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Office of Company Registrar Nepal joined the momentum

- August 21, 2016 in Featured, godi, Index, nepal, OCR Nepal, Open Data, ranking

Sometimes small key points makes you happy and boost your determination. My recent visit to the Office of the Company Registrar Nepal website makes me feel that way. The reason for my happiness  with the website is pretty straightforward – I was happy because I found a page named “Data” in the site with whole bunch of data, and more importantly the data were in an Open Format. Although the momentum of Open Data is gaining momentum all over the country, these kinds of government initiative are very rare and countable. Kudos goes to Nepal Government, their partners and CSO for pushing this momentum forward: http://www.ocr.gov.np/index.php/en/data OCR Nepal   The Office of Company Registrar Nepal website now consists data regarding company registration from 2002 till 2072 BS and the data is available for everyone to download and reuse in CSV and XML format. They have embarked this OCR Open Government Data (OGD) initiative to increase access to company data and wants to create ecosystem of  OGD to increase usability of data and realize the benefits. As we (Open Knowledge Nepal) discuss lots of times regarding the roles played by central government of Nepal for adopting open data as a policy, and the commitments shown by them through some projects such as the Aid Management Platform, Election Data in our blogs, events, projects and researches. This initiative of Office of the Company Registrar Nepal can now be a perfect examples for others public bodies of Nepal. It will also help Nepal to improve its rankings in the global Open Data surveys like Global Open Data Index and Open Data Barometer. I still remember those disappointing moments when Company Register gain only 35% open in Global Open Data Index 2015, all because the data wasn’t available in bulk and wasn’t machine readable. Now slowly but steadily we can mark those changes and gain 100% open. GODI Nepal This is a good start of the long Open Data journey from Nepal Government. Still, we can do much better. This kinds of start from our Government also boost the enthusiasm and determination of all CSO who are working in the field of Open Data at Nepal.  

Office of Company Registrar Nepal joined the momentum

- August 21, 2016 in Featured, godi, Index, nepal, OCR Nepal, Open Data, ranking

Sometimes small key points makes you happy and boost your determination. My recent visit to the Office of the Company Registrar Nepal website makes me feel that way. The reason for my happiness  with the website is pretty straightforward – I was happy because I found a page named “Data” in the site with whole bunch of data, and more importantly the data were in an Open Format. Although the momentum of Open Data is gaining momentum all over the country, these kinds of government initiative are very rare and countable. Kudos goes to Nepal Government, their partners and CSO for pushing this momentum forward: http://www.ocr.gov.np/index.php/en/data OCR Nepal   The Office of Company Registrar Nepal website now consists data regarding company registration from 2002 till 2072 BS and the data is available for everyone to download and reuse in CSV and XML format. They have embarked this OCR Open Government Data (OGD) initiative to increase access to company data and wants to create ecosystem of  OGD to increase usability of data and realize the benefits. As we (Open Knowledge Nepal) discuss lots of times regarding the roles played by central government of Nepal for adopting open data as a policy, and the commitments shown by them through some projects such as the Aid Management Platform, Election Data in our blogs, events, projects and researches. This initiative of Office of the Company Registrar Nepal can now be a perfect examples for others public bodies of Nepal. It will also help Nepal to improve its rankings in the global Open Data surveys like Global Open Data Index and Open Data Barometer. I still remember those disappointing moments when Company Register gain only 35% open in Global Open Data Index 2015, all because the data wasn’t available in bulk and wasn’t machine readable. Now slowly but steadily we can mark those changes and gain 100% open. GODI Nepal This is a good start of the long Open Data journey from Nepal Government. Still, we can do much better. This kinds of start from our Government also boost the enthusiasm and determination of all CSO who are working in the field of Open Data at Nepal.  

