You are browsing the archive for OpenGLAM.

Protecting libraries and the vital role they play in local communities

- February 27, 2019 in Events, library, Open GLAM, OpenGLAM

This article was originally published in The Scotsman. With councils across the UK facing major financial pressures, libraries are too often seen as an easy target for cuts. In 2017, it is estimated that more than 120 libraries closed their doors in England, Wales and Scotland. That figure is likely to have increased last year. Thousands of jobs have also been lost, with libraries’ existence more reliant on volunteers than ever before. But closing down a library has to be one of the most short-sighted decisions that public officials can make, with serious consequences for the future of local communities. There is a widespread misconception that the services offered are out-of-date – a relic of a bygone age before youngsters started carrying smartphones in their pockets with instant access to Wikipedia, and before they started downloading books on their Kindle. But a recent study by the Carnegie UK Trust found that people aged 15-24 in England are the most likely age group to use libraries. And nearly half of people aged 25 to 34 still visit them, according to the study. Today, the most successful libraries have remodelled themselves to become fit for the 21st century, and more can follow suit if they receive the right support and advice, and have the backing of governments and councils. I am encouraged by the Scottish Government’s support for adequate library services across Scotland. Tomorrow, the tenth EDGE conference held by Edinburgh City Libraries will be held in the capital, where library experts from across the globe will gather to share good practice and discuss future developments. Everyone attending shares the same belief that libraries offer crucial support to help people help themselves – to support literacy, digital participation, learning, employability, health, culture and leisure. As a former MEP who founded the European Parliament’s All-Party Library group, I’m delighted to be attending this event in my new role as chief executive of Open Knowledge International. As experts in opening up knowledge, we help governments, universities, and civil society organisations reach their full potential by providing them with skills and tools to publish, use, and understand data. Part of our role involves delivering technology solutions which are particularly relevant for libraries. One of our initiatives is called OpenGLAM, a global network that works to open up content and data held by galleries, libraries, archives and museums. All over the world, libraries are coming up with new ideas to make them relevant for the modern age. Take virtual reality as an example, which is arguably the most important innovation since the smartphone. It not only provides a source of fun and entertainment but it has also become a platform to explore science, nature, history, geography and so much more. You no longer have to pick up a book in a library to learn about the Himalayas, the Great Barrier Reef or the Grand Canyon – you can explore them in virtual reality. You can learn by time travelling back to a prehistoric age or go forward into the yet undiscovered possibilities of the future. Virtual technology can also be used to visit places that humans can never travel to other than in the Hollywood world of Ant-Man – deep inside the body to a cellular level for example. And technology can be used to examine the impact of humankind on our natural world, particularly the consequences of climate change. I have long championed the importance of coding as part of the education curriculum, especially given that Scotland is home to more than 100,000 digital tech economy jobs. But while there remains a shortfall in what is delivered in our schools, libraries can fill that gap. Our world is moulded in code, and libraries offer young people an opportunity to bring ideas to life and build things that will bring joy to millions. So by embracing the future, they can continue to be an unrivalled place of learning, like they always were for previous generations. But libraries are much more than just places to learn. They are part of the fabric of a local community. At the EDGE conference we will hear from Henrik Jochumsen of the University of Copenhagen about the Danish ‘three-function model’ for libraries: as a place, as a space and as relations. Libraries can serve as a catalyst for change and urban development and build new creative partnerships in towns and cities, which in turn create vibrant, liveable and coherent communities. We will also hear about the Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina, which has transformed into a ‘studio’ – meaning a meeting room with four walls can be a computer lab, storytime room, homework centre, book club, stage and theatre, all in one day. Last year, Liverpool Central Library was named the Bookseller’s Library of the Year in the UK. Its success, which has resulted in a steady increase in customers, stems from the decision to make the building part of the community, with events where people create art projects, and late-night openings until midnight. And being part of the community means providing a service to every single member of that community. While some people in society become ever more marginalised, there is a job to be done to ensure that digital library services are more inclusive to all, including people with disabilities. And as more people live into old age, libraries can play vital role as a dementia friendly space. They also provide an important resource for migrant families to develop their reading skills with access to dual language titles. Public libraries have been at the heart of our communities for decades, and I dearly hope that continues for decades to come. And with technological advancements, they can become more useful than ever before. But their success is also dependent on those in a position of power recognising their worth.

