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QA of Open Data Handbook Nepali Version

- August 26, 2016 in Data Handbook, Data Nepal, Fundraising, nepal, Open Data, project

Handbook Introduction The Open Data Handbook (first issued in 2010 and regularly updated) is a guide to open data, specifically open government data. It was first issued in 2010 by Open Knowledge International and has been regularly updated since. The handbook has been used by governments and civil society organizations around the world as an introduction and blue-print for open data projects. The Nepali version of this handbook (which is currently seeking funders) will include content from Global Open Data Handbook, including Licensing terms from Open Definition and Open Data Policy guidelines / principles terms from Sunlight Foundation guidelines.   Need of the handbook in Nepal Open data is steadily gaining momentum in Nepal, led by Civil Society and a handful of government agencies. But progress has been slow. One of the reasons for this slow uptake is the confusion because many people do not know about the meaning and benefits of Open data due to the lack of proper guidance and resources.  In recent years, we have witnessed considerable enthusiasm over the opportunities offered by open data. Across many sectors, it is widely believed that we are entering a new era of information openness and transparency. This evolution has the potential to spur economic innovation, social transformation, and fresh forms of political and government accountability. Yet, despite the evident potential of open data and the growing amounts of information being released by governments and corporations, little is actually known about its use and impact in Nepal. The condition of knowledge around open data in Nepal is inadequate because Nepal lacks resources in its native language concerning ideas around open data. A Nepali Version Handbook will work as a perfect resource for government and civil society organizations (CSOs) to expand their understandings of open data and, ultimately, reap its benefits. We are translating and developing this Open Data Handbook in Nepali with the belief that it will help Government policymakers, leaders, and citizens understand open data in their native language. It will also be a useful resource for CSOs to use for their own open data awareness programs, as well as data journalists who rely on data openness to report on local stories.   How could it benefit the Government of Nepal? Nepal’s Government has slowly begun to understand the value of open data and citizen engagement. Praise for this awareness raising can be attributed to the national and international civil society for running a continuously vibrant open data movement in Nepal. We can see how certain government agencies have set an example by supporting open data, such as the Election Commission Nepal, Office of Company Registrar Nepal, Ministry of Finance’s Aid Management Platform, and more. However, our recent crowdsourced research in 10 different local cities of Nepal has shown that Nepal still has room to improve its policy on open data, especially at the local level. For open data initiatives and programs to be successful, they needs to start focusing on local governments rather than the central government. For local governments to adopt Open Data, they need to be clear about the whys, hows, and whats of opening up their data. They need to understand why making data open is not only a means to make them more accountable (or worse, alarmed), but it will also help them become more efficient and effective in their duties. This document will help individuals understand that opening data is only the beginning of participatory governance, and it will demonstrate the importance of well defined and easy-to-adopt mechanisms. To create a successful Open Data mechanism, local officials will need resource in their native tongue as many local peoples are unable to fully comprehend English. An Open Data guide in Nepali will also help the central government to implement Open Data related policy at the local levels.   How could it benefit local journalists? As Journalists in Nepal have been the direct beneficiaries of the Right to Information Act, a legal transparency and accountability mechanism, they are beginning to understand the additional benefits that Open Data can have on their work. Interest in data journalism is increasing in Nepal and we can see lots of examples led by a number of teams, like Datajourno Nepal, FACTS Nepal, and Graph Nepal, who are using open data and visualizations for more in-depth storytelling. Print and online newspapers have also begun to use more open data for evidence-based reporting. Still, open data is a new term for most Nepali Journalists. This is mainly true because open data is interlinked with technology and lacks learning resources in the Nepali Language. Through the Open Data Handbook in Nepali, we aim to minimize this problem by providing the answer to their questions regarding open data  in their native language. Through this handbook, we hope:
  • That journalists can learn the whats and hows of Open Data in Nepali.
  • That they can find new ways in which to innovate in the field of journalism.
  • That fact based reporting will increase.
  • Journalists will use it as a guidebook to teach others about Open Data and advocate for open data within local communities.
  Dissemination of the publication? In the first phase, we will be targeting Government Organizations, Government and Private Libraries and Educational Institutes. As one of the main supporters of the Handbook is the National Information Commission, they will be helping us to disseminate book through their networks.   What kind of impacts will the Handbook have? We envision our impact to be mainly around the four differents themes of open data: improving government, empowering citizens, creating opportunity, and solving public problems. To achieve impact within these different themes, solely having a good supply of data is not enough. We also need to ensure that the demand side is strong by increasing innovation, engagement, and reusability of published data. However, in Nepal, many people and organizations are reluctant to carry out the fully possibility of open data because they have a limited knowledge around the topic and  the concept as a whole. So, this handbook will make it easier for government officials and the citizens of Nepal to learn more about open data in their native language. In doing so, this project will help create a balanced environment between the supply and demand side of data, which in the long run will help promote and institutionalize transparency, accountability and citizen engagement in Nepal. Find out more or contribute to the Open Data Handbook in Nepali here.