Office of Company Registrar Nepal joined the momentum

- August 21, 2016 in Featured, godi, Index, nepal, OCR Nepal, Open Data, ranking

Sometimes small key points makes you happy and boost your determination. My recent visit to the Office of the Company Registrar Nepal website makes me feel that way. The reason for my happiness  with the website is pretty straightforward – I was happy because I found a page named “Data” in the site with whole bunch of data, and more importantly the data were in an Open Format. Although the momentum of Open Data is gaining momentum all over the country, these kinds of government initiative are very rare and countable. Kudos goes to Nepal Government, their partners and CSO for pushing this momentum forward: http://www.ocr.gov.np/index.php/en/data

OCR Nepal

 

The Office of Company Registrar Nepal website now consists data regarding company registration from 2002 till 2072 BS and the data is available for everyone to download and reuse in CSV and XML format. They have embarked this OCR Open Government Data (OGD) initiative to increase access to company data and wants to create ecosystem of  OGD to increase usability of data and realize the benefits.

As we (Open Knowledge Nepal) discuss lots of times regarding the roles played by central government of Nepal for adopting open data as a policy, and the commitments shown by them through some projects such as the Aid Management Platform, Election Data in our blogs, events, projects and researches. This initiative of Office of the Company Registrar Nepal can now be a perfect examples for others public bodies of Nepal. It will also help Nepal to improve its rankings in the global Open Data surveys like Global Open Data Index and Open Data Barometer.

I still remember those disappointing moments when Company Register gain only 35% open in Global Open Data Index 2015, all because the data wasn’t available in bulk and wasn’t machine readable. Now slowly but steadily we can mark those changes and gain 100% open.

GODI Nepal

This is a good start of the long Open Data journey from Nepal Government. Still, we can do much better. This kinds of start from our Government also boost the enthusiasm and determination of all CSO who are working in the field of Open Data at Nepal.

 

Office of Company Registrar Nepal joined the momentum

- August 21, 2016 in Featured, godi, Index, nepal, OCR Nepal, Open Data, ranking

Sometimes small key points makes you happy and boost your determination. My recent visit to the Office of the Company Registrar Nepal website makes me feel that way. The reason for my happiness  with the website is pretty straightforward – I was happy because I found a page named “Data” in the site with whole bunch of data, and more importantly the data were in an Open Format. Although the momentum of Open Data is gaining momentum all over the country, these kinds of government initiative are very rare and countable. Kudos goes to Nepal Government, their partners and CSO for pushing this momentum forward: http://www.ocr.gov.np/index.php/en/data OCR Nepal   The Office of Company Registrar Nepal website now consists data regarding company registration from 2002 till 2072 BS and the data is available for everyone to download and reuse in CSV and XML format. They have embarked this OCR Open Government Data (OGD) initiative to increase access to company data and wants to create ecosystem of  OGD to increase usability of data and realize the benefits. As we (Open Knowledge Nepal) discuss lots of times regarding the roles played by central government of Nepal for adopting open data as a policy, and the commitments shown by them through some projects such as the Aid Management Platform, Election Data in our blogs, events, projects and researches. This initiative of Office of the Company Registrar Nepal can now be a perfect examples for others public bodies of Nepal. It will also help Nepal to improve its rankings in the global Open Data surveys like Global Open Data Index and Open Data Barometer. I still remember those disappointing moments when Company Register gain only 35% open in Global Open Data Index 2015, all because the data wasn’t available in bulk and wasn’t machine readable. Now slowly but steadily we can mark those changes and gain 100% open. GODI Nepal This is a good start of the long Open Data journey from Nepal Government. Still, we can do much better. This kinds of start from our Government also boost the enthusiasm and determination of all CSO who are working in the field of Open Data at Nepal.  