Celebrating the public domain in 2019

- January 29, 2019 in open culture, Open GLAM, OpenGLAM, Policy, Public Domain

2019 is a special year for the public domain, the out-of-copyright material that everyone is free to enjoy, share, and build upon without restriction. Normally, each year on the 1st of January a selection of works (books, films, artworks, musical scores and more) enter the public domain because their copyright expires – which is most commonly 70 years after the creator’s death depending on where in the world you are. This year, for the first time in more than twenty years, new material entered the public domain in the US, namely all works that were published in the year 1923. Due to complicated legal proceedings, the last new release of public domain material in the US was in 1998, for all works dating from 1922. But from now on, each following year we will expect to see a new batch of material freed of copyright restrictions (so content from the year 1924 will become available from 2020 onwards, content from 1925 in 2021, and so on). This is good news for everyone, since the availability of such open cultural data enables citizens from across the world to enjoy this material, understand their cultural heritage and re-use it to produce new works of art. The Public Domain Review, an online journal & not-for-profit project dedicated to promoting and celebrating the public domain, curated their Class of 2019: a top pick of artists and writers whose works entered the public domain this year. A full overview of the 2019 release is available here. A great way to celebrate this public domain content in 2019 could be to organise events, workshops or hackathons using this material on Open Data Day, the annual celebration of open data on Saturday 2 March 2019. If you are planning an event, you can add it to the global map via the Open Data Day registration form. Coinciding with this mass release of public domain works, the Public Domain Manifesto that was been produced within the context of COMMUNIA, the European Thematic Network on the digital public domain, has now been made available via a renewed website at publicdomainmanifesto.org. Describing the public domain material as “raw material from which new knowledge is derived and new cultural works are created”, the manifesto aims to stress the importance of the wealth of the public domain to both citizens and policy-makers, to make sure its legal basis remains strong and everyone will be able to access and reuse the material in the future. The manifesto describes the key principles that are needed to actively maintain the public domain and the voluntary commons in our society, for example to keep public domain works in the Public Domain by not claiming exclusive rights to technical reproductions of works. It also formulates a number of recommendations to protect the public domain from legal obstacles and assure it can function to the benefit of education, cultural heritage and scientific research in a meaningful way. There are currently over 3.000 signatures of the manifesto, but additional support is important to strengthen the movement: you show your support by signing the Public Domain Manifesto here.

Do you use OpenGLAM? Help review shared #OpenGLAM principles for Open Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums

- October 15, 2018 in open culture, Open GLAM, OpenGLAM, Survey

TL;DR: As part of reinvigorating our OpenGLAM (Open Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums) community, we’re evaluating the OpenGLAM principles: fill out this survey and get involved. Several months ago, community members from Wikimedia, Open Knowledge International and Creative Commons reinvigorated the “OpenGLAM” initiative. OpenGLAM is a global network of people and organizations who are working to open up content and data held by Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums. As a community of practice, OpenGLAM incorporates ongoing efforts to disseminate knowledge and culture through policies and practices that encourage broad communities of participation, and integrates them with the needs and activities of professional communities working at GLAM institutions. One of our first steps was to revitalize the @openglam twitter account, inviting contributors from different parts of the world to showcase and highlight the way in which “OpenGLAM” is being understood in different contexts. So far, the Twitter account has had contributors from Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, North America & Europe. Anyone can become a contributor or suggest someone to contribute by signing up through this form. If you want to see the content that has been shared through the account, you can check the oa.glam tag in the Open Access Tracking Project. Now, as we move forward in planning more activities, we want to check on the continued impact of the Open GLAM Principles. Since their publication in 2013, the Open GLAM principles offered a declaration of intention to build a community of practice which helps GLAMs share their collections with the world In the last five years, the OpenGLAM community has become more global, adopted more tactics and strategies for integrating openness into institutions. But do the principles reflect this change? To find out, we’re inviting people to fill in a survey about the utility of the principles. We want to understand from the broader community: Are you aware of the principles? Are they still relevant or useful? Do you use them in your institutional or local practice? What opportunities are there to improve them for the future? The survey will run until 16th November. Your participation is greatly appreciated! To get involved with the Open GLAM working group, you can join us through openglam@okfn.org 