QA of Open Data Handbook Nepali Version

- August 26, 2016 in Data Handbook, Data Nepal, Fundraising, nepal, Open Data, project

Handbook Introduction The Open Data Handbook (first issued in 2010 and regularly updated) is a guide to open data, specifically open government data. It was first issued in 2010 by Open Knowledge International and has been regularly updated since. The handbook has been used by governments and civil society organizations around the world as an introduction and blue-print for open data projects. The Nepali version of this handbook (which is currently seeking funders) will include content from Global Open Data Handbook, including Licensing terms from Open Definition and Open Data Policy guidelines / principles terms from Sunlight Foundation guidelines.   Need of the handbook in Nepal Open data is steadily gaining momentum in Nepal, led by Civil Society and a handful of government agencies. But progress has been slow. One of the reasons for this slow uptake is the confusion because many people do not know about the meaning and benefits of Open data due to the lack of proper guidance and resources.  In recent years, we have witnessed considerable enthusiasm over the opportunities offered by open data. Across many sectors, it is widely believed that we are entering a new era of information openness and transparency. This evolution has the potential to spur economic innovation, social transformation, and fresh forms of political and government accountability. Yet, despite the evident potential of open data and the growing amounts of information being released by governments and corporations, little is actually known about its use and impact in Nepal. The condition of knowledge around open data in Nepal is inadequate because Nepal lacks resources in its native language concerning ideas around open data. A Nepali Version Handbook will work as a perfect resource for government and civil society organizations (CSOs) to expand their understandings of open data and, ultimately, reap its benefits. We are translating and developing this Open Data Handbook in Nepali with the belief that it will help Government policymakers, leaders, and citizens understand open data in their native language. It will also be a useful resource for CSOs to use for their own open data awareness programs, as well as data journalists who rely on data openness to report on local stories.   How could it benefit the Government of Nepal? Nepal’s Government has slowly begun to understand the value of open data and citizen engagement. Praise for this awareness raising can be attributed to the national and international civil society for running a continuously vibrant open data movement in Nepal. We can see how certain government agencies have set an example by supporting open data, such as the Election Commission Nepal, Office of Company Registrar Nepal, Ministry of Finance’s Aid Management Platform, and more. However, our recent crowdsourced research in 10 different local cities of Nepal has shown that Nepal still has room to improve its policy on open data, especially at the local level. For open data initiatives and programs to be successful, they needs to start focusing on local governments rather than the central government. For local governments to adopt Open Data, they need to be clear about the whys, hows, and whats of opening up their data. They need to understand why making data open is not only a means to make them more accountable (or worse, alarmed), but it will also help them become more efficient and effective in their duties. This document will help individuals understand that opening data is only the beginning of participatory governance, and it will demonstrate the importance of well defined and easy-to-adopt mechanisms. To create a successful Open Data mechanism, local officials will need resource in their native tongue as many local peoples are unable to fully comprehend English. An Open Data guide in Nepali will also help the central government to implement Open Data related policy at the local levels.   How could it benefit local journalists? As Journalists in Nepal have been the direct beneficiaries of the Right to Information Act, a legal transparency and accountability mechanism, they are beginning to understand the additional benefits that Open Data can have on their work. Interest in data journalism is increasing in Nepal and we can see lots of examples led by a number of teams, like Datajourno Nepal, FACTS Nepal, and Graph Nepal, who are using open data and visualizations for more in-depth storytelling. Print and online newspapers have also begun to use more open data for evidence-based reporting. Still, open data is a new term for most Nepali Journalists. This is mainly true because open data is interlinked with technology and lacks learning resources in the Nepali Language. Through the Open Data Handbook in Nepali, we aim to minimize this problem by providing the answer to their questions regarding open data  in their native language. Through this handbook, we hope:
  • That journalists can learn the whats and hows of Open Data in Nepali.
  • That they can find new ways in which to innovate in the field of journalism.
  • That fact based reporting will increase.
  • Journalists will use it as a guidebook to teach others about Open Data and advocate for open data within local communities.
  Dissemination of the publication? In the first phase, we will be targeting Government Organizations, Government and Private Libraries and Educational Institutes. As one of the main supporters of the Handbook is the National Information Commission, they will be helping us to disseminate book through their networks.   What kind of impacts will the Handbook have? We envision our impact to be mainly around the four differents themes of open data: improving government, empowering citizens, creating opportunity, and solving public problems. To achieve impact within these different themes, solely having a good supply of data is not enough. We also need to ensure that the demand side is strong by increasing innovation, engagement, and reusability of published data. However, in Nepal, many people and organizations are reluctant to carry out the fully possibility of open data because they have a limited knowledge around the topic and  the concept as a whole. So, this handbook will make it easier for government officials and the citizens of Nepal to learn more about open data in their native language. In doing so, this project will help create a balanced environment between the supply and demand side of data, which in the long run will help promote and institutionalize transparency, accountability and citizen engagement in Nepal. Find out more or contribute to the Open Data Handbook in Nepali here.

QA of Open Data Handbook Nepali Version

- August 26, 2016 in Data Handbook, Data Nepal, Fundraising, nepal, Open Data, project

