You are browsing the archive for retro-future.

1970: A Vision of the Coming Age (1870)

- June 14, 2018 in best of sci-fi and future visions, future history, future technologies, historical predictions of the future, quakerism, quakers, retro-future, retrofuture, retrofuturism, technology, utopia, utopias

A vision of the world hundred years in the future, in which societies have been transformed into Quakerly perfection.

1970: A Vision of the Coming Age (1870)

- June 14, 2018 in best of sci-fi and future visions, future history, future technologies, historical predictions of the future, quakerism, quakers, retro-future, retrofuture, retrofuturism, technology, utopia, utopias

A vision of the world hundred years in the future, in which societies have been transformed into Quakerly perfection.

1970: A Vision of the Coming Age (1870)

- June 14, 2018 in best of sci-fi and future visions, future history, future technologies, historical predictions of the future, quakerism, quakers, retro-future, retrofuture, retrofuturism, technology, utopia, utopias

A vision of the world hundred years in the future, in which societies have been transformed into Quakerly perfection.

The Telephonoscope (1879)

- November 10, 2015 in edison, future history, future technologies, futurism, futurology, George du Maurier, history of the future, punch, retro-future, retrofuture, victorian, Victorian Skype, Victorian technology

An 1879 depiction of an imagined communication device which, for all intents and purposes, amounts to some kind of Victorian Skype.

The Telephonoscope (1879)

- November 10, 2015 in edison, future history, future technologies, futurism, futurology, George du Maurier, historical predictions of the future, history of the future, punch, retro-future, retrofuture, steampunk, victorian, Victorian Skype, Victorian technology

Device imagined in a Punch cartoon from 1879, predicting the advent of video chat more than 100 years before Skype.

Leaving the Opera in the Year 2000

- June 4, 2014 in albert robida, future history, futurology, opera, paris, retro-future, retrofuturism

A 19th-century vision of leaving the opera in the year 2000 - a print created in 1882 by the French illustrator, caricaturist, novelist, and all around futurologist, Albert Robida.

Leaving the Opera in the Year 2000

- June 4, 2014 in albert robida, future history, futurology, opera, paris, retro-future, retrofuturism

A 19th-century vision of leaving the opera in the year 2000 - a print created in 1882 by the French illustrator, caricaturist, novelist, and all around futurologist, Albert Robida.

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893

- April 8, 2014 in fashion, future, retro-future, retrofu, victorian

Illustrations from a delightful piece called the Future Dictates of Fashion by W. Cade Gall and published in 1893 which tries to predict the next 100 years of fashion.

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893

- April 8, 2014 in fashion, future, retro-future, retrofu, victorian

Illustrations from a delightful piece called the Future Dictates of Fashion by W. Cade Gall and published in 1893 which tries to predict the next 100 years of fashion.

Design for Dreaming (1956)

- January 21, 2013 in 50s, advertisements, cars, collections, Films, Films: 1950s, Films: Fantasy, Films: Short, fridges, general motors, Populuxe, prelinger archives, retro-future, retrofuturism

Over the top 1950s “Populuxe” advertisement for General Motors, set at their 1956 Motors Motorama. A woman falls asleep and dreams of a glorious future of perfect products, including a variety of shiny futuristic dream cars and Frigidaire’s fully automated “Kitchen of the Future.” The star of the story is played by dancer and choreographer Tad Tadlock. The film has over the years become a popular symbol of 50s consumerist culture and was featured extensively in the BBC documentary series Pandora’s Box by Adam Curtis. Some footage was also used in the music video for Peter Gabriel’s 1987 single “In Your Eyes”, Rush’s 1989 music video for “Superconductor”, a 1989 commercial for the Nintendo Game Boy game Super Mario Land, and a 1994 commercial for Power Macintosh. Part of the film, with dialogue, is played during the opening titles for The Hills Have Eyes. Some snippets (without dialogue) are played in the video watched by Michael Douglas during his physical in The Game and in the opening titles for The Stepford Wives. (Wikipedia) The film is downloadable at the Internet Archive, and is part of the Prelinger Archive. Note this film is in the public domain in the US, but [...]