Are you working in the OpenGLAM arena? Tweet about it!

- July 19, 2018 in open culture, Open GLAM, OpenGLAM

Starting today, community members from Open Knowledge International, Wikimedia Foundation, and Creative Commons, will be facilitating a rotating curation of the @openglam twitter account to highlight and reflect on the impact of  “OpenGLAM” (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums) in their respective contexts. OpenGLAM is a global network of people and organizations who are working to open up content and data held by Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums. As a community of practice, it incorporates ongoing efforts to disseminate knowledge and culture through policies and practices that encourage broad communities of participation, and integrates them with the needs and activities of professional communities working at GLAM institutions. GLAMs are powerful institutions for sharing knowledge with the world. Especially on the internet, building a practice of sharing knowledge requires adopting practices that open collections using open licensing, tools, and infrastructures. To do this work, leaders around the world have to converse, run projects, and support institutions in thinking about the larger potential of sharing their knowledge with the world. We want to use the OpenGLAM Twitter account to highlight the great work that people from different regions, linguistic communities, time zones and contexts are doing to advance openness in GLAMs. Our approach is simple: contributors will be added to the @openglam account through Tweetdeck and will get a chance to curate the conversation coming from that Twitter account for 2 weeks. You can read the instructions for participants here. If you want to contribute, please sign up on this Google form! Our first curator is going to be @samuelguebo, a Wikimedia community member who has been leading partnerships with libraries in Côte d’Ivoire  and will be attending Wikimania 2018 in Cape Town, South Africa this week. Do you have an upcoming event or activity that you think will spark a conversation? Contact us to become the next curator! Curating the @openglam account is part of a broader conversation that organizations like OKI, WMF and CC are having about growing the impact of the “big open”. We hope that this curated Twitter will open up conversations about what brings us together as practitioners and enthusiasts for Open GLAM. There has been massive change in the cultural heritage sector and open communities in the past few years – the Open GLAM community is brought together by a set of principles that may need to evolve to meet these changing contexts. We hope to hear from you soon! If you want to get involved with the GLAM at Creative Commons and beyond, please consider joining the Creative Commons Slack group.

