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OpenTrialsFDA presents prototype as finalist for the Open Science Prize

- December 1, 2016 in #openscience, News, Open Science, Open Trials, opentrials, Press

For immediate release Open Knowledge International is thrilled to announce that the OpenTrialsFDA team is presenting its prototype today at the BD2K Open Data Science Symposium in Washington, DC as finalist for the Open Science Prize. The Open Science Prize is a global science competition to make both the outputs from science and the research process broadly accessible. From now until 6 January 2017, the public is asked to help select the most promising, innovative and impactful prototype from among the six finalists – of which one will receive the grand prize of $230,000. OpenTrialsFDA is a collaboration between Dr. Erick Turner (a psychiatrist-researcher and transparency advocate), Dr. Ben Goldacre (Senior Clinical Research Fellow in the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Oxford) and the team behind OpenTrials at Open Knowledge International.   OpenTrialsFDA works on making clinical trial data from the FDA (the US Food and Drug Administration) more easily accessible and searchable. Until now, this information has been hidden in the user-unfriendly Drug Approval Packages that the FDA publishes via its dataportal Drugs@FDA. These are often just images of pages, so you cannot even search for a text phrase in them. OpenTrialsFDA scrapes all the relevant data and documents from the FDA documents, runs Optical Character Recognition across all documents, links this information to other clinical trial data, and now presents it through a new user-friendly web interface at fda.opentrials.net. otfda_prototype_search
Explore the OpenTrialsFDA search interface
Any user can type in a drug name, and see all the places where this drug is mentioned in an FDA document. Users can also access, search and present this information through the application programming interfaces (APIs) the team will produce. In addition, the information has been integrated into the OpenTrials database, so that the FDA reports are linked to reports from other sources, such as ClinicalTrials.gov, EU CTR, HRA, WHO ICTRP, and PubMed. The prototype will provide the academic research world with important information on clinical trials in general, improving the quality of research, and helping evidence-based treatment decisions to be properly informed. Interestingly, the FDA data is unbiased, compared to reports of clinical trials in academic journals. Dr. Erick Turner explains: “With journal articles everything takes place after a study has finished, but with FDA reviews, there is a protocol that is submitted to the FDA before the study has even started. So the FDA learns first of all that the study is to be done, which means it can’t be hidden later. Secondly it learns all the little details, methodological details about how the study is going to be done and how it is going to be analyzed, and that guards against outcome switching.”
Dr Ben Goldacre: “These FDA documents are hugely valuable, but at the moment they’re hardly ever used. That’s because – although they’re publicly accessible in the most literal sense of that phrase – they are almost impossible to search, and navigate. We are working to make this data accessible, so that it has the impact it deserves.”

Voting for the Open Science Prize finalists is possible through  http://event.capconcorp.com/wp/osp: more information on OpenTrialsFDA is available from fda.opentrials.net/about and from the team’s video below.   Editor’s notes Dr. Ben Goldacre
Ben is a doctor, academic, writer, and broadcaster, and currently a Senior Clinical Research Fellow in the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Oxford. His blog is at www.badscience.net and he is @bengoldacre on twitter. Read more here. His academic and policy work is in epidemiology and evidence based medicine, where he works on various problems including variation in care, better uses of routinely collected electronic health data, access to clinical trial data, efficient trial design, and retracted papers. In policy work, he co-authored this influential Cabinet Office paper, advocating for randomised trials in government, and setting out mechanisms to drive this forwards. He is the co-founder of the AllTrials campaign. He engages with policy makers. Alongside this he also works in public engagement, writing and broadcasting for a general audience on problems in evidence based medicine. His books have sold over 600,000 copies.
Dr. Erick Turner
Dr. Erick Turner is a psychiatrist-researcher and transparency advocate. Following a clinical research fellowship at the NIH, he worked for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), acting as gatekeeper for new psychotropic drugs seeking to enter the US market. In 2004 he published a paper drawing researchers’ attention to the Drugs@FDA website as a valuable but underutilized source of unbiased clinical trial data. Dissatisfied with the continuing underutilization of Drugs@FDA, he published a paper in the BMJ in order to encourage wider use of this trove of clinical trial data.
Open Knowledge International
https://okfn.org   
Open Knowledge International is a global non-profit organisation focussing on realising open data’s value to society by helping civil society groups access and use data to take action on social problems. Open Knowledge International addresses this in three steps: 1) we show the value of open data for the work of civil society organizations; 2) we provide organisations with the tools and skills to effectively use open data; and 3) we make government information systems responsive to civil society.
Open Science Prize
https://www.openscienceprize.org/res/p/finalists/
The Open Science Prize  is a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health and the Wellcome Trust, with additional funding provided by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute of Chevy Chase, Maryland.  The Open Data Science Symposium will feature discussions with the leaders in big data, open science, and biomedical research while also showcasing the finalists of the Open Data Science Prize, a worldwide competition to harness the innovative power of open data.

