You are browsing the archive for OpenSpending.

What is the difference between budget, spending and procurement data?

Danny Lämmerhirt - May 18, 2017 in Global Open Data Index, godi, OpenSpending

Fiscal data is a complex topic. It comes in all different kind of formats and languages, its’ availability cannot be taken for granted and complexity around fiscal data needs special skills and knowledge to unlock and fully understand it. The Global Open Data Index (GODI) assesses three fiscal areas of national government: budgets, spending, and procurement. Repeatedly our team receives questions why some countries rank low in budgets, public procurement or spending, even though fiscal data is openly communicated. The quick answer: often we find information that is related to this data but does not exactly describe it in accordance with the described GODI data requirements. It appears to us that a clarification is needed between different fiscal data. This blogpost is dedicated to shed light on some of these questions. As part of our public dialogue phase, we also want to address our experts in the community. How should we continue to measure the status of these three key datasets in the future? Your input counts! Should we set the bar lower for GODI and avoid measuring transactional spending data at all? Is our assessment of transactional spending useful for you? You can leave us your feedback or join the discussion on this topic in our forum.

The different types of fiscal data

A government budget year produces different fiscal data types. Budgeting is the process where a government body sets its priorities as to how it intends to spend an amount of money over a specific time period (usually annually or semi-annually). Throughout the budgeting cycle  (the process of defining the budget), an initial budget can undergo revisions to result in a revised budget. Spending is the process of giving away money. This mean, the money might be given as a subsidy, a contract, refundable tax credit, pension or salary. Procurement is the process of selecting services from a supplier who fits best the need. That might involve selecting vendors, establishing payment terms, some strategic tender or other vetting mechanism meant to prevent corruption. Not only are the processes linked to each other, the data describing these processes can be linked too (e.g. in cases where identifiers exist linking spending to government budgets and public contracts). For laypersons, it might be difficult to tell the difference when they are confronted with a spending or procurement dataset: Is the money I see in a dataset spending, or part of contracting? The following paragraphs explain the differences.

Budget

As mentioned above, budgeting is called the process where a government body decides how to spend money over a certain time period. The amount is broken into smaller amounts (budget items) which can be classified as follows:
  • Administrative (which government sub-unit gets the money)
  • Functional (what the money is going to be used for)
  • Economic (how the money is going to be used, e.g., procurement, subsidies, salaries etc.)
  • Financing source (where the money should come from).
After the budget period ends, we know how much money was actually spent on each item – in theory. The Global Open Data Index assesses budget information at the highest administrative level (e.g. national government, federal government), which is broken down in one of these classifications. Here is an example of some fully open budget data of Argentina’s national government.

Example of Argentina’s national government budget 2017 (table shortened and cleaned)

The image shows the government entity, and expenditures split into economic classification (how the money is used). At the far right, we can see a column describing the total amount of money effectively spent on a planned budget expenditure. It basically compares allocated and paid money. This column must not be mixed with spending information on a transactional level (which displays each single transaction from a government unit to a recipient).

Spending

The Spending Data Handbook describes spending as “data relating to the specific expenditure of funds from the government”. Money might be given as a subsidy, as payment for a provided service, a salary (although salaries will seldom be published on a transactional level), a pension fund payment, a contract or a loan, to name just a few.
GODI focusses on transactions of service payments (often resulting from a prior procurement process). Monetary transactions are our baseline for spending data. GODI assesses the following information:
  • The amount that was transferred
  • The recipient (an entity external to the government unit)
  • When the transaction took place
  • Government office paying the transaction
  • Data split into individual transactions
GODI exclusively looks for single payment transfers. The reason why we are looking at this type of data is that spending patterns can be detected, and fraud or corruption uncovered. Some of the questions one might be able to address include: Who received what amount of money? Could government get its services from a cheaper service provider? Is government contracting to a cluster of related companies (supporting cartels)? GODI’s definition of spending data, even though ambitious in scope, does not consider the entire spectrum of transactional spending data. Being produced by many agencies, spending data is scattered  across different places online. We usually pick samples of specific spending data such as government payments to external suppliers (e.g. the single payments through a procurement process). Other types of payment, such as grants, loans or subsidies are then left aside. Our assessment is also ‘generous’ because we accept spending data that is only published above a certain threshold. The British Cabinet Office, a forerunner in disclosing spending data, only publishes data above £25,000. GODI accepts this as valid, even though we are aware that spending data below this amount remains opaque. There are also many more ways to expand GODI’s definition of spending data. For instance, we could ask if each transaction can be linked to a budget item or procurement contract so that we understand the spending context better.

