You are browsing the archive for punch.

A Vision of Isolating Technology from 1906

- July 27, 2016 in future history, future technologies, futurism, punch, punch magazine, retrofuturism, smartphone, smartphone zombies, smombie, technology, telegarph

Punch magazine's vision of the smartphone zombie from 1906.

A Vision of Isolating Technology from 1906

- July 27, 2016 in future history, future technologies, futurism, punch, punch magazine, retrofuturism, smartphone, smartphone zombies, smombie, technology, telegarph

Punch magazine's vision of the smartphone zombie from 1906.

A Vision of Isolating Technology from 1906

- July 27, 2016 in future history, future technologies, futurism, punch, punch magazine, retrofuturism, smartphone, smartphone zombies, smombie, technology, telegarph

Punch magazine's vision of the smartphone zombie from 1906.

A Vision of Isolating Technology from 1906

- July 27, 2016 in future history, future technologies, futurism, punch, punch magazine, retrofuturism, smartphone, smartphone zombies, smombie, technology, telegarph

Punch magazine's vision of the smartphone zombie from 1906.

The Telephonoscope (1879)

- November 10, 2015 in edison, future history, future technologies, futurism, futurology, George du Maurier, history of the future, punch, retro-future, retrofuture, victorian, Victorian Skype, Victorian technology

An 1879 depiction of an imagined communication device which, for all intents and purposes, amounts to some kind of Victorian Skype.

The Telephonoscope (1879)

- November 10, 2015 in edison, future history, future technologies, futurism, futurology, George du Maurier, historical predictions of the future, history of the future, punch, retro-future, retrofuture, steampunk, victorian, Victorian Skype, Victorian technology

Device imagined in a Punch cartoon from 1879, predicting the advent of video chat more than 100 years before Skype.

The Eternal Guffaw: John Leech and The Comic History of Rome

- February 25, 2015 in Art & Illustrations, Books, caricature, cartoons, history of rome, john leech, punch, punch magazine, romans, victorian

At the beginning of the 1850s, two stalwarts from the heart of London-based satiric…

The Diary of a Nobody (1919 edition)

- October 28, 2011 in diary of a nobody, fictional diary, George Grossmith, non-article, pooter, punch, texts, Weedon Grossmith


The Diary of a Nobody, by George Grossmith and Weedon Grossmith; 1919 4th edition; J.W. Arrowsmith, Bristol.

This fictitious diary details fifteen months in the life of Mr. Charles Pooter, a middle aged city clerk of lower middle-class status but significant social aspirations, living in the fictional ‘Brickfield Terrace’ in London. The diary was written by George Grossmith and his brother Weedon Grossmith who also contributed the illustrations. It first appeared in Punch magazine through the years 1888 – 89, and was first printed in book form in 1892. Due to much of the humour deriving from Mr. Pooter’s comical tendency toward self-importance, the book has spawned the word “Pooterish” to describe the taking of oneself excessively seriously.

Open Library link



Letters From a Cat (1879)

Castaway on the Auckland Isles: A Narrative of the Wreck of the "Grafton," (1865)


Infant's Cabinet of Birds and Beasts (1820)

Old French Fairytales (1920)

Armata: a fragment (1817)

An Account of the Late Improvements in Galvanism (1803)

The Medical Aspects of Death, and the Medical Aspects of the Human Mind (1852)

Quarles' Emblems (1886)

Cat and bird stories from the "Spectator" (1896)

Wonderful Balloon Ascents (1870)

The Book of Topiary (1904)

The Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (1899)

English as She is Spoke (1884)

The Danger of Premature Interment (1816)

The Last American (1889)

Pirates (1922)

Napoleon's Oraculum (1839)

Horse Laughs (1891)

Hydriotaphia/Urn-Burial and The Garden of Cyrus (1658)

Across the Zodiac: the Story of a Wrecked Record (1880)

Superstitions About Animals (1904)

The Diary of a Nobody (1919 edition)

The Attitudes of Animals in Motion, Illustrated with the Zoopraxiscope (1882)

The Eccentric Mirror: Reflecting a Faithful and Interesting Delineation of Male and Female Characters, Ancient and Modern (1807)