Belgium in the Open Data Barometer: Half way through

- April 22, 2016 in barometer, Featured, Open Data, Open Data News, ranking

Yesterday the World Wide Web Foundation has released the third edition of the Open Data Barometer. A collaborative research that covers 92 countries and ranks them by three key parameters: readiness (how prepared are governments regarding open data initiatives?), implementation (are governments putting their commitments into practice?) and impact (is open government data being used in ways that result in practical benefits?). Let’s take a closer look at how Belgium did this year. ODB_Belgium So is the glass half full or half empty? Belgium’s score is 52,62 out of 100 points which puts us half way through the open data barometer. Since the current edition is the third one, it allows us to search for trends in the country’s performance. For instance, 2014 was sort of a breakthrough year for many countries, with Belgium jumping from 34,8 points to 47,29, whereas this year it is only 5,33 points higher. Belgium is sharing the 22nd position with Iceland (same as last year). This is still growth, although a detailed look at the data gives some food for thought. Up is down and down is up Throughout all three years that this research is being carried out, Belgium has been performing steadily in terms of readiness – 72, 86 and 80 points out of 100 in 2013, 2014 and 2015 respectively. Moreover, our state is performing better than average among its neighbors by parameters such as ‘Government Action’, ‘Citizens and Civil Rights’ and ‘Entrepreneurs and Business’. At the same time, the scores for both ‘Readiness’ and ‘Implementations’ have slightly declined from 2014, which leaves ‘Impact’ as the sole parameter on which Belgium has actually progressed (from 30 to 48). This is actually good news, since impact was Belgium’s weakest point – and still is. ‘Political Impact’ is the parameter by which Belgium is performing much weaker than the average in the region of Europe and Central Asia. It received ‘0’ for the question ‘To what extent has open data had a noticeable impact on increasing government efficiency and effectiveness?’ ODB_top_10 The neighborhood You might get jealous of France – and for a good reason. This country can provide you, not only cheese and wine, but a sheer amount of open data too, making it number 3 right next to the USA in the world ranking. Netherlands, on the contrary, lost one position in the ranking, descending to number 7. However, if you look at the top 10, you will find only 5 European countries up there. This might change even more: the new generation of open data adopters is going to challenge traditional stalwarts such as USA and UK. ‘The need to robust the data to drive democracy and development’  which is clear – is one of the key findings of the ODB. First world problems Now, you might call it a first world problem, but only being in the first quarter of the list can be not that great. What can Belgium do to not be stuck in the ranking, slowly backsliding while the other countries are catching up? The unique bilingual setting of Belgium and the subsequent division and subdivision of its authorities are among the main reasons that explain its low impact performance. Whereas in the developing countries, the whole issue of governments opening their data is revolutionary, developed countries seem to suffer from inconsistencies between the readiness of society for open data and its impact. This only proves the other key funding of the survey: the open data community needs to translate open data policy into real implementation. If we lose the moment, ‘open data could fade into a ghost town of abandoned pilots, outdated data portals and unused apps’. The release of data per se is only the beginning of the story, not its end. You need individuals, communities and companies who can use and reuse the open data for good, which does not exclude their businesses by the way. You need general public awareness of open data, the same way it is being informed about the importance of having fresh water and clean air. Open data has to stop being a geeky and nerdy term – it has to come to every house and make the difference on how you see the world. This is what they call impact.    

Belgium in the Open Data Barometer: Half way through

- April 22, 2016 in barometer, Featured, Open Data, Open Data News, ranking

Yesterday the World Wide Web Foundation has released the third edition of the Open Data Barometer. A collaborative research that covers 92 countries and ranks them by three key parameters: readiness (how prepared are governments regarding open data initiatives?), implementation (are governments putting their commitments into practice?) and impact (is open government data being used in ways that result in practical benefits?). Let’s take a closer look at how Belgium did this year. ODB_Belgium So is the glass half full or half empty? Belgium’s score is 52,62 out of 100 points which puts us half way through the open data barometer. Since the current edition is the third one, it allows us to search for trends in the country’s performance. For instance, 2014 was sort of a breakthrough year for many countries, with Belgium jumping from 34,8 points to 47,29, whereas this year it is only 5,33 points higher. Belgium is sharing the 22nd position with Iceland (same as last year). This is still growth, although a detailed look at the data gives some food for thought. Up is down and down is up Throughout all three years that this research is being carried out, Belgium has been performing steadily in terms of readiness – 72, 86 and 80 points out of 100 in 2013, 2014 and 2015 respectively. Moreover, our state is performing better than average among its neighbors by parameters such as ‘Government Action’, ‘Citizens and Civil Rights’ and ‘Entrepreneurs and Business’. At the same time, the scores for both ‘Readiness’ and ‘Implementations’ have slightly declined from 2014, which leaves ‘Impact’ as the sole parameter on which Belgium has actually progressed (from 30 to 48). This is actually good news, since impact was Belgium’s weakest point – and still is. ‘Political Impact’ is the parameter by which Belgium is performing much weaker than the average in the region of Europe and Central Asia. It received ‘0’ for the question ‘To what extent has open data had a noticeable impact on increasing government efficiency and effectiveness?’ ODB_top_10 The neighborhood You might get jealous of France – and for a good reason. This country can provide you, not only cheese and wine, but a sheer amount of open data too, making it number 3 right next to the USA in the world ranking. Netherlands, on the contrary, lost one position in the ranking, descending to number 7. However, if you look at the top 10, you will find only 5 European countries up there. This might change even more: the new generation of open data adopters is going to challenge traditional stalwarts such as USA and UK. ‘The need to robust the data to drive democracy and development’  which is clear – is one of the key findings of the ODB. First world problems Now, you might call it a first world problem, but only being in the first quarter of the list can be not that great. What can Belgium do to not be stuck in the ranking, slowly backsliding while the other countries are catching up? The unique bilingual setting of Belgium and the subsequent division and subdivision of its authorities are among the main reasons that explain its low impact performance. Whereas in the developing countries, the whole issue of governments opening their data is revolutionary, developed countries seem to suffer from inconsistencies between the readiness of society for open data and its impact. This only proves the other key funding of the survey: the open data community needs to translate open data policy into real implementation. If we lose the moment, ‘open data could fade into a ghost town of abandoned pilots, outdated data portals and unused apps’. The release of data per se is only the beginning of the story, not its end. You need individuals, communities and companies who can use and reuse the open data for good, which does not exclude their businesses by the way. You need general public awareness of open data, the same way it is being informed about the importance of having fresh water and clean air. Open data has to stop being a geeky and nerdy term – it has to come to every house and make the difference on how you see the world. This is what they call impact.    