OpenTrialsFDA presents prototype as finalist for the Open Science Prize

- December 1, 2016 in #openscience, News, Open Science, Open Trials, opentrials, Press

For immediate release Open Knowledge International is thrilled to announce that the OpenTrialsFDA team is presenting its prototype today at the BD2K Open Data Science Symposium in Washington, DC as finalist for the Open Science Prize. The Open Science Prize is a global science competition to make both the outputs from science and the research process broadly accessible. From now until 6 January 2017, the public is asked to help select the most promising, innovative and impactful prototype from among the six finalists – of which one will receive the grand prize of $230,000. OpenTrialsFDA is a collaboration between Dr. Erick Turner (a psychiatrist-researcher and transparency advocate), Dr. Ben Goldacre (Senior Clinical Research Fellow in the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Oxford) and the team behind OpenTrials at Open Knowledge International.   OpenTrialsFDA works on making clinical trial data from the FDA (the US Food and Drug Administration) more easily accessible and searchable. Until now, this information has been hidden in the user-unfriendly Drug Approval Packages that the FDA publishes via its dataportal Drugs@FDA. These are often just images of pages, so you cannot even search for a text phrase in them. OpenTrialsFDA scrapes all the relevant data and documents from the FDA documents, runs Optical Character Recognition across all documents, links this information to other clinical trial data, and now presents it through a new user-friendly web interface at fda.opentrials.net. otfda_prototype_search
Explore the OpenTrialsFDA search interface
Any user can type in a drug name, and see all the places where this drug is mentioned in an FDA document. Users can also access, search and present this information through the application programming interfaces (APIs) the team will produce. In addition, the information has been integrated into the OpenTrials database, so that the FDA reports are linked to reports from other sources, such as ClinicalTrials.gov, EU CTR, HRA, WHO ICTRP, and PubMed. The prototype will provide the academic research world with important information on clinical trials in general, improving the quality of research, and helping evidence-based treatment decisions to be properly informed. Interestingly, the FDA data is unbiased, compared to reports of clinical trials in academic journals. Dr. Erick Turner explains: “With journal articles everything takes place after a study has finished, but with FDA reviews, there is a protocol that is submitted to the FDA before the study has even started. So the FDA learns first of all that the study is to be done, which means it can’t be hidden later. Secondly it learns all the little details, methodological details about how the study is going to be done and how it is going to be analyzed, and that guards against outcome switching.”
Dr Ben Goldacre: “These FDA documents are hugely valuable, but at the moment they’re hardly ever used. That’s because – although they’re publicly accessible in the most literal sense of that phrase – they are almost impossible to search, and navigate. We are working to make this data accessible, so that it has the impact it deserves.”

Voting for the Open Science Prize finalists is possible through  http://event.capconcorp.com/wp/osp: more information on OpenTrialsFDA is available from fda.opentrials.net/about and from the team’s video below.   Editor’s notes Dr. Ben Goldacre
Ben is a doctor, academic, writer, and broadcaster, and currently a Senior Clinical Research Fellow in the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Oxford. His blog is at www.badscience.net and he is @bengoldacre on twitter. Read more here. His academic and policy work is in epidemiology and evidence based medicine, where he works on various problems including variation in care, better uses of routinely collected electronic health data, access to clinical trial data, efficient trial design, and retracted papers. In policy work, he co-authored this influential Cabinet Office paper, advocating for randomised trials in government, and setting out mechanisms to drive this forwards. He is the co-founder of the AllTrials campaign. He engages with policy makers. Alongside this he also works in public engagement, writing and broadcasting for a general audience on problems in evidence based medicine. His books have sold over 600,000 copies.
Dr. Erick Turner
Dr. Erick Turner is a psychiatrist-researcher and transparency advocate. Following a clinical research fellowship at the NIH, he worked for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), acting as gatekeeper for new psychotropic drugs seeking to enter the US market. In 2004 he published a paper drawing researchers’ attention to the Drugs@FDA website as a valuable but underutilized source of unbiased clinical trial data. Dissatisfied with the continuing underutilization of Drugs@FDA, he published a paper in the BMJ in order to encourage wider use of this trove of clinical trial data.
Open Knowledge International
https://okfn.org   
Open Knowledge International is a global non-profit organisation focussing on realising open data’s value to society by helping civil society groups access and use data to take action on social problems. Open Knowledge International addresses this in three steps: 1) we show the value of open data for the work of civil society organizations; 2) we provide organisations with the tools and skills to effectively use open data; and 3) we make government information systems responsive to civil society.
Open Science Prize
https://www.openscienceprize.org/res/p/finalists/
The Open Science Prize  is a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health and the Wellcome Trust, with additional funding provided by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute of Chevy Chase, Maryland.  The Open Data Science Symposium will feature discussions with the leaders in big data, open science, and biomedical research while also showcasing the finalists of the Open Data Science Prize, a worldwide competition to harness the innovative power of open data.