Example image of British Spending data (Cabinet Office spending over £25,000)

Above is an example image of Great Britain’s Cabinet Office spending. You can see the date and the amount paid by government entity. Using the supplier name, we can track how much money was paid to the supplier. However, in this data no contract ID or contract name is provided that could allow to fully understand as part of what contracts these payments have been made.

Procurement

When purchasing goods and services from an external source, government units require a certain process for choosing the supplier who fits best the need. This process is called procurement and includes planning, tendering, awarding, contracting and implementation. Goals are to enable a fair competition among service providers and to prevent corruption. Many data traces enable to shed light on each procurement stage. For example one might want to understand from which budget a service is gonna be paid, or what amount of money has been awarded (with some negotiation possible) or finally contracted to a supplier. This blogpost by the Open Contracting Partnership illustrates how each of the procurement stages can be understood through different data. GODI focuses on two essential stages, that are considered to be a good proxy to understand procurement. These however do not display all information. Tender phase
  • Tenders per government office
  • Tender name
  • Tender description
  • Tender status
Award phase
  • Awards per government office
  • Award title
  • Award description
  • Value of the award
  • Supplier’s name
Any payment resulting out of government contracts with external suppliers (sometimes only one, sometimes more) has to  be captured in government spending. For example, there might a construction contractor that is being paid by milestone, or an office supplies dealer which is chosen as a supplier. Then each spending transaction is for a specific item purchased through a procurement process. Below you can see a procurement database of Thailand. It displays procurement phases, but does not display individual transactions following from these. This particular database does not represent actual spending data (monetary transactions), but preceding stages of the contracting process. Despite this the platform is misleadingly called “Thailand Government Spending”.

Procurement database in Thailand

Another example is a procurement database indicating how much money has been spent on a contract:

Example for the procurement website ‘Cuánto y a quién se contrató’ (Colombia)

The road ahead – how to measure spending data in the future

Overall, there is slow but steady progress around the openness of fiscal data. Increasingly, budget and procurement data is provided in machine-readable formats or openly licensed, sometimes presented on interactive government portals or as raw data (more detail see for example in the most recent blogpost of the Open Contracting Partnership around open procurement data). Yet, there is a long way to go for transactional spending data. Governments do first laudable steps by creating budget or procurement websites which demonstrate how much money will or has been spent in total. These may be confusingly named ‘spending’ portals because in fact they are linked to other government processes such as budgeting (e.g. how much money should be spent) or procurement (how much money has been decided to pay for an external service). The actual spending in form of single monetary transactions is missing. And to date there is no coherent standard or specification that would facilitate to document transactional spending. We want to address our experts in the community. How should we continue to measure the status of these three key datasets in the future? Your input counts!  You can leave us your feedback and discuss this topic in our forum.   This blog was jointly written by Danny Lämmerhirt and Diana Krebs (Project Manager for Fiscal Projects at Open Knowledge International)

New site SubsidyStories.eu shows where nearly 300bn of EU subsidies go across Europe

Diana Krebs - March 9, 2017 in Money flows, News, Open Spending, OpenSpending

Open Knowledge Germany and Open Knowledge International launched SubsidyStories.eu: a database containing all recipients of EU Structural Funds, accounting for 292,9 Billion Euros of EU Subsidies.

The European Union allocates 44 % of its total 7-year budget through the European Structural Funds. Who received these funds – accounting for 347 Billion Euro from 2007 – 2013 and 477 Billion Euro from 2014 – 2020 – could only be traced through regional and local websites. Subsidystories.eu changes this by integrating all regional datasets into one database with all recipients of the European Structural and Investment Funds from 2007 onwards.