Remix public domain artworks: join the GIF IT UP 2017 competition

- October 11, 2017 in open culture, Open GLAM, OpenGLAM, public domain review

This blogpost has been adapted from the press release by Europeana. Open Knowledge International has for many years advocated for the importance of open cultural data, which enables citizens from across the world to enjoy this material, understand their cultural heritage and re-use this material to produce new works of art. Some examples of this work include the OpenGLAM initiative that promotes free and open access to digital cultural heritage held by Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums, and The Public Domain Review, an online journal and not-for-profit project dedicated to promoting and celebrating the public domain in all its abundance and variety. Another great initiative encouraging the reuse of openly licensed cultural data is the GIF IT UP competition, which is open for contributions this month. From 1-31 October, all GIF­makers, history nuts, cultural heritage enthusiasts and lovers of the internet are invited to take part in the fourth annual GIF IT UP competition. The competition encourages people to create new, fun and unique artworks from digitized cultural heritage material. A GIF is an image, video or text that has been digitally manipulated to become animated. Throughout the month, they can create and submit their own, using copyright-free digital video, images or text from Europeana CollectionsDigital Public Library of America (DPLA)Trove, or DigitalNZ. All entries help promote public domain and openly licensed collections to a wider audience, and increase the reuse of material from these four international digital libraries, including Europeana Collections. The contest is supported by GIPHY, the world’s largest library of animated GIFs. The 2017 competition will have a special focus on first-time GIF-makers and introduce them to openly licensed content. A GIF-making workshop, providing tools and tutorials to help visitors create their first artworks, will be held on 14-15 October in cooperation with THE ARTS+, the creative business festival at the Frankfurt Book Fair. One of this year’s contributions, via GIPHY The jury, made up of representatives from GIPHY, DailyArt and Public Domain Review, will be awarding one grand prize winner with an Electric Object – a digital photo frame especially for GIFs – sponsored by GIPHY. Prizes of online gift cards will go to three runners-up as well as winners in a first-time GIF-makers category. Special prizes will be allocated in thematic categories: transport, holidays, animals and Christmas cards. People are also invited to take part in the People’s Choice Award and vote on the competition website for their favourite GIF, which will receive a Giphoscope. All eligible entries will be showcased on the GIPHY channel dedicated to the competition, and promoted on social media with the hashtag #GIFITUP2017. GIF IT UP started in 2014 as an initiative by the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and DigitalNZ, and has since become a cultural highlight. 368 entries from 33 countries are featured on the GIF IT UP Tumblr. In 2016, the grand prize was awarded to ‘The State Caterpillar’, created by Kristen Carter and Jeff Gill from Los Angeles, California, using source material from the National Library of France via Europeana. Nono Burling, who got awarded the 2016 People’s Choice Award for ‘Butterflies’, said: “I adore animated GIFs made from historic materials and have for many years. The first contest in 2014 inspired me to make them myself, and every year I try to improve my skills.” Results of the 2017 competition will be announced in November on the GIF IT UP website and related social media.

Avoimet kulttuuriaineistot hyötykäyttöön Hack4FI-kulttuurihackathonissa!

- May 5, 2017 in avoin glam, cultural heritage, Events, Featured, GLAM, Hack4FI, OpenGLAM, projects