OpenTrials launches beta version today at the World Health Summit

- October 10, 2016 in Featured, News, Press

For immediate release Open Knowledge International is delighted to announce the launch of the public preview beta version ofOpenTrials at a panel session on ‘Fostering Open Science in Global Health’ at the World Health Summit today, 10 October 2016, the world’s foremost forum for strategic questions of Global Health.  OpenTrials is an open, online database of information about the world’s clinical trials funded by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation through the Center for Open Science. The project, which is designed to increase transparency and improve access to research, is directed by Dr. Ben Goldacre, an internationally known leader on clinical transparency, and is being built by Open Knowledge International. OpenTrials works like a search engine, with advanced search options for filtering results by criteria such as drug and disease area. All data and documents for each trial included are “threaded” together and presented alongside each other. At the World Health Summit, the team will be demonstrating how the OpenTrials interface works, including how to explore trials and filter results by criteria such as drug and disease area.  They will also demonstrate the power of linking clinical trial information together, showing how it can be used to highlight important discrepancies in the data.

opentrials-database-768x336Explore the database at  opentrials.net

We want the information provided on OpenTrials to inform decision-making and lead to better medical services worldwide. We expect a range of potential uses for the platform:
  • A public health researcher could find out more about the range of trials on a drug, searching by various criteria to match a specific population.
  • A doctor interested in critical appraisal of research papers could see if sources of bias for specific trials have already been assessed by experts.
  • A researcher could see if the same trial reports somewhat different methods or results in different places.
  • A patient interested in participating in a trial for their condition could identify trials in their geographical area which are enrolling.
A crowdsourcing functionality allows users to contribute data and documents and to provide feedback on the accuracy of trial information. OpenTrials currently extracts and displays data from ClinicalTrials.gov, EU CTR, HRA, WHO ICTRP, and PubMed, and risk of bias assessments from the Cochrane Schizophrenia group. After the beta launch, we plan to integrate systematic review data from Epistemonikos and other sources. There are seven additional sources of data that have been extracted, but can’t currently be displayed because of licensing issues – we are working with these sources of data to get permission to publish. We’ll keep updating the OpenTrials blog as they become available.

“This project aims to draw together everything that is known around each clinical trial. The end product will provide valuable information for patients, doctors, researchers, and policymakers…” – Dr. Ben Goldacre

“There have been numerous positive statements about the need for greater transparency on information about clinical trials, over many years, but it has been almost impossible to track and audit exactly what is missing, or easily identify discrepancies in information about trials” explained Dr. Goldacre, the project’s Chief Investigator and a Senior Clinical Research Fellow in the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Oxford. “This project aims to draw together everything that is known around each clinical trial. The end product will provide valuable information for patients, doctors, researchers, and policymakers—not just on individual trials, but also on how whole sectors, researchers, companies, and funders are performing. It has the potential to show who is failing to share information appropriately, who is doing well, and how standards can be improved.” “OpenTrials is an important step towards ensuring researchers, journalists, and patient groups have access to the medical information they need,” said Pavel Richter, CEO of Open Knowledge International. “Through the OpenTrials platform, researchers can advance science more quickly, doctors can easily find the latest evidence to improve services, and patients can locate information about pressing public health issues. OpenTrials is a great example of the work we are doing at Open Knowledge International to equip civil society organisations with the tools and information they need to address social problems and improve people’s lives.”