Handbook Introduction The Open Data Handbook (first issued in 2010 and regularly updated) is a guide to open data, specifically open government data. It was first issued in 2010 by Open Knowledge International and has been regularly updated since. The handbook has been used by governments and civil society organizations around the world as an introduction and blue-print for open data projects. The Nepali version of this handbook (which is currently seeking funders) will include content from Global Open Data Handbook, including Licensing terms from Open Definition and Open Data Policy guidelines / principles terms from Sunlight Foundation guidelines.   Need of the handbook in Nepal Open data is steadily gaining momentum in Nepal, led by Civil Society and a handful of government agencies. But progress has been slow. One of the reasons for this slow uptake is the confusion because many people do not know about the meaning and benefits of Open data due to the lack of proper guidance and resources.  In recent years, we have witnessed considerable enthusiasm over the opportunities offered by open data. Across many sectors, it is widely believed that we are entering a new era of information openness and transparency. This evolution has the potential to spur economic innovation, social transformation, and fresh forms of political and government accountability. Yet, despite the evident potential of open data and the growing amounts of information being released by governments and corporations, little is actually known about its use and impact in Nepal. The condition of knowledge around open data in Nepal is inadequate because Nepal lacks resources in its native language concerning ideas around open data. A Nepali Version Handbook will work as a perfect resource for government and civil society organizations (CSOs) to expand their understandings of open data and, ultimately, reap its benefits. We are translating and developing this Open Data Handbook in Nepali with the belief that it will help Government policymakers, leaders, and citizens understand open data in their native language. It will also be a useful resource for CSOs to use for their own open data awareness programs, as well as data journalists who rely on data openness to report on local stories.   How could it benefit the Government of Nepal? Nepal’s Government has slowly begun to understand the value of open data and citizen engagement. Praise for this awareness raising can be attributed to the national and international civil society for running a continuously vibrant open data movement in Nepal. We can see how certain government agencies have set an example by supporting open data, such as the Election Commission Nepal, Office of Company Registrar Nepal, Ministry of Finance’s Aid Management Platform, and more. However, our recent crowdsourced research in 10 different local cities of Nepal has shown that Nepal still has room to improve its policy on open data, especially at the local level. For open data initiatives and programs to be successful, they needs to start focusing on local governments rather than the central government. For local governments to adopt Open Data, they need to be clear about the whys, hows, and whats of opening up their data. They need to understand why making data open is not only a means to make them more accountable (or worse, alarmed), but it will also help them become more efficient and effective in their duties. This document will help individuals understand that opening data is only the beginning of participatory governance, and it will demonstrate the importance of well defined and easy-to-adopt mechanisms. To create a successful Open Data mechanism, local officials will need resource in their native tongue as many local peoples are unable to fully comprehend English. An Open Data guide in Nepali will also help the central government to implement Open Data related policy at the local levels.   How could it benefit local journalists? As Journalists in Nepal have been the direct beneficiaries of the Right to Information Act, a legal transparency and accountability mechanism, they are beginning to understand the additional benefits that Open Data can have on their work. Interest in data journalism is increasing in Nepal and we can see lots of examples led by a number of teams, like Datajourno Nepal, FACTS Nepal, and Graph Nepal, who are using open data and visualizations for more in-depth storytelling. Print and online newspapers have also begun to use more open data for evidence-based reporting. Still, open data is a new term for most Nepali Journalists. This is mainly true because open data is interlinked with technology and lacks learning resources in the Nepali Language. Through the Open Data Handbook in Nepali, we aim to minimize this problem by providing the answer to their questions regarding open data  in their native language. Through this handbook, we hope:
  • That journalists can learn the whats and hows of Open Data in Nepali.
  • That they can find new ways in which to innovate in the field of journalism.
  • That fact based reporting will increase.
  • Journalists will use it as a guidebook to teach others about Open Data and advocate for open data within local communities.
  Dissemination of the publication? In the first phase, we will be targeting Government Organizations, Government and Private Libraries and Educational Institutes. As one of the main supporters of the Handbook is the National Information Commission, they will be helping us to disseminate book through their networks.   What kind of impacts will the Handbook have? We envision our impact to be mainly around the four differents themes of open data: improving government, empowering citizens, creating opportunity, and solving public problems. To achieve impact within these different themes, solely having a good supply of data is not enough. We also need to ensure that the demand side is strong by increasing innovation, engagement, and reusability of published data. However, in Nepal, many people and organizations are reluctant to carry out the fully possibility of open data because they have a limited knowledge around the topic and  the concept as a whole. So, this handbook will make it easier for government officials and the citizens of Nepal to learn more about open data in their native language. In doing so, this project will help create a balanced environment between the supply and demand side of data, which in the long run will help promote and institutionalize transparency, accountability and citizen engagement in Nepal. Find out more or contribute to the Open Data Handbook in Nepali here.

QA of Open Data Handbook Nepali Version

- August 26, 2016 in Data Handbook, Data Nepal, Fundraising, nepal, Open Data, project

Handbook Introduction

The Open Data Handbook (first issued in 2010 and regularly updated) is a guide to open data, specifically open government data. It was first issued in 2010 by Open Knowledge International and has been regularly updated since. The handbook has been used by governments and civil society organizations around the world as an introduction and blue-print for open data projects.

The Nepali version of this handbook (which is currently seeking funders) will include content from Global Open Data Handbook, including Licensing terms from Open Definition and Open Data Policy guidelines / principles terms from Sunlight Foundation guidelines.

 

Need of the handbook in Nepal

Open data is steadily gaining momentum in Nepal, led by Civil Society and a handful of government agencies. But progress has been slow. One of the reasons for this slow uptake is the confusion because many people do not know about the meaning and benefits of Open data due to the lack of proper guidance and resources.  In recent years, we have witnessed considerable enthusiasm over the opportunities offered by open data. Across many sectors, it is widely believed that we are entering a new era of information openness and transparency. This evolution has the potential to spur economic innovation, social transformation, and fresh forms of political and government accountability.

Yet, despite the evident potential of open data and the growing amounts of information being released by governments and corporations, little is actually known about its use and impact in Nepal. The condition of knowledge around open data in Nepal is inadequate because Nepal lacks resources in its native language concerning ideas around open data. A Nepali Version Handbook will work as a perfect resource for government and civil society organizations (CSOs) to expand their understandings of open data and, ultimately, reap its benefits.

We are translating and developing this Open Data Handbook in Nepali with the belief that it will help Government policymakers, leaders, and citizens understand open data in their native language. It will also be a useful resource for CSOs to use for their own open data awareness programs, as well as data journalists who rely on data openness to report on local stories.

 

How could it benefit the Government of Nepal?