“SubsidyStories is a major leap forward in bringing transparency to the spending of EU funds,” said Dr Ronny Patz, a researcher focused on budgeting in the European Union and in the United Nations system at the Ludwig-Maximilans-Universität (LMU) in Munich. “For years, advocates have asked the EU Commission and EU member state governments to create a single website for all EU Structural and Investment Funds, but where they have failed, civil society now steps in.”

Subsidystories.eu makes the recipients of the largest EU subsidies program visible across Europe. Recent and future debates on EU spending will benefit from the factual basis offered by the project, as spending on the member state, regional and local level can be traced. Subsidystories.eu makes it possible to check which projects and organisations are receiving money and how it is spent across Europe. For example, the amounts given per project are vastly different per country; in Poland, the average sum per project is 381 664  € whereas in Italy this is only 63 539 €.

The data can be compared throughout the EU enabling a thorough analysis of EU spending patterns. Subsidystories.eu gives scientists, journalists and interested citizens the direct possibility of visualising data and running data analytics using SQL. The data can be directly downloaded to CSV for the entire European Union or for specific countries.

Beneficiary data, which was previously scattered across the EU in different languages and formats, had to be opened, scraped, cleaned and standardised to allow for cross-country comparisons and detailed searches. That we are now able to run detailed searches, aggregate projects per beneficiary and across countries, is a big step for financial transparency in Europe.

Subsidystories.eu is a joined cooperation between Open Knowledge Germany and Open Knowledge International, funded by Adessium and OpenBudgets.eu. 



New site SubsidyStories.eu shows where nearly 300bn of EU subsidies go across Europe

Diana Krebs - March 9, 2017 in Money flows, News, Open Spending, OpenSpending

Open Knowledge Germany and Open Knowledge International launched SubsidyStories.eu: a database containing all recipients of EU Structural Funds, accounting for 292,9 Billion Euros of EU Subsidies.

The European Union allocates 44 % of its total 7-year budget through the European Structural Funds. Who received these funds – accounting for 347 Billion Euro from 2007 – 2013 and 477 Billion Euro from 2014 – 2020 – could only be traced through regional and local websites. Subsidystories.eu changes this by integrating all regional datasets into one database with all recipients of the European Structural and Investment Funds from 2007 onwards.

“SubsidyStories is a major leap forward in bringing transparency to the spending of EU funds,” said Dr Ronny Patz, a researcher focused on budgeting in the European Union and in the United Nations system at the Ludwig-Maximilans-Universität (LMU) in Munich. “For years, advocates have asked the EU Commission and EU member state governments to create a single website for all EU Structural and Investment Funds, but where they have failed, civil society now steps in.”

Subsidystories.eu makes the recipients of the largest EU subsidies program visible across Europe. Recent and future debates on EU spending will benefit from the factual basis offered by the project, as spending on the member state, regional and local level can be traced. Subsidystories.eu makes it possible to check which projects and organisations are receiving money and how it is spent across Europe. For example, the amounts given per project are vastly different per country; in Poland, the average sum per project is 381 664  € whereas in Italy this is only 63 539 €.

The data can be compared throughout the EU enabling a thorough analysis of EU spending patterns. Subsidystories.eu gives scientists, journalists and interested citizens the direct possibility of visualising data and running data analytics using SQL. The data can be directly downloaded to CSV for the entire European Union or for specific countries.

Beneficiary data, which was previously scattered across the EU in different languages and formats, had to be opened, scraped, cleaned and standardised to allow for cross-country comparisons and detailed searches. That we are now able to run detailed searches, aggregate projects per beneficiary and across countries, is a big step for financial transparency in Europe.

Subsidystories.eu is a joined cooperation between Open Knowledge Germany and Open Knowledge International, funded by Adessium and OpenBudgets.eu. 



Open Data by default: Lorca City Council is using OpenSpending to increase transparency and promote urban mobility.