“OpenTrials is an important step towards ensuring researchers, journalists, and patient groups have access to the medical information they need.” – Pavel Richter, CEO of Open Knowledge International

The first phase of the Open Trials project is scheduled for completion in March 2017. For project updates, please follow @opentrials on twitter or get in touch with us at opentrials@okfn.org.  A Hack Day (a World Health Summit Satellite event) took place on 8 October in Berlin. For more details, see here:https://opentrials.net/hackday Further information on speakers and topics of the World Health Summit 2016: www.worldhealthsummit.org/the-summit/program www.worldhealthsummit.org/the-summit/speakers The World Health Summit is open to media representatives: www.worldhealthsummit.org/press-media/accreditation
Editor’s notes: Ben Goldacre Ben is a doctor, academic, writer, and broadcaster, and currently a Senior Clinical Research Fellow in the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Oxford. His blog is at www.badscience.net and he is @bengoldacre on twitter. Read more here. His academic and policy work is in epidemiology and evidence based medicine, where he works on various problems including variation in care, better uses of routinely collected electronic health data, access to clinical trial data, efficient trial design, and retracted papers. In policy work, he co-authored this influential Cabinet Office paper, advocating for randomised trials in government, and setting out mechanisms to drive this forwards. He is the co-founder of the AllTrials campaign. He engages with policy makers. Alongside this he also works in public engagement, writing and broadcasting for a general audience on problems in evidence based medicine. His books have sold over 600,000 copies. Open Knowledge International https://okfn.org https://opentrials.net Open Knowledge International is a global non-profit organisation focussing on realising open data’s value to society by helping civil society groups access and use data to take action on social problems. Open Knowledge International addresses this in three steps: 1) we show the value of open data for the work of civil society organizations; 2) we provide organisations with the tools and skills to effectively use open data; and 3) we make government information systems responsive to civil society. The Laura and John Arnold Foundation www.arnoldfoundation.org LJAF is a private foundation committed to producing substantial, widespread, and lasting reforms that will maximize opportunities and minimize injustice in our society. Its strategic investments are currently focused on criminal justice, education, public accountability, evidence-based policy, and research integrity. LJAF has offices in Houston, New York City and Washington D.C. COS http://centerforopenscience.org COS is a non-profit technology company providing free, open source software and services to increase inclusivity and transparency of research. COS supports shifting incentives and practices to align more closely with scientific values.  COS develops the Open Science Framework as an infrastructure to enable a more open and transparent research workflow across all of the sciences. World Health Summit www.worldhealthsummit.org Under the high patronage of German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President François Hollande and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, the WHS attracts about 1,800 participants from more than 80 countries. It is the premiere international platform for  exploring strategic developments and decisions in the area of healthcare.

Open Knowledge appoints Pavel Richter as new CEO

- April 29, 2015 in Featured, News, Open Knowledge, Open Knowledge Foundation, Press

I am delighted to announce we have found the newest member of the Open Knowledge team: Pavel Richter joins us as our new CEO! Pavel Richter Pavel’s appointment marks a new chapter in the development of Open Knowledge, which, over the last ten years, has grown into one of the leading global organisations working on open data and open knowledge in government, research, and culture. Pavel has a rich and varied background including extensive time both in business and in the non-profit sector. In particular, Pavel brings his experience from over five years as the Executive Director of Wikimedia Deutschland: under his leadership, it grew to more than 70 staff, an annual budget of nearly 5 million Euros, and initiated major new projects such as Wikidata. Pavel’s engagement follows an extensive international search, led by a team including members of the Board of Directors as well as a Community Representative. Personally, I am delighted and excited to welcome Pavel as CEO. This appointment represents an important step in the development of Open Knowledge as an organisation and community. Over the last decade, and especially in the last five years, we have achieved an immense amount. Going forward one of our most important opportunities – and challenges – will be to forge and catalyse a truly global movement to put openness at the heart of the information age. Pavel’s experience, insight and passion make him more than equal to this task and I am thrilled to be able to work with him, and support him, as he takes on this role.