Belgium in the Open Data Barometer: Half way through

- April 22, 2016 in barometer, Featured, Open Data, Open Data News, ranking

Yesterday the World Wide Web Foundation has released the third edition of the Open Data Barometer. A collaborative research that covers 92 countries and ranks them by three key parameters: readiness (how prepared are governments regarding open data initiatives?), implementation (are governments putting their commitments into practice?) and impact (is open government data being used in ways that result in practical benefits?). Let’s take a closer look at how Belgium did this year. ODB_Belgium So is the glass half full or half empty? Belgium’s score is 52,62 out of 100 points which puts us half way through the open data barometer. Since the current edition is the third one, it allows us to search for trends in the country’s performance. For instance, 2014 was sort of a breakthrough year for many countries, with Belgium jumping from 34,8 points to 47,29, whereas this year it is only 5,33 points higher. Belgium is sharing the 22nd position with Iceland (same as last year). This is still growth, although a detailed look at the data gives some food for thought. Up is down and down is up Throughout all three years that this research is being carried out, Belgium has been performing steadily in terms of readiness – 72, 86 and 80 points out of 100 in 2013, 2014 and 2015 respectively. Moreover, our state is performing better than average among its neighbors by parameters such as ‘Government Action’, ‘Citizens and Civil Rights’ and ‘Entrepreneurs and Business’. At the same time, the scores for both ‘Readiness’ and ‘Implementations’ have slightly declined from 2014, which leaves ‘Impact’ as the sole parameter on which Belgium has actually progressed (from 30 to 48). This is actually good news, since impact was Belgium’s weakest point – and still is. ‘Political Impact’ is the parameter by which Belgium is performing much weaker than the average in the region of Europe and Central Asia. It received ‘0’ for the question ‘To what extent has open data had a noticeable impact on increasing government efficiency and effectiveness?’ ODB_top_10 The neighborhood You might get jealous of France – and for a good reason. This country can provide you, not only cheese and wine, but a sheer amount of open data too, making it number 3 right next to the USA in the world ranking. Netherlands, on the contrary, lost one position in the ranking, descending to number 7. However, if you look at the top 10, you will find only 5 European countries up there. This might change even more: the new generation of open data adopters is going to challenge traditional stalwarts such as USA and UK. ‘The need to robust the data to drive democracy and development’  which is clear – is one of the key findings of the ODB. First world problems Now, you might call it a first world problem, but only being in the first quarter of the list can be not that great. What can Belgium do to not be stuck in the ranking, slowly backsliding while the other countries are catching up? The unique bilingual setting of Belgium and the subsequent division and subdivision of its authorities are among the main reasons that explain its low impact performance. Whereas in the developing countries, the whole issue of governments opening their data is revolutionary, developed countries seem to suffer from inconsistencies between the readiness of society for open data and its impact. This only proves the other key funding of the survey: the open data community needs to translate open data policy into real implementation. If we lose the moment, ‘open data could fade into a ghost town of abandoned pilots, outdated data portals and unused apps’. The release of data per se is only the beginning of the story, not its end. You need individuals, communities and companies who can use and reuse the open data for good, which does not exclude their businesses by the way. You need general public awareness of open data, the same way it is being informed about the importance of having fresh water and clean air. Open data has to stop being a geeky and nerdy term – it has to come to every house and make the difference on how you see the world. This is what they call impact.    