Julkaisuvapaa 5.5.2017 Avoimiin kulttuuriperintöaineistoihin keskittyvä Hack4FI – Hack your heritage -hackathon järjestetään Yleisradion Studiotalossa Helsingissä 5.–7.5.2017. Ilmaiseen viikonlopputapahtumaan osallistuu noin 100 moniammatillisesta yhteistyöstä ja kulttuuriaineistojen luovasta uudelleenkäytöstä kiinnostunutta kotimaista ja kansainvälistä taiteilijaa, graafista suunnittelijaa, koodaria, palvelumuotoilijaa, käsikirjoittajaa ja humanistia. Tapahtuma järjestetään nyt kolmatta kertaa. Hack4FI pyrkii edistämään ihmisten osallisuutta kulttuuriin ja historiaan, sekä lisäämään tietoa yhteisestä digitaalisesta kulttuuriperinnöstä. Tärkeänä tavoitteena on kannustaa osallistujia ideoimaan uusia avoimille aineistoille rakentuvia konsepteja, palveluita ja teoksia. Hackathonissa työstetään suomalaisten kulttuuri- ja muistiorganisaatioiden avointa dataa ja sisältöjä, jotka on avattu kaikkien vapaaseen käytössä. Tapahtumassa on kahdeksan teemakokonaisuutta, joissa  näkymiä historiaan, taiteeseen ja yhteiseen muistiimme tarjoaa YLE, Museovirasto, Kansallismuseo, Helsingin Kaupunginmuseo, Gallen-Kallelan Museo, Mannerheim-museo ja Helsingin tietokeskus. Osallistujat voivat mm. aikamatkailla virtuaaliteknologian kautta, remiksata videoita Suomesta ja suomalaisuudesta sekä luoda monimediallisia tarinoita Mikrohistoriawikiin. Käytössä on myös arkistojen, kirjastojen ja museoiden aineistoja yhteen kokoava Finna.fi-palvelu. Finna-rajapinnan kautta kuka tahansa saa käyttöönsä yli 13 miljoonan aineiston kuvailutiedot esimerkiksi uusien verkkopalveluiden kehittämistä varten. Finna.fi-palvelussa on myös haettavissa yli 350 000 avoimesti lisensoitua suomalaista kulttuuriperintöä edustavaa kuvaa. Lisätietoja: Hack4FI – Hack Your Heritage: http://hack4.fi/ Sanna Marttila, projektipäällikkö, sanna.marttila@okf.fi, p. 040 144 2103. AvoinGLAM järjestää Hack4FI – Hack your heritage -hackathonin yhteistyössä Yleisradion kanssa. AvoinGLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives & Museums) on osa kansainvälistä OpenGLAM-verkostoa, joka koostuu avoimien sisältöjen ja tiedon kanssa työskentelevistä toimijoista. Verkoston tavoitteena on tehdä yhteistyötä GLAM-organisaatioiden kanssa sekä avata kulttuuri- ja muistiorganisaatioiden sisältöjä ja dataa eri yleisöille. AvoinGLAM järjestää mm. työpajoja ja seminaareja, sekä jakaa tietoa ja kokemuksia avoimesta kulttuurista. Lisätietoja: avoinglam.fi AvoinGLAM on osa Open Knowledge Finland ry:tä. OKFI on vuonna 2012 perustettu yhteisölähtöinen voittoa tavoittelematon organisaatio, joka toimii osana kansainvälistä Open Knowledge -verkostoa. Yhdistys edistää tiedon avoimuutta, avoimen tiedon hyödyntämistä, sekä avoimen yhteiskunnan kehittymistä sen eri sektoreilla. Lisätietoja: http://www.okf.fi. The post Avoimet kulttuuriaineistot hyötykäyttöön Hack4FI-kulttuurihackathonissa! appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Hack4Heritage – Kreativt event och kulturarvshack sprunget ur nordiskt samarbete

- October 7, 2016 in Digisam, hack4heritage, kulturarv, OpenGLAM, pressmeddelande, Stockholms Stadsarkiv

hack4heritage Den 14-16 oktober förvandlas Stockholms stadsarkiv till en plats där kulturarvet får nytt liv i form av nya kopplingar, lösningar eller kreationer. Hack4Heritage är ett kreativt event och hack där deltagarna tillsammans utforskar hur öppen digital kulturarvsinformation kan komma till användning på nya sätt. Under fredagkvällen och hela helgen den 14-16 oktober samlas programmerare, designers, kulturarvsproffs, slöjdare, studenter och fler kompetenser för att skapa med öppna kulturarvsdata och öppet kulturarvsinnehåll från både nationella och internationella kulturarvsorganisationer. Syftet med Hack4Heritage är att öppna upp kulturarvet och skapa en plattform för fortsatt kreativ användning av den rika skatt som kulturarvet är. Tack vare kulturarvsorganisationernas goda insatser och bidrag i form av data och innehåll är detta möjligt. Hack4Heritage är ett av fyra nationella hack – ett finskt, ett danskt, ett svenskt och ett norskt – som hålls under året genom ett nordiskt samarbete kring öppna kulturarvsdata, med stöd av Nordic innovation. Därmed kommer också öppna kulturarvsresurser från andra nordiska länder att kopplas till eventet. Ett särskilt pris för lösningar som på olika sätt har nordiska kopplingar kommer att delas ut i regi av Nordic Innovation och bland annat innebära innovationsstöd och medverkan under Europas ledande start-up event Slush. Under Hack4Heritage laborerar vi med gränserna för vad ett kulturarvshack kan vara och arbetar aktivt med kreativa processer för att åstadkomma flera typer av användning av kulturarvet. Slöjd Stockholm kommer att vara på plats och bidra med olika slags material och kvalificerad kunskap kring olika tekniker och skapandeprocessen. Det gör det möjligt för deltagare att bland annat arbeta med händerna för att få idéer kring digitala lösningar eller att skapa kreationer som bygger på digitalt material. Hack4Heritage arrangeras av Digisam, Samordningssekretariatet för digitalisering av kulturarvet, i samarbete med Stockholms stadsarkiv. Sista anmälningsdag till Hack4Heritage är den 7 oktober enligt principen först till kvarn. Att delta är kostnadsfritt men observera avanmälningsavgift för sen avanmälan. Läs mer på www.hack4heritage.se Se pressmeddelandet och ladda ned loggan här: http://www.hack4heritage.se/sv/hack4heritage-kreativt-event-och-kulturarvshack-sprunget-ur-nordiskt-samarbete/ Open Knowledge Sverige är samarbetspartners till Hack4Heritage.

