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Iconology of a Cardinal: Was Wolsey Really so Large?

Adam Green - May 3, 2018 in Art & Illustrations, cardinal wolsey, Culture & History, eating in tudor times, hans holbein, henry viii, iconography, Painting, power, thomas wolsey, tudor, weight

Characterised as manipulative, power-hungry, and even an alter rex, Henry VIII's right-hand man Cardinal Thomas Wolsey has been typically depicted with a body mass to rival his political weight. Katherine Harvey asks whether he was really the glutton of popular legend, and what such an image reveals about the link between the body, reputation, and power in Tudor England.

Lover of the Strange, Sympathizer of the Rude, Barbarianologist of the Farthest Peripheries

Adam Green - July 5, 2017 in art, biography, chinese art, chinese art in the west, occidentalism, Painting, Pan Youxun, western art in china

CONJECTURES #5 — Winnie Wong brings us a short biography of the Chinese curioso Pan Youxun (1745-1780). At issue? Hubris, hegemony, and global art history.

Lover of the Strange, Sympathizer of the Rude, Barbarianologist of the Farthest Peripheries

Adam Green - July 5, 2017 in art, biography, chinese art, chinese art in the west, occidentalism, Painting, Pan Youxun, western art in china

CONJECTURES #5 — Winnie Wong brings us a short biography of the Chinese curioso Pan Youxun (1745-1780). At issue? Hubris, hegemony, and global art history.

Lover of the Strange, Sympathizer of the Rude, Barbarianologist of the Farthest Peripheries

Adam Green - July 5, 2017 in art, biography, chinese art, chinese art in the west, occidentalism, Painting, Pan Youxun, western art in china

CONJECTURES #5 — Winnie Wong brings us a short biography of the Chinese curioso Pan Youxun (1745-1780). At issue? Hubris, hegemony, and global art history.

Gustav Wunderwald’s Paintings of Weimar Berlin

Adam Green - May 31, 2017 in 1920s, Art & Illustrations, Berlin, Featured Articles, flâneur, gustav wunderwald, industrialisation, industry, interwar, neue sachlichkeit, new objectivity, Painting, roaring twenties, walter benjamin, working class

The Berlin of the 1920s is often associated with a certain image of excess and decadence, but it was a quite different side of the city — the sobriety and desolation of its industrial and working-class districts — which came to obsess the painter Gustav Wunderwald. Mark Hobbs explores.

Painted Photograph of an Unknown Man (ca. 1855–70)

Adam Green - October 11, 2016 in early photography, Painting, painting over photographs, Photography

An unusual example of a painted photograph, in which the artist has left sections untouched by paint.

Painted Photograph of an Unknown Man (ca. 1855–70)

Adam Green - October 11, 2016 in early photography, Painting, painting over photographs, Photography

An unusual example of a painted photograph, in which the artist has left sections untouched by paint.

Painted Photograph of an Unknown Man (ca. 1855–70)

Adam Green - October 11, 2016 in early photography, Painting, painting over photographs, Photography

An unusual example of a painted photograph, in which the artist has left sections untouched by paint.

Painted Photograph of an Unknown Man (ca. 1855–70)

Adam Green - October 11, 2016 in early photography, Painting, painting over photographs, Photography

An unusual example of a painted photograph, in which the artist has left sections untouched by paint.

Painted Photograph of an Unknown Man (ca. 1855–70)

Adam Green - October 11, 2016 in early photography, Painting, painting over photographs, Photography

An unusual example of a painted photograph, in which the artist has left sections untouched by paint.