You are browsing the archive for proportion.

Elephants, Horses, and the Proportions of Paradise

- November 5, 2018 in Art & Illustrations, geometry, how to draw, ideal elephant, ideal horse, noah's ark, paradise, perfect elephant, perfect horse, proportion

Does each species have an optimal form? An ideal beauty that existed prior to the Fall? And if so could this be recreated on both paper and in life? These were questions that concerned both artists and breeders alike in the 17th-century. Dániel Margócsy on the search for a menagerie of perfect prelapsarian geometry.

The Tibetan Book of Proportions

- March 11, 2014 in buddha, buddhism, geometry, nepal, proportion, tibet

An eighteenth-century pattern book consisting of 36 ink drawings showing precise…

The Tibetan Book of Proportions

- March 11, 2014 in buddha, buddhism, geometry, nepal, proportion, tibet

An eighteenth-century pattern book consisting of 36 ink drawings showing precise…

Jehan Cousin’s Livre de Pourtraiture (1608)

- February 11, 2013 in anatomy, collections, geometry, Images, Images-16th, Images-17th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-People, Images-Science, proportion, the body

Selected images from a 1608 edition of Livre de Pourtraiture by Jehan Cousin the Younger (ca. 1522–1595), son of of the famous painter and sculptor Jehan Cousin the Elder (ca. 1490-ca. 1560) who was often compared to his contemporary, Albrecht Dürer. Just before his death, Jehan the Elder published his noted work Livre de Perspective in 1560 in which he noted that his son would soon be publishing a companion entitled, Livre de Pourtraiture. While there have been some reports that an edition of Livre de Pourtraiture was fist printed in 1571 and again in 1589, no copies appear to exist. Instead, the most likely first printing of the work was 1595 in Paris by David Leclerc, with woodcuts engraved by Jean Leclerc, just after Jehan Cousin the Younger’s death. The book is one of the most famous on the subject of artistic anatomy and was printed again and again into the late 17th century. (All images from the U.S. National Library of Medicine). DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable [...]