Belgium scores slightly higher on the Global Open Data Index, big expectations for 2015

- December 9, 2014 in belgium, opendataindex, Press, ranking

According to the Global Open Data Index, Belgium ranks 53d out of 97 countries, going up from 27% to 39%. A status quo one might think, knowing that last year Belgium ranked 58th, but a lot has happened since. The Global Data Index, a tool developed by Open Knowledge, ranks 97 nations based on 10 key national datasets. The UK sits at the top with 96% opened up data on government spending, budget, postal codes and more. Belgium however remains in the middle of the list between Croatia and Costa Rica. Yet a lot has changed: KBO/BCE opened up their company register database as open data [1] earlier this year and Irceline launched the pollutant emissions website [2] opening up data on air quality. Detailed results can be found at http://index.okfn.org/place/belgium/. “If nothing happened regarding opening up Belgian data, we would have dropped to the 83rd place. Opening up data is a global phenomenon, it is not happening only in the Western countries”, says Pieter-Jan Pauwels, community coordinator at Open Knowledge Belgium. Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 15.38.12 That is something the new federal government realised, especially when neighbouring countries take on the 1st (UK), 3rd (France), 9th (Germany) and 16th place (Netherlands). In the new federal policy agreement, open data was mentioned several times and where once nobody was directly responsible we now have a minister responsible for the Digital Agenda. Minister Alexander De Croo announced last week at the Opening Up conference that this number is too low and will be higher next year. Together with organisations such as Leiedal and Open Knowledge Belgium, he signed the “Open by default” charter, where Belgium now promises to open up datasets if there are no good reasons not to. Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 15.36.26 The 23d of February Open Knowledge Belgium vzw/asbl will organise the Open Belgium conference in Namur with minister De Croo as one of the keynote speakers. During the conference we will discuss open data on different levels in Belgium as well as host hands-on sessions on e.g., open science, open tourism, open transport or open street map. The full programme is available at http://2015.openbelgium.be.

Open Knowledge Foundation and BBC sign Memorandum of Understanding

- November 27, 2013 in Press

On Monday of this week, the Open Knowledge Foundation signed a memorandum of understanding with the BBC. The BBC also signed separate memorandums with the Europeana Foundation, the Open Data Institute and the Mozilla Foundation. Laura James, CEO of the Open Knowledge Foundation, signs the MoU with James Purnell, BBC Director of Strategy and Digital. The signing is an important step in cementing the relationship between the Open Knowledge Foundation and one of the world’s largest broadcasting organisations. It also marks a new commitment on the part of the BBC to embrace open data and open standards. James Purnell, Director of Strategy and Digital at the BBC, said that this memorandum signalled that the BBC was “here for audience’s interests and not just the BBC’s” and that through it the BBC plans to find “find new ways to engage audiences”. The signing ceremony was a formal recognition of the work the five organisations had done together and paved the way for future collaborations, some of which are already in the pipeline. In January 2014, for instance, the Open Knowledge Foundation, alongside the BBC and the Wikimedia community, will be coordinating the first ever “speakerthon”. Using the BBC’s vast radio archive, participants will tag and select snippets of notable individuals’ voices in order to upload them to Wikipedia articles as open content. Developers at the BBC are keen to use the crowdsourced data to tag other parts of the archive and automatically identify where else a given individual is speaking. This initiative is a great demonstration of the kind of benefit open data and open content can have for an organisation like the BBC. It allows them to simultaneously use their rich digital archive to improve existing open resources like Wikipedia, whilst developing new and innovative ways to harness the power of their audiences to improve their own digital assets (in this case through crowdsourced voice identification). Collaborations like the “speakerthon”, which enable audiences to be contributors as well as consumers of broadcast media, can be a cause for concern for cultural institutions, especially those like the BBC which were born in the heyday of industrial one-way broadcasting. I commend the BBC for taking these first steps to re-configuring the traditional relationship it has with its audiences in allowing them a more participatory role. That is not to say that the idea of open is somehow alien to the BBC, quite the opposite. The BBC has a long history of supporting technological innovation and using the benefits it bring to improve access to information. Indeed, in its Charter the BBC sets two of its central purposes: “to sustain citizenship and civil society” and “to help to deliver to the public the benefit of emerging communications technologies”. In signing the memorandum of understanding on Monday, the BBC is affirming that it sees open data, open content and open standards as the key to connecting these two principles that are so deeply entrenched in its DNA. As Bill Thompson, Head of Partnership Development at the BBC archive, said on Monday the memorandum marks only the first step in a long conversation between the five organisations. The challenge is to turn these words into actions and concrete collaborations that will unlock the potential of the BBC’s vast archive of culturally and historically-significant material. What kind of collaborations between the BBC and the Open Knowledge Foundation would you like to see? What do you think are the possibilities for audience participation and technological innovation using open data at the BBC? Send us your ideas in the comments. PRESS RELEASE: BBC signs Memorandum of Understanding with the Open Knowledge Foundation