Belgium in the Open Data Barometer: Half way through

- April 22, 2016 in barometer, Featured, Open Data, Open Data News, ranking

Yesterday the World Wide Web Foundation has released the third edition of the Open Data Barometer. A collaborative research that covers 92 countries and ranks them by three key parameters: readiness (how prepared are governments regarding open data initiatives), implementation (are governments putting their commitments into practice) and impact (is open government data being used in ways that result in practical benefits). Let’s take a closer look on how Belgium did this year. ODB_Belgium So is The Glass Half Full or Half Empty? Belgium’s score is 52,62 out of 100 points which makes us half way through the open data barometer. Since the present edition is the third one, it allows us to search for trends in the country’s performance. For instance, whereas 2014 was sort of a breakthrough for many countries, with Belgium jumping from 34,8 points to 47,29, this year it is only 5,33 points higher. It is sharing the 22nd position with Iceland (as one year ago). This is still the growth, although a detailed look at the data gives some food for thought. Up is Down and Down is Up Throughout all the three years that this research is being carried out, Belgium has been doing steadily good in terms of readiness – 72, 86 an 80 points out of 100 in 2013, 2014 and 2015 respectively. Moreover, our state it is performing better than average among its neighbors by such parameters as ‘Government Action’, ‘Citizens and Civil Rights’ and ‘Entrepreneurs and Business’. At the same time, the scores for both ‘readiness’ and ‘implementations’ have slightly declined from 2014, which leaves the ‘impact’ the sole parameter on which Belgium has actually progressed (from 30 to 48). This is actually good news, since the impact was the Belgium’s weakest point – and still is. ‘Political Impact’ is the parameter by which Belgium is performing much weaker than the average in the region of Europe and Central Asia. It received ‘0’ for the question ‘To what extent has open data had a noticeable impact on increasing government efficiency and effectiveness?’ ODB_top_10 The Neighborhood You might get jealous towards France – and for a reason. This country can provide you not only cheese and wine, but sheer amount of open data, too, making it number 3 right next to the USA in the world ranking. Netherlands, on the contrary, lost one position in the ranking, descending to number 7. However, if you take the top 10, you will find only 5 European countries there. This might increase even more: the new generation of open data adopters is going to challenge traditional stalwarts such as USA and UK. ‘The need to robust the data to drive democracy and development’  which is clear – is one of the key findings of the ODB. First World Problems Now, you might call it the first world problem, but being in the first quarter of the list can be not that great. What can Belgium do not to be stuck in the ranking, slowly backsliding as long as the other countries are catching up? The unique bilingual setting of Belgium and the subsequent division and subdivision if its authorities are among the main reasons that explain its low impact performance. Whereas in the developing countries, the whole issue of governments opening their data is revolutionary, developed countries seem to suffer from inconsistencies between the readiness of society for the open data and its impact. This only proves the other key funding of the survey: open data community needs to translate open data policy into real implementation. If we lose the moment, ‘open data could fade into a ghost town of abandoned pilots, outdated data portals, and unused apps’. The release of the data per se is only the beginning of the story, not its end. You need individuals, communities and companies who can use and reuse the open data for good, which does not exclude their businesses, by the way. You need general public awareness of the open data, the same way it is being informed about the importance of having fresh water and clean air. Open data has to stop being a geek and nerdy term – it has to come to every house and make the difference on how you see the world. This is what they call impact.    

