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Walt Whitman in Russia: Three Love Affairs

- May 29, 2019 in Featured Articles, Konstantin Balmont, Kornei Chukovsky, Literature, poetry, russia, translation, Vera Ermolaeva, walt whitman, walt whitman reception in russia

Walt Whitman’s influence on the creative output of 20th-century Russia — particularly in the years surrounding the 1917 Revolution — was enormous. For the 200th anniversary of Whitman's birth, Nina Murray looks at the translators through which Russians experienced his work, not only in a literary sense — through the efforts of Konstantin Balmont and Kornei Chukovsky — but also artistic, in the avant-garde printmaking of Vera Ermolaeva.

Walt Whitman in Russia: Three Love Affairs

- May 29, 2019 in Featured Articles, Konstantin Balmont, Kornei Chukovsky, Literature, poetry, russia, translation, Vera Ermolaeva, walt whitman, walt whitman reception in russia

Walt Whitman’s influence on the creative output of 20th-century Russia — particularly in the years surrounding the 1917 Revolution — was enormous. For the 200th anniversary of Whitman's birth, Nina Murray looks at the translators through which Russians experienced his work, not only in a literary sense — through the efforts of Konstantin Balmont and Kornei Chukovsky — but also artistic, in the avant-garde printmaking of Vera Ermolaeva.

Russian Portraits (1921)

- February 8, 2018 in art, communism, lenin, russia, soviet russia, travel, trotsly

Travel diary of the English sculptor Clare Sheridan telling the story of controversial trip to early Soviet Russia.

Russian Portraits (1921)

- February 8, 2018 in art, communism, lenin, russia, soviet russia, travel, trotsly

Travel diary of the English sculptor Clare Sheridan telling the story of controversial trip to early Soviet Russia.

Russian Portraits (1921)

- February 8, 2018 in art, communism, lenin, russia, soviet russia, travel, trotsly

Travel diary of the English sculptor Clare Sheridan telling the story of controversial trip to early Soviet Russia.

Kobayashi Kiyochika’s Cartoons of the Russo-Japanese War (1904–5)

- August 16, 2016 in cartoon, japan, Kobayashi Kiyochika, propaganda, russia, Russo-Japanese War, war

Propaganda cartoons from the pen of Japanese artist Kobayashi Kiyochika.

Kobayashi Kiyochika’s Cartoons of the Russo-Japanese War (1904–5)

- August 16, 2016 in cartoon, japan, Kobayashi Kiyochika, propaganda, russia, Russo-Japanese War, war

Propaganda cartoons from the pen of Japanese artist Kobayashi Kiyochika.

Kobayashi Kiyochika’s Cartoons of the Russo-Japanese War (1904–5)

- August 16, 2016 in cartoon, japan, Kobayashi Kiyochika, propaganda, russia, Russo-Japanese War, war

Propaganda cartoons from the pen of Japanese artist Kobayashi Kiyochika.

Data Roundup, 5 March

- March 5, 2014 in causes, Data Roundup, death, Europe, HDX, military, morph.io, newsvis, nicar, on-line, power, russia, shop, Trade, Ukraine, United Nations, US

Wally Gobetz – United Nations Headquarters

Tools, Events, Courses Not all the data you are looking for are already formatted and uploaded on the Internet. Sometimes you have to extract them from multiple websites, and then scraping is the only answer to the problem. Morph.io allows you to write your own scraper in Python, PHP, or Ruby. Give it a try! The NICAR 2014 conference ends today, but there is already a lot of material available online. Probably one of the best links is Chrys Wu’s list of slides, tutorials, and tools. Data Stories It is not a funny topic, but it surely stimulates curiosity, specifically that of the US citizens: take a look at Top Ten Causes of Death in the United States from Daily Infographic. Selling and buying online is becoming the rule, they say. The Wall Street Journal states the contrary with this little piece of data journalism which shows the dimension of the two sides of the markets in absolute terms as well as percentages. Maybe some of you have missed it, but you can still read Samuel Lee’s article on the World Bank Data Blog about the International Open Data Day in Washington D.C and the state of the art of the world of open data. Currently Ukraine is on the cover page of every newspaper worldwide. If you know to want more about the main differences between its defense sector and that of Russia, you should see this infographic showing the two countries’ military power. Moreover, you might also be interested in knowing more about the economic relations that Russia and the European countries maintain. On the BBC News website, you can find Russia’s trade ties with Europe; go and read it. Data Sources Thanks to the HDX platform developed by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, it is now possible to collect, share, and download data related to humanitarian crises in a much easier and faster way. The big data job market is expanding, and so is the need for frequently updated job boards. Here you can find that of Source, which regularly publishes “job listings for people who design interactive features, write code, and sling data in newsrooms”. This week we recommend that data lovers, information designers, and journalists take a look at newsvis.org, a well organized and useful collection of data visualizations of all kind from around the web. Credits Thanks to @SchoolOfData and @OpenDevToolkit flattr this!

Russian Fairytales (1915)

- October 2, 2012 in collections, fairytales, folktales, russia, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Fairytales

Russian fairy tales from the Russian of Polevoi, by R. Nisbet Bain, illustrated by Noel L. Nisbet; 1915; Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. A collection of Russian fairytales translated from the Russian of Nikolai Polevoy, a notable editor, writer, translator in the early 19th century. The translations were made by Robert Nisbet Bain, a British historian who worked for the British Museum, and a polyglot who could reportedly speak over twenty languages fluently. He famously taught himself Hungarian in order that he could read the works of Mór Jókai in the original after first reading him in German, going on to become the most prolific translator into English from Hungarian in the nineteenth century. The book is housed at the Internet Archive, donated by the Boston Public Library. Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!