新的普查在倫敦峰會前夕揭露 – 政府資料仍然不夠開放

- October 28, 2013 in okfn, Press

原文:https://blog.okfn.org/2013/10/28/government-data-still-not-open-enough/ 在本週即將在倫敦舉辦的國際政府透明化會議之前,開放知識基金會發佈了2013年的開放資料指標,顯示各政府在提供給公民和企業等方便取得的資訊,腳步仍然緩慢。 在所調查的70個國家,英國和美國分別在普查的前兩名,後續是丹麥、挪威和荷蘭。在所有調查的國家中,賽浦勒斯、聖克里斯多福、英屬維京群島、肯亞和布吉納法索等,則是敬陪末座。另外有相當數量的國家,在資料開放的態度上顯得更為保守,但因為缺乏在地的公民社會關注,因此沒有列入本調查。這些國家包含了在開放政府夥伴關係 (Open Government Partnership) 名單內的三十個國家。 本普查的項目主要分為十個領域,以資料是否存在和方便取得為主要的評鑑指標,這包含了政府支出、選舉結果、交通運輸時刻表、環境污染指數等,雖然在部分項目各國皆有不錯的表現,但然後有相當的部份需要更確切的落實。 開放知識基金會的執行長和創辦人 Rufus Pollock 表示:
政府資料的開放將可以推動民主、責信以及創新。這能讓公民了解和實行他們的權利,從運輸到教育和醫療健康,也為整個社會帶來好處。雖然在過去幾年,不少政府在資料開放的態度上有著相當的善意,但是本普查卻明顯的揭露了高價值的資料仍然無法取得。

雖然英國和美國在開放政府資料上引領風潮,但仍有多處需要更為加強,例如:美國並不提供單一的工商登記資料源,或是英國選舉委員會因為對於選舉資料的態度,而造成英國表現的下降。 在工商登記資料庫,有著更多令人沮喪的結果:在普查排名前二十的國家當中,只有五個提供了真正符合開放授權的的資料,而也只有十個國家提供了大量下載的機制。本類型的資訊很重要,尤其是在逃稅、其他型態的經濟犯罪和貪腐的制衡上。 在排行前二十個國家,所有的評比資料集,只有不到半數能夠被稱為是開放資料,這顯示了即使是先進國家,也仍然無法完全理解公民和企業在資料本體的合法運用、技術需求、再製以及重新散佈的重要性,因為這能讓所有人建立和分享屬於商業或非商業的服務。 Pollock 又表示:
為了讓開放資料的效益能夠舉體實現,政府必須不只是把試算表上傳到網站而已。開放的資料必須要容易取得和了解,並且免費提供,無論目的為何,允許所有人在所有地方,重新再製和分享。
/ Ends CONTACT: Open Knowledge Foundation on +44 (0)1223 422159 or index@okfn.org. To see the full results: index.okfn.org. For graphs of the data: index.okfn.org/visualisations. NOTES FOR EDITORS The Open Data Index is a community-based effort initiated and coordinated by the Open Knowledge Foundation. The Index is compiled using contributions from civil society members and open data practitioners around the world, which are then peer-reviewed and checked by expert open data editors. The Index provides an independent assessment of openness in the following areas: transport timetables; government budget; government spending; election results; company registers; national map; national statistics; legislation; postcodes / ZIP codes; emissions of pollutants. Countries assessed (in rank order): United Kingdom, United States, Denmark, Norway, Netherlands, Australia, Finland, Sweden, New Zealand, Canada, Iceland, Moldova, Bulgaria, Malta, Italy, France, Austria, Portugal, Slovenia, Switzerland, Israel, Czech Republic, Spain, Ireland, Greece, Croatia, Isle Of Man, Japan, Serbia, Russian Federation, Ecuador, South Korea, Poland, Taiwan R.O.C., China, Indonesia, Hungary, Brazil, Germany, Mexico, Jersey, Guernsey, Slovak Republic, Bermuda, Romania, Costa Rica, Bangladesh, Tunisia, Singapore, Lithuania, South Africa, Cayman Islands, Egypt, Nepal, Senegal, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, Gibraltar, Belgium, Hong Kong, Barbados, Bahamas, India, Bahrain, Yemen, Burkina Faso, Kenya, British Virgin Is., Saint Kitts & Nevis, Cyprus. NB: a number of countries were not assessed, often because they were not open enough to have an active civil society able or free to safely carry out the research. Open Data is information which can be freely used, reused and shared by anyone, anywhere, for any purpose. Truly open data demands a range of both technical and legal qualities which ensure that anyone can reuse it freely, for maximum benefit, and the Open Data Index assesses all of these. The Open Definition sets out the principles which define “openness” in relation to data and content: opendefinition.org The Open Knowledge Foundation is an international non-profit working to open up information around the world so it can be used to empower citizens and organizations to build fair and sustainable societies. See: okfn.org The annual summit for the Open Government Partnership will take place in London on 31st October to 1st November. More details at: opengovpartnership.org