Hack4Heritage – Kreativt event och kulturarvshack sprunget ur nordiskt samarbete

- October 7, 2016 in Digisam, hack4heritage, kulturarv, OpenGLAM, pressmeddelande, Stockholms Stadsarkiv

hack4heritage

Den 14-16 oktober förvandlas Stockholms stadsarkiv till en plats där kulturarvet får nytt liv i form av nya kopplingar, lösningar eller kreationer. Hack4Heritage är ett kreativt event och hack där deltagarna tillsammans utforskar hur öppen digital kulturarvsinformation kan komma till användning på nya sätt.

Under fredagkvällen och hela helgen den 14-16 oktober samlas programmerare, designers, kulturarvsproffs, slöjdare, studenter och fler kompetenser för att skapa med öppna kulturarvsdata och öppet kulturarvsinnehåll från både nationella och internationella kulturarvsorganisationer. Syftet med Hack4Heritage är att öppna upp kulturarvet och skapa en plattform för fortsatt kreativ användning av den rika skatt som kulturarvet är. Tack vare kulturarvsorganisationernas goda insatser och bidrag i form av data och innehåll är detta möjligt.

Hack4Heritage är ett av fyra nationella hack – ett finskt, ett danskt, ett svenskt och ett norskt – som hålls under året genom ett nordiskt samarbete kring öppna kulturarvsdata, med stöd av Nordic innovation. Därmed kommer också öppna kulturarvsresurser från andra nordiska länder att kopplas till eventet. Ett särskilt pris för lösningar som på olika sätt har nordiska kopplingar kommer att delas ut i regi av Nordic Innovation och bland annat innebära innovationsstöd och medverkan under Europas ledande start-up event Slush.

Under Hack4Heritage laborerar vi med gränserna för vad ett kulturarvshack kan vara och arbetar aktivt med kreativa processer för att åstadkomma flera typer av användning av kulturarvet. Slöjd Stockholm kommer att vara på plats och bidra med olika slags material och kvalificerad kunskap kring olika tekniker och skapandeprocessen. Det gör det möjligt för deltagare att bland annat arbeta med händerna för att få idéer kring digitala lösningar eller att skapa kreationer som bygger på digitalt material.

Hack4Heritage arrangeras av Digisam, Samordningssekretariatet för digitalisering av kulturarvet, i samarbete med Stockholms stadsarkiv.

Sista anmälningsdag till Hack4Heritage är den 7 oktober enligt principen först till kvarn. Att delta är kostnadsfritt men observera avanmälningsavgift för sen avanmälan. Läs mer på www.hack4heritage.se

Se pressmeddelandet och ladda ned loggan här: http://www.hack4heritage.se/sv/hack4heritage-kreativt-event-och-kulturarvshack-sprunget-ur-nordiskt-samarbete/

Open Knowledge Sverige är samarbetspartners till Hack4Heritage.