Nepal’s Government has slowly begun to understand the value of open data and citizen engagement. Praise for this awareness raising can be attributed to the national and international civil society for running a continuously vibrant open data movement in Nepal. We can see how certain government agencies have set an example by supporting open data, such as the Election Commission Nepal, Office of Company Registrar Nepal, Ministry of Finance’s Aid Management Platform, and more. However, our recent crowdsourced research in 10 different local cities of Nepal has shown that Nepal still has room to improve its policy on open data, especially at the local level. For open data initiatives and programs to be successful, they needs to start focusing on local governments rather than the central government.

For local governments to adopt Open Data, they need to be clear about the whys, hows, and whats of opening up their data. They need to understand why making data open is not only a means to make them more accountable (or worse, alarmed), but it will also help them become more efficient and effective in their duties. This document will help individuals understand that opening data is only the beginning of participatory governance, and it will demonstrate the importance of well defined and easy-to-adopt mechanisms. To create a successful Open Data mechanism, local officials will need resource in their native tongue as many local peoples are unable to fully comprehend English. An Open Data guide in Nepali will also help the central government to implement Open Data related policy at the local levels.

 

How could it benefit local journalists?

As Journalists in Nepal have been the direct beneficiaries of the Right to Information Act, a legal transparency and accountability mechanism, they are beginning to understand the additional benefits that Open Data can have on their work. Interest in data journalism is increasing in Nepal and we can see lots of examples led by a number of teams, like Datajourno Nepal, FACTS Nepal, and Graph Nepal, who are using open data and visualizations for more in-depth storytelling. Print and online newspapers have also begun to use more open data for evidence-based reporting.

Still, open data is a new term for most Nepali Journalists. This is mainly true because open data is interlinked with technology and lacks learning resources in the Nepali Language. Through the Open Data Handbook in Nepali, we aim to minimize this problem by providing the answer to their questions regarding open data  in their native language.

Through this handbook, we hope:

  • That journalists can learn the whats and hows of Open Data in Nepali.
  • That they can find new ways in which to innovate in the field of journalism.
  • That fact based reporting will increase.
  • Journalists will use it as a guidebook to teach others about Open Data and advocate for open data within local communities.

 

Dissemination of the publication?

In the first phase, we will be targeting Government Organizations, Government and Private Libraries and Educational Institutes. As one of the main supporters of the Handbook is the National Information Commission, they will be helping us to disseminate book through their networks.

 

What kind of impacts will the Handbook have?

We envision our impact to be mainly around the four differents themes of open data: improving government, empowering citizens, creating opportunity, and solving public problems. To achieve impact within these different themes, solely having a good supply of data is not enough. We also need to ensure that the demand side is strong by increasing innovation, engagement, and reusability of published data.

However, in Nepal, many people and organizations are reluctant to carry out the fully possibility of open data because they have a limited knowledge around the topic and  the concept as a whole. So, this handbook will make it easier for government officials and the citizens of Nepal to learn more about open data in their native language. In doing so, this project will help create a balanced environment between the supply and demand side of data, which in the long run will help promote and institutionalize transparency, accountability and citizen engagement in Nepal.

Find out more or contribute to the Open Data Handbook in Nepali here.

Fundraising for Open Data Handbook Nepali Version

- August 5, 2016 in Book, nepal, Open Data, Open Data Handbook, Open Data Nepal, project

Open Data Barometer 2015, a global annual survey that measures and ranks the availability, readiness, and impact of open (government) data of nations ranked Nepal at position 68 among 92 countries surveyed. Nepal’s overall score is 13.09, Readiness score is 22, Implementation score is 12, and Impact score is 8. The scores are relative to world leader UK’s score of 100 in all measures – readiness, implementation, and impact. The scoring and rankings are comparable in other surveys, including the Open Knowledge’s Global Open Data Index in 2014 and 2015. This gives us a clear picture of state of Open Government Data in Nepal that Nepal’s government can be more open by implementing open government plans and actions and increasing the impact of open data on overall economy of Nepal.

This is actually a decrease in Nepal’s ranking compared to Open Data Barometer 2014 by 7 places. Nepal scored similar grades in 2014 as it did in 2015. The decrease in ranking, even though the scoring is similar helps us to understand that while Nepal has made no significant progress towards an open government, other countries leapfrogged Nepal. The same scenario repeated in Nepal Open Data Index 2015, which highlights the understanding of Open Data in the local cities of Nepal is very poor.  Open Data is steadily gaining momentum in Nepal, led by Civil Society, and joined by handful of government agencies. The progress made is slow.

The reasons for slow uptake of open data practices are many. One of them is that a state of confusion is created when people do not know about the meaning and benefits of Open Data due to lack of proper guidance and resources.

We are trying to localize Open Data Handbook in Nepali. We believe this Open Data Handbook Nepali Version will help Government policy makers, leaders and common citizens to understand about Data in their Native language easily and CSO can take their awareness program in next level by using the resources.

 

Need of Open Data Handbook in Nepal

We live in the generation where people want their government to be more Transparent and Accountable than ever and want to be engaged with every kinds of government decisions and activities to increase innovation & efficiency, which will lead their country towards sustainable development. The only way for the government to increase the citizens’ engagement in government activities and to increase transparency is Open Data. “Open Data is data that can be freely used, reused and redistributed by anyone – subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and sharealike.” Open Data not only increases transparency and accountability, but also promotes greater efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of public services by allowing users to easily consume and interpret data. Recent years have witnessed considerable enthusiasm over the opportunities offered by open data. Across sectors, it is widely believed today that we are entering a new era of information openness and transparency, and that this has the potential to spur economic innovation, social transformation, and fresh forms of political and government accountability.