Diana Krebs - February 7, 2017 in Fiscal transparency, Open Fiscal Data, Open Spending, OpenSpending, smart city, Smart Region

Castillo de Lorca. Torre Alfonsina (Public Domain)

Lorca, a city located in the South of Spain with currently 92,000 inhabitants, launched its open data initiative on January 9th 2014. Initially it offered 23 datasets containing transport, mobility, statistical and economic information. From the very beginning, OpenSpending was the tool selected by Lorca City Council because of its capabilities and incredible visualization abilities. The first upload of datasets was done in 2013, on the previous version of OpenSpending. With the OpenSpending relaunch last year, Lorca City Council continued to make use of the OpenSpending datastore, while the TreeMap view of the expenditure budget was embedded on the council’s open data website. In December 2016, the council’s open data website was redesigned, including budget datasets built with the new version at next.openspending.org. The accounting management software of Lorca allows the automatic conversion of data files to csv. format, so these datasets are compatible with the requested formats established by OpenSpending. Towards more transparency and becoming a smart city In 2015, when the City of Lorca transparency website was launched, the council decided to continue with the same strategy focused on visualization tools to engage citizens with an intuitive approach to the budget data. Lorca is a city pioneer in the Region of Murcia in terms of open data and transparency. So far, 125 datasets have been released and much information is available along with the raw data. It deserves to be highlighted that there are pilot project initiatives to bring open data to schools, which was carried out during the past year. In 2017, we will resume to teach the culture of open data to school children with the main goal to demonstrate how to work with data by using open data. In the close future the council plans to open more data directly from the sources, i.e. achieve policy of open data by default. And of course Lorca intends to continue exploring other possibilities that Open Spending offers us to provide all this data to the citizenry. In addition, Lorca is working to become a smart city (article in Spanish only) – open data is a key element in this goal. Therefore, Lorca’s open data initiative will be a part of the Smart Social City strategy from the very beginning. 

Även gamla Ryanairkontrakt är hemliga

Erik Hjärtberg - December 20, 2015 in biljetter, datajournalistik, flygplats, flygsubventioner, OpenSpending, priser, Ryanair, Stop Secret Contracts, StopSecretContracts, subventioner, Sverige, Sweden, Västerås

Ryanairs affärsavtal med Västerås flygplats är hemliga.1 Det gäller även avtal som är 14 år gamla, visar en ny dom.2 Undertecknad begärde i somras ut Ryanairs tidigare affärsavtal med Västerås flygplats från år 2001 och 2005. Flygplatsen ville endast lämna ut handlingarna med vissa uppgifter maskade, till exempel vilka avgifter Ryanair skulle betala till flygplatsen. Undertecknad överklagade flygplatsens beslut till kammarrätten i Stockholm. I förra veckan kom domen. Kammarrätten avslår överklagandet. Västerås flygplats menar att ett offentliggörande av villkoren i Ryanairs affärsavtal med flygplatsen från 2001 och 2005 riskerar att ”röja andemeningen och inriktningen avseende nya avtalsvillkor”. Kammarrätten ”saknar anledning att betvivla riktigheten i detta”.

Noter

1. Se tidigare inlägg ”Flygplatserna har hemliga avtal med Ryanair”. 2. ”Kammarrätten i Stockholm Mål nr 6511-15”.

Kalmars flygplats subventionerade varje flygbiljett med minst 80 kronor

Erik Hjärtberg - September 22, 2015 in biljetter, datajournalistik, flygplats, flygsubventioner, okfn, OKFNSE, Open Data, Open Spending, OpenSpending, priser, Ryanair, Stop Secret Contracts, StopSecretContracts, subventioner, Sverige, Sweden

Ryanairs kontrakt med Västerås flygplats är hemliga. En uppskattning visar att skattebetalarna i kommunen subventionerar varje flygbiljett med cirka 132 kronor.1 Flygplatserna som trafikeras av Ryanair har i regel flera affärsavtal med flygbolaget rörande avgifter för att använda flygplatsen, tanka planen och så vidare. I många fall skrivs även marknadsföringsavtal med Ryanair där flygplatsen får betala för att bland annat omnämnas på Ryanairs webbsida.2 När Ryanair trafikerade Kalmars kommunägda flygplats gick lokaltidningarna ut med uppgiften att flygplatsen fick betala 80 kronor per passagerare för marknadsföring.3 Uppgiften går emellertid inte att verifiera eftersom även dessa avtal är hemliga.

Noter

1. Se tidigare inlägg ”Så mycket kostar flygbiljetten egentligen”. 2. Se till exempel: ”Påstått stöd till Västerås flygplats och Ryanair Ltd”. EU-kommissionen 3. Se: ”Bojkottar Ryanair”. Östra Småland. ”Besvikelse efter Ryanairs besked”. Barometern.