Loslassen, bitte! – Warum Archive ihre Daten nicht für sich behalten sollten

- April 24, 2016 in event, OpenGLAM, Workshop

Bildschirmfoto 2016-04-24 um 14.36.55

OPENGLAM-AT. Gemeint sind damit alle Bestrebungen, die Bestände von Kulturinstitutionen durch Digitalisierungsprojekte für eine breite Öffntlichkeit im Netz frei zugänglich machen und zur freien Nutzung und Weiterverwendung zur Verfügung stellen. Mag.a Sylvia Petrovic-Majer und Dr. Thomas Aigner (ICARUS) kooperieren zu einer gemeinsamen Veranstaltung am 2. Mai im Oö- Landesarchiv, um konkrete nächste Schritte in Österreich zu setzen.

„Wir erwarten und einen Tag mit vielfältigen Dialogmöglichkeiten über Institutsgrenzen hinweg. Konkurrenzdenken und die häufige Überforderung einzelner durch die neuen Technologien wollen wir in gezielten Workshops in produktive Kooperationen umwandeln. Wenn Kultur- und Wissensinstitutionen adäquat mit Digitalisierung umgehen wollen, bedeutet das sehr viel Umstellung für die – dieser Tag soll all jene, die noch Schwellenängste haben, ermutigen, die Herausforderung gemeinsam anzupacken.“ (Sylvia Petrovic-Majer)

Wissen ist offen, wenn jede Person darauf frei zugreifen, es nutzen, verändern und teilen kann – eingeschränkt höchstens durch die Pflicht der Namensnennung oder Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen.” (Open Definition)

OpenGLAM | Freedom for information

Von der Macht offener Daten im Kulturbereich

Zeit: Montag, 2. Mai 2016, 10:00-17:00 Uhr

Ort: Oberösterreichisches Landesarchiv, Anzengruberstraße 19, 4020 Linz

Hier Anmelden !

Loslassen, bitte! – Warum Archive ihre Daten nicht für sich behalten sollten

- April 24, 2016 in event, OpenGLAM, Workshop

Bildschirmfoto 2016-04-24 um 14.36.55

OPENGLAM-AT. Gemeint sind damit alle Bestrebungen, die Bestände von Kulturinstitutionen durch Digitalisierungsprojekte für eine breite Öffntlichkeit im Netz frei zugänglich machen und zur freien Nutzung und Weiterverwendung zur Verfügung stellen. Mag.a Sylvia Petrovic-Majer und Dr. Thomas Aigner (ICARUS) kooperieren zu einer gemeinsamen Veranstaltung am 2. Mai im Oö- Landesarchiv, um konkrete nächste Schritte in Österreich zu setzen.

„Wir erwarten und einen Tag mit vielfältigen Dialogmöglichkeiten über Institutsgrenzen hinweg. Konkurrenzdenken und die häufige Überforderung einzelner durch die neuen Technologien wollen wir in gezielten Workshops in produktive Kooperationen umwandeln. Wenn Kultur- und Wissensinstitutionen adäquat mit Digitalisierung umgehen wollen, bedeutet das sehr viel Umstellung für die – dieser Tag soll all jene, die noch Schwellenängste haben, ermutigen, die Herausforderung gemeinsam anzupacken.“ (Sylvia Petrovic-Majer)

Wissen ist offen, wenn jede Person darauf frei zugreifen, es nutzen, verändern und teilen kann – eingeschränkt höchstens durch die Pflicht der Namensnennung oder Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen.” (Open Definition)

OpenGLAM | Freedom for information

Von der Macht offener Daten im Kulturbereich

Zeit: Montag, 2. Mai 2016, 10:00-17:00 Uhr

Ort: Oberösterreichisches Landesarchiv, Anzengruberstraße 19, 4020 Linz

Hier Anmelden !