日內瓦首度舉辦「開放」的聯合國

- September 3, 2013 in Featured, okfn, Press

公告日期:2013 年 9 月 2 日
即時公告(英文德文法文 瑞士日內瓦是國際外交組織聚集的重鎮,9 月 16 至 18 日將舉辦一個前所未見的國際盛會:開放知識論壇 Open Knowledge Conference ,聚集聯合國組織與各界公共行政部門,包括科技行動者,公民企業,資訊導向設計人員。在這個聚會中,黑客、創客與外交官握手言談,救援工作者也可依資訊分析結果具體地解決問題! 過去幾年來,世界各國的政府與類同的國際組織力行資料公開化,無論是十四行詩的統計數據,或是基因與地理等資料,開放資料 OpenData 很快地成為各界對透明,問責與創新的一個卓越的驅動力。今日,這些創新的成果無論在科技或社會上都持續地發展,“開放 Open” 的概念一同 “綠環保 Green”,都是永續科技政策與前瞻性決策的基石。 世界各地超過 600 名的資料應用者,研究員與決策者將在日內瓦聚首,寫下這個全球開放運動的一個里程碑。參與者包括來自聯合國兒童基金會 UNICEF, 聯合國培訓與研究基金會 UNITAR,聯合國教科文組織 UNESCO,聯合國開發計劃署 UNDP,歐洲核子研究組織 CERN,世界銀行 World Bank,除此之外,更多全球關係內的組織團體形成的網路替“開
放時代 Open Age”定下註腳。 主講人包括愛倫 米勒 Ellen Miller,陽光基金會執行長 、克李斯 范 Chris Vein,世界銀行創新長、克李斯 塔格特 Chris Taggart,開放公司執行長、捷 耐度 Jay Naidoo,全球營養改善聯盟主席。除了高層次的全體參與項目,另有軟體研發的黑客空間與工作坊,主題包括資料新聞學,開放金融財政,開放運輸交通資料,公民資料的文化能力等,許多高互動與實作生產的交流機會,以連結全球開放運動的主要參與者們 。我們的目標:打開世界的知識,善用它,也讓它變成有用的。 節錄 愛倫 貝爾瑟特 Alain Berset,瑞士聯邦政府議員與民政部部長:歡迎這個全球運動來到瑞士,這個發展項目開啓了資訊社會公民無法想像的可能。我們今天站在這個發展的起點,對於我們的社會,其重要性很難被高估。讓我們抓緊這個機會,肩並著肩一起工作,例如瑞士聯邦政府的開放資訊入口網站,這個先導計畫將在這次的論壇中啓動。 魯夫士 波拉克 Rufus Pollock,開放知識基金會的創立人,加註: “我們很高興有這麼多國家支持開放資料,無論是 G8 或是開放政府合作關係 Open Government Partnership ,具體的屢行開放資料。國際組織的領導者們在日內瓦開放知識論壇中能夠凝聚開放知識的共識,並向各界活動者、企業家、研究人員與救援工作者證明其努力的實質效應。2013 開放知識論壇是一個小型的“開放聯合國”,呼籲聯合國 UN 拿起領導的角色,打開這個世界的資訊,落實真正的透明與問責。 漢斯 佳瑟爾 Hannes GassertOpendata.ch 的共同創辦人,此次論壇的主持人: 這個活動將會是瑞士開放資料的一個里程碑。我們確信這是一個開始,將能提升資訊導向的透明度,資訊分析與視覺化,有助於促進公部門的開放與創新,振興我們所珍惜的直接民主。 聯繫 相關疑問和訪談邀約請連繫: press@okcon.org.
其它圖像與認證見 http://okcon.org/press
進一步建議請聯繫:Hannes Gassert (簡介如上),+41786631109 /
media@opendata.ch. 備註 OKCon 2013 開放知識論壇將於瑞士日內瓦 CICI 會議中心舉辦,日期為 2013 年 9 月16 至 18 日,由瑞士開放知識基金會 (Opendata.ch) 和開放知識基金會主辦,瑞士聯邦政府協辦。此次活動將匯集全球各界公部門,私人團體及社群的專家與改造者。完整的時程表見 http://okcon.org/schedule 開放知識基金會 Open Knowledge Foundation 致力於全球性的行動,打開世界的知識,善用它,也讓它變成有用的,賦予公民新的知識與洞見,實現公平並永續的社會。基金會推動並提倡自由地再使用資料與開放內容的活動,包括公共資訊,公共補助的研究與公共領域的文化內容。見 http://okfn.org Opendata.ch,開放知識基金會之瑞士版,這次開放知識論壇的主辦團體。自 2011 年起,瑞士開放知識基金會影響了公共政策,建立在地社群,探索直接民主與開放資料之間的關係。成功的活動系列有 make.opendata.ch – 黑日子 hackdays,有效的串聯設計者,研發人員與決策者間的合作。 瑞士聯邦資訊入口網站,將於這次論壇活動 2013 年 9 月 16 日啓動,網址 opendata.admin.ch。這是由瑞士聯邦紀錄檔案室與各計畫夥伴共同創立的先導計畫入口網站,開放瑞士官方各階層的資訊,提供多樣性的紀錄檔案與資訊,包括瑞士國土,人口統計數字,最新天氣數據,歷史文獻,更或者是,瑞士文學目錄。任何人皆可自由再製。見 http://www.bar.admin.ch/themen/01648?lang=en 。 開放的定義為“開放”其相關資料與內容,確保它可以被自由使用,再利用和再分配,確保與其他公開資料的相互操作為原則。開放資訊的素材必須能夠被自由使用,讓任何人,於任一地點方,應用在任何用途。為了確保這一點,公開的定義要求開放資訊與內容是能夠被公開取得的,以一個合適的格式,並有適當的開放定義。見 http://opendefinition.org 相關資訊見 http://okfn.org/press-releases/geneva-to-host-the-united-nations-of-open/
*本文譯者:Pei(playaround.cc 電子藝術與數位環境工作坊策動人)