Ändrade redovisningsprinciper förvirrar

Erik Hjärtberg - August 4, 2015 in biljetter, datajournalistik, eu, flygplats, flygsubventioner, okfn, OKFNSE, Open Spending, opengov, OpenSpending, öppna data, priser, Ryanair, Stop Secret Contracts, StopSecretContracts, subventioner, Sverige, Sweden, Västerås

I föregående inlägg ställde undertecknad frågan varför aktieägartillskotten till Västerås flygplats har redovisats med olika belopp.1 Det beror på att kommunen har ändrat sina redovisningsprinciper, meddelar Lars Lundström, redovisningsekonom på Västerås flygplats. Enligt Lars Lundström har aktieägartillskotten hittills sett ut så här:
2003 38,5 Mkr 2005 8 Mkr 2006 65,5 Mkr 2008 47 Mkr 2010 35 Mkr 2015 25 Mkr

Anledningen till att beloppet 38,5 miljoner står med i årsredovisningen för 2004 är följande, meddelar Lars Lundström via e-post:
Aktieägartillskottet redovisades först som en separat post i ”Förslag till behandling av årets resultat” under ett antal år (då summerat år för år vilket kan tolkas som att det ges varje år). Sedan bytte Västerås Stad revisorer och de önskade en ändring, där tillskottet skulle redovisas som ingående i det egna kapitalet (då redovisades endast det tillskott som gavs just det redovisade året).
Detta innebär att sammanställningen över hur mycket pengar flygplatsen har kostat skattebetalarna måste korrigeras. Mellan 2001 och 2014 kostade flygplatsen därmed bara 380 miljoner räknat på aktieägartillskott, driftbidrag och fastighetsaffär.2 I år har flygplatsen tydligen fått 25 miljoner kronor i aktieägartillskott. Om årets kostnader hittills räknas in har alltså kostnaden för skattebetalarna ändå överstigit 400 miljoner kronor sedan 2001.

Noter

1. Se tidigare inlägg ”Är 38,5 miljoner felräkningspengar?”.

2. Se tidigare inlägg ”Fastighetsaffär kostade skattebetalarna 125 miljoner ”.

Är 38,5 miljoner felräkningspengar?

Erik Hjärtberg - August 3, 2015 in datajournalistik, eu, flygplats, flygsubventioner, Open Data, Open Spending, OpenSpending, öppna data, priser, Ryanair, Stop Secret Contracts, subventioner, Sverige, Sweden, Västerås

EU:s beslut om att fria Västerås flygplats från otillåtet statsstöd1 innehåller även en sammanställning över aktieägartillskott till flygplatsen under åren 2003 till 2010. Enligt EU fick flygplatsen inget aktieägartillskott alls 2004, visar tabellen nedan.2 < p class="P1">  Aktieägartillskott till VFAB enligt EU

 

EU anger flygplatsens årsredovisningar som källa. I Västerås flygplats årsredovisning för 2004 står det däremot att flygplatsen erhöll 38,5 miljoner i aktieägartillskott det året, se nedan.3

 

Ur Västerås flygplats årsredovisning för 2004.
Emellertid är det svårt att avgöra om det är EU eller flygplatsen som har skrivit fel. Västerås flygplats årsredovisning för 20054 påstår helt plötsligt att aktieägartillskottet för föregående år var 0 kronor, se nedan.

 

Ur Västerås flygplats årsredovisning för 2005.

Ingen förklaring till de vitt skilda beloppen går att hitta i årsredovisningarna. Revisorerna har inte heller haft några anmärkningar varken för 2004 eller 2005. Undertecknad har därför e-postat till stadsledningskontoret och bett om en förklaring. Tips och kommentarer är som alltid välkomna.

