Open Science working group [1,2] which should be also ready in 2015. [1] http://discuss.okfn.org/t/open-science-calendar/96 [2] http://discuss.okfn.org/t/open-science-open-knowledge-directory/95 Resource List/Guide This can be done via a wiki or other ways.  This tool allows new comers to easily see what projects/communities are within that movement.  One example is OARR: Open Access and Reproducible Research Compendium. There are other tools out there but these are my top ones that should be used to generate more reason to join a movement.
  Afterthought: I misread the title but I think it might be the same thing (intrigued and interested). I don’t know how I saw it as two different things. Maybe there are as levels. Update: I told Lou Woodley about my post and she said,
Thanks. I think intrigued is probably the beginning stage of getting interested in something. I’ve been reading a bit about pyramids of engagement and “conversion funnels” recently too and those involve more than three stages, meaning that most stages are not entirely distinct from the previous or following stage.