Announcing Recline.JS: a Javascript library for building data applications in the browser

- July 5, 2012 in Featured, LOD2, OKF, Open Textbooks, Press, Sprint / Hackday, texts

Today we’re pleased to announce the first public release of Recline.JS, a simple but powerful open-source library for building data applications in pure Javascript. For those of you who want to get hands on right away, you can: recline-map-geo-filter-sf-crime

What Is It?

Recline is a Javascript library of data components incuding grid, graphing and data connectors. The aim of Recline is to weave together existing open-source components to create an easy to use but powerful platform for building your own data apps. The views can be embedded in to other apps just like we’ve done for CKAN and the DataHub where it’s used for our data viewer and visualisations. What makes Recline so versatile is its modularity, meaning you only need to take what you need for the data app you want to build. Main features:
  • View (and edit) your data in a clean grid / table interface
  • Built in visualizations including graphs, maps and timelines
  • Load data from multiple sources including online CSV and Excel, local CSV, Google Docs, ElasticSearch and the DataHub
  • Bulk update/clean your data using an easy scripting UI
  • Easily extensible with new Backends so you can connect to your database or storage layer
  • Open-source, pure javascript and designed for integration — so it is easy to embed in other sites and applications
  • Built on the simple but powerful Backbone giving a clean and robust design which is easy to extend
  • Properly designed model with clean separation of data and presentation
  • Componentized design means you use only what you need

Who’s Behind It?

Recline has been developed by Rufus Pollock and Max Ogden with substantial contributions from the CKAN team including Adria Mercader and Aron Carroll.

Demos

There are a selection of demos now available on the Recline website for you to try out.

Multiview Demo

reclinejs-demo-multiview-20120705

The Data Explorer

recline-us-unemployment-20120607

Timeliner

recline-timeliner-20120703