Noter

1. Mer om utredningen går att läsa i ett tidigare inlägg: ”Stora luckor i EU:s flygplatsbeslut”.

2. Se ”Påstått stöd till Västerås flygplats och Ryanair Ltd”. EU-kommissionen.

3. Se ”Årsredovisning för räkenskapsåret 2004-01-01 — 2004-12-31”. Västerås Flygplats AB.

4. Se ”Årsredovisning för räkenskapsåret 2005-01-01 — 2005-12-31”. Västerås Flygplats AB.

Stora luckor i EU:s flygplatsbeslut

Erik Hjärtberg - July 1, 2015 in biljetter, datajournalistik, eu, flygplats, flygsubventioner, Open Data, Open Spending, OpenSpending, priser, Ryanair, Stop Secret Contracts, StopSecretContracts, subventioner, Sverige, Sweden, Västerås

EU-kommissionen har utrett ett klagomål från flygbolaget SAS rörande påstått olagligt statligt stöd med anledning av avtalen mellan Västerås flygplats och Ryanair. Kommissionen har även undersökt om Västerås kommuns bidrag till flygplatsen under åren 2000–2010 varit att betrakta som otillåtet statsstöd.

EU har nu publicerat en offentlig version av beslutet. Emellertid har vissa upplysningar i beslutet utelämnats. Utelämnade upplysningar anges med […] i handlingen.1 Som tabellen nedan visar gör den utelämnade informationen att det är omöjligt för en utomstående att undersöka rimligheten i EU:s beslut. Grafik: EU-kommissionen
Eftersom beslutet används i den politiska debatten om flygplatsen och Ryanair2 finns det ändå en poäng med att berätta vad som faktiskt har beslutats. Utredningen handlar om kommunens stöd till flygplatsen mellan år 2001 och 2010 samt flygplatsens kontrakt med Ryanair under samma tidsperiod. EU:s beslut innebär inte nödvändigtvis att kommunen även i framtiden har rätt att subventionera flygplatsen. EU:s beslut innebär inte heller nödvändigtvis att flygplatsens nuvarande avtal med Ryanair är lönsamt.
 

Om kommunens stöd till flygplatsen

Så här skriver EU-kommissionen om Västerås kommuns aktieägartillskott till flygplatsen:

Kommissionen finner att Sverige olagligen genomfört aktieägartillskottet till VFAB under 2003–2010 i strid med artikel 108.3 i fördraget om Europeiska unionens funktionssätt. Kommissionen anser dock att detta statliga stöd är förenligt med den inre marknaden i enlighet med artikel 107.3 c i EUF-fördraget.

Sverige är i EU:s handlingar samlingsnamnet för alla svenska myndigheter. EU menar att aktieägartillskottet ”snedvrider eller hotar att snedvrida konkurrensen” och är att definiera som statligt stöd. Det olagliga som Västerås kommun har gjort är att inte själv anmäla aktieägartillskottet till EU-kommissionen för en bedömning.3 EU-kommissionen anser vidare att aktieägartillskottet ska definieras som driftstöd enligt EU:s regler för bidrag till flygplatser.4 Kommissionen godkänner driftstöd till flygplatser under en övergångsperiod på tio år från den 4 april 2014. Olagligt driftsstöd som beviljats före övergångsperiodens början är enligt reglerna förenligt med EU:s inre marknad. Därmed är det inte alls säkert att Västerås kommun även i framtiden kommer att kunna subventionera flygplatsen som gjorts tidigare.  

Om flygplatsens avtal med Ryanair

Så här skriver EU-kommissionen om Västerås flygplats avtal med Ryanair:

Kommissionen finner att de kommersiella överenskommelserna mellan VFAB, å ena sidan, och Ryanair och AMS, å andra sidan (åtgärderna 4 och 5) inte utgör statligt stöd.

VFAB är förstås Västerås flygplats. AMS är Ryanairs dotterbolag Airport Marketing Services. EU:s definition av statligt stöd är bidrag och liknande som snedvrider konkurrensen. EU anser att de avtal som flygplatsen tecknade med Ryanair under den granskade perioden kunde förväntas öka flygplatsens lönsamhet. Mellan åren 2001 och 2004 ska det i efterhand ha konstaterats att Ryanair också ökade flygplatsens lönsamhet. Kommissionen noterar även att ”flygplatsdriften” vid Västerås flygplats var lönsam under hela den period som omfattas av beslutet. Det ska förtydligas att flygplatsen hela tiden har gått med förlust. EU menar troligen att intäkterna från passagerartrafiken på flygplatsen varit större än kostnaderna för passagerartrafiken mellan år 2001 och 2010. Tabell 6, ovan, visar att det under dessa år fanns fler flygbolag än Ryanair på Västerås flygplats. Det  är i det sammanhanget som Ryanair under några år ansågs öka flygplatsens lönsamhet och ”flygplatsdriften” sågs som lönsam. I skrivande stund har Ryanair all reguljär trafik på flygplatsen.5 Därmed är det inte alls säkert att Ryanairs nuvarande avtal med flygplatsen är lönsamt. Tips och kommentarer är som alltid välkomna.  