Yet despite the evident potential of open data, and despite the growing amounts of information being released by governments and corporations, little is actually known about its use and impact. The condition of its is more poor in Nepal because Nepal lack resources in Native language for Open Data awareness. This Nepali Version Handbook will works as an perfect resource which government and CSO can use for awareness program.

Open Data Handbook (first issued in 2010 and regularly updated) is the guide to open data, and especially open government data is the project of Open Knowledge International. It has been translated into more than 18 languages including Chinese, English, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish, and has been used by governments and civil society organisations around the world as an introduction and blue-print for open data projects.

 

Who is leading Open Data Handbook Nepali Version

Open Knowledge Nepal the working group of Open Knowledge International in Nepal is leading the project. Open Knowledge is a nonprofit based in Cambridge, United Kingdom. In Nepal, Open Knowledge Nepal works as an open network of young people who are passionate about open data, open science, open development, and openness in general. Members of Open Knowledge Nepal have been working with other governmental and non-governmental organizations in works related to open knowledge, especially open data and open government data. The family of the group contains professors, students, activists, journalists, government officers from various fields as an members and supporters. Open Data and Transparency is one of the oldest thematic areas for the group and has been engaged with it since a while. The group has been involved in research, advocacy, training, organizing meetups and hackathons, and developing tools related to Open Data, Open Access, Open Development and others. It is a non-profit open network of open knowledge enthusiasts and was founded in 2013.

 

Methodology

  1. Collecting and Finalizing resources in English language (Please find the draft here)
  2. Translating the Resources
  3. Review of Translation from Experts
  4. Designing and Finalizing Handbook
  5. Printing and Launch
  6. Free printed book distribution within Government Organization

 

The name of the Individual or Organization Funders will be written in the book explicitly. Interested organization and individual can contact project co-ordinator: nikeshbalami@gmail.com for more information.

Fundraising for Open Data Handbook Nepali Version

- August 5, 2016 in Book, nepal, Open Data, Open Data Handbook, Open Data Nepal, project

Open Data Barometer 2015, a global annual survey that measures and ranks the availability, readiness, and impact of open (government) data of nations ranked Nepal at position 68 among 92 countries surveyed. Nepal’s overall score is 13.09, Readiness score is 22, Implementation score is 12, and Impact score is 8. The scores are relative to world leader UK’s score of 100 in all measures – readiness, implementation, and impact. The scoring and rankings are comparable in other surveys, including the Open Knowledge’s Global Open Data Index in 2014 and 2015. This gives us a clear picture of state of Open Government Data in Nepal that Nepal’s government can be more open by implementing open government plans and actions and increasing the impact of open data on overall economy of Nepal. This is actually a decrease in Nepal’s ranking compared to Open Data Barometer 2014 by 7 places. Nepal scored similar grades in 2014 as it did in 2015. The decrease in ranking, even though the scoring is similar helps us to understand that while Nepal has made no significant progress towards an open government, other countries leapfrogged Nepal. The same scenario repeated in Nepal Open Data Index 2015, which highlights the understanding of Open Data in the local cities of Nepal is very poor.  Open Data is steadily gaining momentum in Nepal, led by Civil Society, and joined by handful of government agencies. The progress made is slow. The reasons for slow uptake of open data practices are many. One of them is that a state of confusion is created when people do not know about the meaning and benefits of Open Data due to lack of proper guidance and resources. We are trying to localize Open Data Handbook in Nepali. We believe this Open Data Handbook Nepali Version will help Government policy makers, leaders and common citizens to understand about Data in their Native language easily and CSO can take their awareness program in next level by using the resources.   Need of Open Data Handbook in Nepal We live in the generation where people want their government to be more Transparent and Accountable than ever and want to be engaged with every kinds of government decisions and activities to increase innovation & efficiency, which will lead their country towards sustainable development. The only way for the government to increase the citizens’ engagement in government activities and to increase transparency is Open Data. “Open Data is data that can be freely used, reused and redistributed by anyone – subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and sharealike.” Open Data not only increases transparency and accountability, but also promotes greater efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of public services by allowing users to easily consume and interpret data. Recent years have witnessed considerable enthusiasm over the opportunities offered by open data. Across sectors, it is widely believed today that we are entering a new era of information openness and transparency, and that this has the potential to spur economic innovation, social transformation, and fresh forms of political and government accountability. Yet despite the evident potential of open data, and despite the growing amounts of information being released by governments and corporations, little is actually known about its use and impact. The condition of its is more poor in Nepal because Nepal lack resources in Native language for Open Data awareness. This Nepali Version Handbook will works as an perfect resource which government and CSO can use for awareness program. Open Data Handbook (first issued in 2010 and regularly updated) is the guide to open data, and especially open government data is the project of Open Knowledge International. It has been translated into more than 18 languages including Chinese, English, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish, and has been used by governments and civil society organisations around the world as an introduction and blue-print for open data projects.   Who is leading Open Data Handbook Nepali Version Open Knowledge Nepal the working group of Open Knowledge International in Nepal is leading the project. Open Knowledge is a nonprofit based in Cambridge, United Kingdom. In Nepal, Open Knowledge Nepal works as an open network of young people who are passionate about open data, open science, open development, and openness in general. Members of Open Knowledge Nepal have been working with other governmental and non-governmental organizations in works related to open knowledge, especially open data and open government data. The family of the group contains professors, students, activists, journalists, government officers from various fields as an members and supporters. Open Data and Transparency is one of the oldest thematic areas for the group and has been engaged with it since a while. The group has been involved in research, advocacy, training, organizing meetups and hackathons, and developing tools related to Open Data, Open Access, Open Development and others. It is a non-profit open network of open knowledge enthusiasts and was founded in 2013.   Methodology
  1. Collecting and Finalizing resources in English language (Please find the draft here)
  2. Translating the Resources
  3. Review of Translation from Experts
  4. Designing and Finalizing Handbook
  5. Printing and Launch
  6. Free printed book distribution within Government Organization
  The name of the Individual or Organization Funders will be written in the book explicitly. Interested organization and individual can contact project co-ordinator: nikeshbalami@gmail.com for more information.