Brasil é o 38. país em ranking de Governo Aberto

- April 10, 2015 in governo aberto, ranking, transparência

O termo “governo aberto” tem ganhado expressão nos últimos anos. Ele sintetiza o direito que os cidadãos têm de acessar aos documentos do governo e permitir influenciar mais nas decisões da administração pública. As tecnologias de informação, sem dúvida, são grandes propulsores desse processo.

wjP-opengovMapa interativo com dados da pesquisa

Mas como medir se um governo é mais ou menos aberto aos seus cidadãos? O Word Justice Project (WJP) propôs o desafio de criar uma metodologia para medir isso. O Índice de Governo Aberto WJP apresenta pontuações e classificações com base em avaliações realizadas em quatro dimensões: publicidade de leis e dados governamentais, direito à informação, participação cívica e mecanismos de denúncia. A pontuação para o índice foi elaborada a partir de mais de 100.000 questionários aplicados em domicílios em grandes cidades de 102 países. O estudo também abarcou entrevistas com especialistas locais. Os países com melhor resultado foram – nesta ordem – Suécia, Nova Zelândia, Noruega, Dinamarca, Holanda e Finlândia. Os piores foram Myanmar, Uzbequistão e Zimbabwe. Os melhores desempenhos por região foram da Geórgia (Ásia, sendo o 29o. no global); África do Sul (27o no global); e Canadá (América, com 7a posição no global). O estudo apontou o Brasil na 38o colocação, ficando atrás de Chile, Costa Rica e Uruguai e empatado com Colômbia. Um mapa interativo oferece uma visualização interessante dos dados. O Brasil ficou em 4o. lugar entre os 19 países da América Latina e Caribe incluídos na pesquisa. O melhor desempenho do Brasil foi no item “participação cívica” (60 pontos de 100 possíveis) e a pior em publicidade de leis e dados governamentais (50 de 100). Para obter mais informações, consulte a página do projeto. A metodologia pode ser encontrada neste link. Autores do texto: *Jorge Machado é professor do curso de Gestão de Políticas Públicas da USP, um dos coordenadores do COLAB – Colaboratório de Desenvolvimento e Participação do COLAB/USP **Jutta Schmidt Machado é doutora em antropologia social pela Universidade de Colônia e faz pesquisas sobre dados abertos e desenvolvimento. flattr this!

Belgium scores slightly higher on the Global Open Data Index, big expectations for 2015

- December 9, 2014 in belgium, opendataindex, Press, ranking

According to the Global Open Data Index, Belgium ranks 53d out of 97 countries, going up from 27% to 39%. A status quo one might think, knowing that last year Belgium ranked 58th, but a lot has happened since. The Global Data Index, a tool developed by Open Knowledge, ranks 97 nations based on 10 key national datasets. The UK sits at the top with 96% opened up data on government spending, budget, postal codes and more. Belgium however remains in the middle of the list between Croatia and Costa Rica. Yet a lot has changed: KBO/BCE opened up their company register database as open data [1] earlier this year and Irceline launched the pollutant emissions website [2] opening up data on air quality. Detailed results can be found at http://index.okfn.org/place/belgium/. “If nothing happened regarding opening up Belgian data, we would have dropped to the 83rd place. Opening up data is a global phenomenon, it is not happening only in the Western countries”, says Pieter-Jan Pauwels, community coordinator at Open Knowledge Belgium. Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 15.38.12 That is something the new federal government realised, especially when neighbouring countries take on the 1st (UK), 3rd (France), 9th (Germany) and 16th place (Netherlands). In the new federal policy agreement, open data was mentioned several times and where once nobody was directly responsible we now have a minister responsible for the Digital Agenda. Minister Alexander De Croo announced last week at the Opening Up conference that this number is too low and will be higher next year. Together with organisations such as Leiedal and Open Knowledge Belgium, he signed the “Open by default” charter, where Belgium now promises to open up datasets if there are no good reasons not to. Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 15.36.26 The 23d of February Open Knowledge Belgium vzw/asbl will organise the Open Belgium conference in Namur with minister De Croo as one of the keynote speakers. During the conference we will discuss open data on different levels in Belgium as well as host hands-on sessions on e.g., open science, open tourism, open transport or open street map. The full programme is available at http://2015.openbelgium.be.