Noter

1. Europeiska Kommissionen. ”Påstått stöd till Västerås flygplats och Ryanair Ltd”.

2. Se till exempel: Bergström, Britt-Louise, ”Revisorer efterlyser bättre direktiv”. Vestmanlands Läns Tidning.

3. ”Fördraget om Europeiska Unionens funktionssätt (konsoliderad version)”. Europeiska unionens officiella tidning.

4. ”Riktlinjer för statligt stöd till flygplatser och flygbolag”. Europeiska unionens officiella tidning.

5. Enligt Wikipedia räknas även Almedalsflyget, som flyger mellan Västerås och Visby under fem dagar, till reguljärt flyg.

Crowdsourcing av Allmänna Handlingar genom projektet “Fråga Staten” av Open Knowledge Sweden!

Jonathan Milläng - June 4, 2015 in crowdsourcing, Fråga Staten, FrågaStaten, FROIDE, open-government, opengov, OpenSpending

Hur öppet är Sverige egentligen? Den svenska offentlighetsprincipen är den äldsta informationsfrihetslagen i världen. Lagen är en grundbult i svensk demokrati och spelar en ovärderlig roll i vår förmåga att granska staten och möjliggör positiv samhällsutveckling som exempel av medborgardialog. Men hur har utvecklingen skett med denna funktion som demokratiskt fundament i ett digitalt informationssamhälle? Open Knowledge Sweden är en ideell organisation som verkar för ökad tillgång till öppen information. Genom att sjösätta en plattform som gör det lättare för individer och organisationer att begära ut allmänna handlingar, vill Open Knowledge Sweden utveckla och underlätta användandet av offentlighetsprincipen även i ett digitalt samhälle. “Tillsammans med experter från näringsliv, forskning och samhälle har VINNOVA gjort bedömningen att FrågaStaten kan bidra tillatt visa värdet av öppna data. – VINNOVA, April 2015 Stockholm, Sverige, 4 Juni 2015 — Målet med Fråga Staten är att frigöra det sociala och ekonomiska värdet som tillkommer från den öppna tillgången av allmänna handlingar. Open Knowledge Sweden vill speciellt belysa hur öppen information i ett nordiskt sammanhang leder till positiv och hållbar samhällsutveckling. Ett av målen är också att uppmärksamma offentlighetsprincipens fundamentala roll i vår demokrati. Genom en överskådlig plattform byggd på mjukvaran FROIDE kommer Fråga Staten göra det lätt och bekvämt för medborgare att använda offentlighetsprincipen. Plattformen kommer tillåta användare att begära ut och ta del av allmänna handlingar genom en digitaliserad och automatiserad samlingsplats. Samtidigt kommer den minska arbetsbelastningen för offentlig sektor. Den sökbara databasen med utgivna allmänna handlingar leder till minskade förfrågningar av samma dokument och möjliggör istället för tjänstemän att behandla andra ärenden. Det enda manuella arbetet som projektet kräver är sekretessprövning innan handlingen publiceras på webben. Liknande tjänster baserade på FROIDE har framgångsrikt lanserats i bland annat Tyskland och Österrike. Förväntade resultat är hundratals till tusentals begärda offentliga handlingar av medborgare, samt ett underlättat och därmed ökat användande av allmänna handlingar för privat och professionellt bruk, t.ex. journalistiskt arbete. I samband med utvecklingen och lanseringen av plattformen välkomnar Open Knowledge Sweden varmt intresse från journalister, tjänstemän i offentlig sektor och medborgare att medskapa för att göra den så bra som möjligt! För ytterligare information och mediala tillfrågningar, vänligen kontakta: Jonathan Milläng jonathan[at]okfn.se