Fundraising for Open Data Handbook Nepali Version

- August 5, 2016 in Book, nepal, Open Data, Open Data Handbook, Open Data Nepal, project

Open Data Barometer 2015, a global annual survey that measures and ranks the availability, readiness, and impact of open (government) data of nations ranked Nepal at position 68 among 92 countries surveyed. Nepal’s overall score is 13.09, Readiness score is 22, Implementation score is 12, and Impact score is 8. The scores are relative to world leader UK’s score of 100 in all measures – readiness, implementation, and impact. The scoring and rankings are comparable in other surveys, including the Open Knowledge’s Global Open Data Index in 2014 and 2015. This gives us a clear picture of state of Open Government Data in Nepal that Nepal’s government can be more open by implementing open government plans and actions and increasing the impact of open data on overall economy of Nepal. This is actually a decrease in Nepal’s ranking compared to Open Data Barometer 2014 by 7 places. Nepal scored similar grades in 2014 as it did in 2015. The decrease in ranking, even though the scoring is similar helps us to understand that while Nepal has made no significant progress towards an open government, other countries leapfrogged Nepal. The same scenario repeated in Nepal Open Data Index 2015, which highlights the understanding of Open Data in the local cities of Nepal is very poor.  Open Data is steadily gaining momentum in Nepal, led by Civil Society, and joined by handful of government agencies. The progress made is slow. The reasons for slow uptake of open data practices are many. One of them is that a state of confusion is created when people do not know about the meaning and benefits of Open Data due to lack of proper guidance and resources. We are trying to localize Open Data Handbook in Nepali. We believe this Open Data Handbook Nepali Version will help Government policy makers, leaders and common citizens to understand about Data in their Native language easily and CSO can take their awareness program in next level by using the resources.   Need of Open Data Handbook in Nepal We live in the generation where people want their government to be more Transparent and Accountable than ever and want to be engaged with every kinds of government decisions and activities to increase innovation & efficiency, which will lead their country towards sustainable development. The only way for the government to increase the citizens’ engagement in government activities and to increase transparency is Open Data. “Open Data is data that can be freely used, reused and redistributed by anyone – subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and sharealike.” Open Data not only increases transparency and accountability, but also promotes greater efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of public services by allowing users to easily consume and interpret data. Recent years have witnessed considerable enthusiasm over the opportunities offered by open data. Across sectors, it is widely believed today that we are entering a new era of information openness and transparency, and that this has the potential to spur economic innovation, social transformation, and fresh forms of political and government accountability. Yet despite the evident potential of open data, and despite the growing amounts of information being released by governments and corporations, little is actually known about its use and impact. The condition of its is more poor in Nepal because Nepal lack resources in Native language for Open Data awareness. This Nepali Version Handbook will works as an perfect resource which government and CSO can use for awareness program. Open Data Handbook (first issued in 2010 and regularly updated) is the guide to open data, and especially open government data is the project of Open Knowledge International. It has been translated into more than 18 languages including Chinese, English, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish, and has been used by governments and civil society organisations around the world as an introduction and blue-print for open data projects.   Who is leading Open Data Handbook Nepali Version Open Knowledge Nepal the working group of Open Knowledge International in Nepal is leading the project. Open Knowledge is a nonprofit based in Cambridge, United Kingdom. In Nepal, Open Knowledge Nepal works as an open network of young people who are passionate about open data, open science, open development, and openness in general. Members of Open Knowledge Nepal have been working with other governmental and non-governmental organizations in works related to open knowledge, especially open data and open government data. The family of the group contains professors, students, activists, journalists, government officers from various fields as an members and supporters. Open Data and Transparency is one of the oldest thematic areas for the group and has been engaged with it since a while. The group has been involved in research, advocacy, training, organizing meetups and hackathons, and developing tools related to Open Data, Open Access, Open Development and others. It is a non-profit open network of open knowledge enthusiasts and was founded in 2013.   Methodology
  1. Collecting and Finalizing resources in English language (Please find the draft here)
  2. Translating the Resources
  3. Review of Translation from Experts
  4. Designing and Finalizing Handbook
  5. Printing and Launch (Targeting Software Freedom Day 2016)
  6. Free printed book distribution within Government Organization
  Budget Estimation
S.N Particulars Quantity Cost (In NRS) Cost (In USD)
1 Handbook Coordinator 1 Person 10,000 100$
2 Translator 5 Person 25,000 250$
3 Printing, Launch and Distribution 60,000 600$
Total 95,000 950$
The name of the Individual or Organization Funders will be written in the book explicitly. Interested Organization or Individual can contact: nikeshbalami@gmail.com for more information.

Fundraising for Open Data Handbook Nepali Version

- August 5, 2016 in Book, nepal, Open Data, Open Data Handbook, Open Data Nepal, project

Open Data Barometer 2015, a global annual survey that measures and ranks the availability, readiness, and impact of open (government) data of nations ranked Nepal at position 68 among 92 countries surveyed. Nepal’s overall score is 13.09, Readiness score is 22, Implementation score is 12, and Impact score is 8. The scores are relative to world leader UK’s score of 100 in all measures – readiness, implementation, and impact. The scoring and rankings are comparable in other surveys, including the Open Knowledge’s Global Open Data Index in 2014 and 2015. This gives us a clear picture of state of Open Government Data in Nepal that Nepal’s government can be more open by implementing open government plans and actions and increasing the impact of open data on overall economy of Nepal. This is actually a decrease in Nepal’s ranking compared to Open Data Barometer 2014 by 7 places. Nepal scored similar grades in 2014 as it did in 2015. The decrease in ranking, even though the scoring is similar helps us to understand that while Nepal has made no significant progress towards an open government, other countries leapfrogged Nepal. The same scenario repeated in Nepal Open Data Index 2015, which highlights the understanding of Open Data in the local cities of Nepal is very poor.  Open Data is steadily gaining momentum in Nepal, led by Civil Society, and joined by handful of government agencies. The progress made is slow. The reasons for slow uptake of open data practices are many. One of them is that a state of confusion is created when people do not know about the meaning and benefits of Open Data due to lack of proper guidance and resources. We are trying to localize Open Data Handbook in Nepali. We believe this Open Data Handbook Nepali Version will help Government policy makers, leaders and common citizens to understand about Data in their Native language easily and CSO can take their awareness program in next level by using the resources.   Need of Open Data Handbook in Nepal We live in the generation where people want their government to be more Transparent and Accountable than ever and want to be engaged with every kinds of government decisions and activities to increase innovation & efficiency, which will lead their country towards sustainable development. The only way for the government to increase the citizens’ engagement in government activities and to increase transparency is Open Data. “Open Data is data that can be freely used, reused and redistributed by anyone – subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and sharealike.” Open Data not only increases transparency and accountability, but also promotes greater efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of public services by allowing users to easily consume and interpret data. Recent years have witnessed considerable enthusiasm over the opportunities offered by open data. Across sectors, it is widely believed today that we are entering a new era of information openness and transparency, and that this has the potential to spur economic innovation, social transformation, and fresh forms of political and government accountability. Yet despite the evident potential of open data, and despite the growing amounts of information being released by governments and corporations, little is actually known about its use and impact. The condition of its is more poor in Nepal because Nepal lack resources in Native language for Open Data awareness. This Nepali Version Handbook will works as an perfect resource which government and CSO can use for awareness program. Open Data Handbook (first issued in 2010 and regularly updated) is the guide to open data, and especially open government data is the project of Open Knowledge International. It has been translated into more than 18 languages including Chinese, English, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish, and has been used by governments and civil society organisations around the world as an introduction and blue-print for open data projects.   Who is leading Open Data Handbook Nepali Version Open Knowledge Nepal the working group of Open Knowledge International in Nepal is leading the project. Open Knowledge is a nonprofit based in Cambridge, United Kingdom. In Nepal, Open Knowledge Nepal works as an open network of young people who are passionate about open data, open science, open development, and openness in general. Members of Open Knowledge Nepal have been working with other governmental and non-governmental organizations in works related to open knowledge, especially open data and open government data. The family of the group contains professors, students, activists, journalists, government officers from various fields as an members and supporters. Open Data and Transparency is one of the oldest thematic areas for the group and has been engaged with it since a while. The group has been involved in research, advocacy, training, organizing meetups and hackathons, and developing tools related to Open Data, Open Access, Open Development and others. It is a non-profit open network of open knowledge enthusiasts and was founded in 2013.   Methodology
  1. Collecting and Finalizing resources in English language (Please find the draft here)
  2. Translating the Resources
  3. Review of Translation from Experts
  4. Designing and Finalizing Handbook
  5. Printing and Launch
  6. Free printed book distribution within Government Organization
  Budget Estimation
S.N Particulars Quantity Cost (In NRS) Cost (In USD)
1 Handbook Coordinator 1 Person 10,000 100$
2 Translator 5 Person 25,000 250$
3 Printing, Launch and Distribution 60,000 600$
Total 95,000 950$
The name of the Individual or Organization Funders will be written in the book explicitly. Interested Organization or Individual can contact: nikeshbalami@gmail.com for more information.

Νέα ερευνητική εργασία πάνω στα ανοιχτά δεδομένα

- April 26, 2015 in Featured, Featured @en, News, Open Knowledge, project, ανοιχτά δεδομένα, Προϋπολογισμός

Ένα νέο ερευνητικό project ξεκινάει με σκοπό την εξέταση και ανάλυση της επιρροής των ανοιχτών δεδομένων αναφορικά με τους προϋπολογισμούς. Πρόκειται για μια συνεργατική δουλειά ανάμεσα στο  Open Knowledge (Ίδρυμα Ανοιχτών Δεδομένων) και στο Digital Methods Initiative (Τμήμα Ψηφιακών Μεθόδων) του πανεπιστημίου του Άμστερνταμ, η οποία υποστηρίζεται και χρηματοδοτείται από το Global Initiative for Financial Transparency (GIFT). Αναλυτικότερα, η εργασία θα περιλαμβάνει μια εμπειρική χαρτογράφηση όσων δραστηριοποιούνται στα ανοιχτά δεδομένα προϋπολογισμών σε όλο τον κόσμο, καθώς, επίσης, και των κύριων ζητημάτων, ευκαιριών και προκλήσεων που υπάρχουν σε κάθε διαφορετικό συμμετέχoντα. Βασικός στόχος αυτής της χαρτογράφησης είναι να παρέχει  μια ανάλυση των διάφορων ορισμών και θεωριών σχετικά με τα ανοιχτά δεδομένα προϋπολογισμών, επιχειρήματα για την σημασία τους, πολύ καλές πρακτικές εξάσκησης για δημοσίευση και δέσμευση, όπως και εφαρμογές σε διάφορες χώρες σε όλο τον κόσμο. Εκτός από την εκτενή εμπειρία και τεχνογνωσία που θα λάβει από το Open Knowledge σχετικά με τα ανοιχτά δεδομένα προϋπολογισμών (μέσα από προγράμματα, όπως το Open Spending), η εργασία θα κάνει χρήση καινοτόμων εργαλείων και μεθόδων που αναπτύχθηκαν από το Πανεπιστήμιο του Άμστερνταμ ώστε να αξιοποιήσει αποδείξεις από το διαδίκτυο, τα μέσα κοινωνικής δικτύωσης και συλλογές αρχείων που θα ενημερώσουν και θα εμπλουτίσουν την ανάλυσή τους. Ως μέρος αυτής της εργασίας ξεκινούν μια συνεργατική βιβλιογραφία από υπάρχουσες έρευνες και βιβλιογραφίες για τα ανοιχτά δεδομένα προϋπολογισμού και σχετικών θεμάτων, τα οποία ελπίζουν ότι θα αποτελέσουν μια χρήσιμη πηγή για άλλους οργανισμούς, δικηγόρους, για αυτούς που χαράσσουν πολιτική και ερευνητές που δουλεύουν πάνω σ’ αυτό το αντικείμενο. Όποιος έχει τη δική του πρόταση για πρόσθετα αντικείμενα μπορεί να έρθει σε επαφή με τους αρμόδιους. Αυτό το project αποτελεί συνέχεια άλλων ερευνητικών project που διεξήγαν γύρω από το πεδίο αυτό – συμπεριλαμβανομένου του «πρότυπα δεδομένων για την φορολογική διαφάνεια», του «τεχνολογία για τη διαφανή και υπεύθυνη δημόσια οικονομία» και του «χαρτογραφώντας την κοινωνία των ανοιχτών δεδομένων των δαπανών». Τα τελευταία χρόνια, λόγω της εξέλιξης του διαδικτύου, έχει αυξηθεί και η ανάγκη για πρόσβαση σε όλο και περίσσοτερα δεδομένα. Πολλές εργασίες και πρωτοβουλίες λαμβάνουν χώρα με σκοπό να επιτευχθεί και να καλυφθεί αυτή η ανάγκη, όπως είναι και αυτή σχετικά με τους προϋπολογισμούς που παρουσιάστηκε παραπάνω. Πρόκειται για σημαντικές πρωτοβουλίες που στοχεύουν στην ανάπτυξη και εξέλιξη αυτού του κλάδου και είναι πολύ σημαντικό να “αγκαλιαστούν” από το σύνολο των χρηστών. Ας ελπίσουμε, βέβαια, ότι  αυτή η διαφάνεια και η ανοικτότητα των δεδομένων θα αξιοποιηθεί συνετά από το σύνολο των χρηστών του διαδικτύου. data Δίκτυο οικονομικής διαφάνειας με το εργαλείο  Issuecrawler που βασίζεται σε υπερανάλυση,  ξεκινώντας από τα μέλη του  συνασπισμού Οικονομικής Διαφάνειας στις 12 Ιανουαρίου 2015. Πηγή: Open Knowledge and Digital Methods Initiative. To Open Knowledge Foundation (OKF) (στα Ελληνικά: Ίδρυμα Ανοικτής Γνώσης) είναι μία μη κερδοσκοπική οργάνωση που προωθεί την ανοικτή γνώση και τα ανοιχτά δεδομένα. Ιδρύθηκε στις 24 Μαΐου 2004 στο Κέμπριτζ. Το ίδρυμα δημοσίευσε το Open Knowledge Definition και έτρεξε αρκετά πρότζεκτ, όπως το CKAN, το λογισμικό που χρησιμοποιείται από πολλές κυβερνήσεις για τα δικά τους έργα ανοικτών δεδομένων όπως το Where Does My Money Go, τρόπος για την παρακολούθηση των κυβερνητικών εξόδων. Εκτός από τα τεχνικά εργαλεία, το ίδρυμα παρέχει πληροφορίες και συμβουλές γύρω από τα ζητήματα ανοικτών δεδομένων. Για παράδειγμα, συνέβαλε στη δημιουργία του Open Database Licence (ODbL) και του Open Knowledge Definition. data1

Πηγή: https://www.digitalmethods.net/pub/Digitalmethods/WebHome/glasvegels.jpg

Πηγή άρθρου: https://blog.okfn.org/2015/03/04/new-research-project-to-map-the-impact-of-open-budget-data/ Ονόματα φοιτητών: Όλγα Καλατζή, Αλέξανδρος Παντελάκης, Ελένη Σκρίμπα, Βενετία Κυριαζίδου.

Creating an online discussion, knowledge sharing, voting and project development platform.

- May 7, 2012 in democracy, direct, e-democracy, forum, project

http://www.quora.com/Online-Governance -> related projects, general information and principles http://www.quora.com/Erik-Willekens/Online-governance-The-Basic-Setup -> my personal concept, ideas and mockups How could we build a discussion platform to solve complex and international problems? How could the structure of discussions on complex problems be translated to an online interface in order for a community to collaborate on solving those problems? I think our world needs an online governance platform. A platform which allows people to facilitate, discuss, mediate, structure, build up and understand issues, solutions and knowledge. A collaborative platform where everyone could work on policy and debate and make things happen. This could be all areas: personal, community, political, corporate and organisational, NGO and non-profit governance. The idea is to weigh, discuss, structure and mediate projects/questions/problems that arrive from a community-based website comparable to, yet more complex than Quora. I'm developing a workflow which could serve as an example. Please let me know if you'd like to join the brainstorm. ErikWillekens@gmail.com Skype: erikwillekens 0486 66 10 84