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Introducing the 2018 Class of School of Data Fellows!

- June 27, 2018 in School of Data, School of Data Fellows

This blog has been reposted from the School of Data blog. School of Data is delighted to announce its sixth class of fellows. From June until January 2019, the programme will allow fellows to deepen their data literacy skills and work alongside local partner organisations to enhance the data literacy network local to them. We were really pleased to receive a large number of applications and would like to both congratulate and wish all our new fellows the very best for their fellowship! Pamela Gonzales is passionate about data visualization and bridging the digital divide for women. She is the co-founder of Bolivia Tech Hub, a collaborative space for tech projects to contribute to the prosperity of an innovative ecosystem in Bolivia. Pamela is also the Regional Ambassador for Technovation, a San Francisco based program that equips girls with the skills needed to solve real-world problems through technology. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from Universidad Mayor de San Andres.         Odanga Madung is the co-founder and Data Science Lead at Odipo Dev, a data science and analytics firm operating out of Nairobi Kenya that delivers services to various bluechip companies and NGOs across the country. Odanga’s deepest interest is at the intersection between data and culture and it is through this that Odipo Dev has been able to carry out data analysis and visualisation on various activities for a wide range of clients and occurrences in Kenya and the world.Some of his work has been featured in publications such as Adweek, Yahoo, BBC, CNBC, Quartz, and Daily Nation, just to mention a few. He will be working on Open Contracting in Kenya during the period of his fellowship. You can follow him on Twitter @Odangaring and Odipo Dev @OdipoDev for more information.   Nzumi Malendeja is a Research Associate at an Independent Evaluation and Research Cell of BRAC International in Tanzania, where he leads larger-scale research projects in education, agriculture, and health. Here, he has developed mobile-based data collection platforms (ODK Collect and SurveyCTO), which replaced the traditional paper-based methods. Before this, Mr. Nzumi worked as a Field Monitor and Research Assistant at SoChaGlobal and Maarifa ni Ufunguo respectively, both in education and construction sector transparency projects. Mr. Nzumi has attended a 4 week Summer School Training on Research Methods and Teaching Skills, hosted by Hamburg University of Applied Sciences in Germany, funded by the Germany Academic Exchange Services (DAAD). Presently, Mr. Nzumi is working on his thesis towards the fulfillment of the Master of Research and Public Policy at the University of Dar es Salaam.   Sofia Montenegro A fan of nature and the teachings it hides, Sofia has dedicated herself to research in the social sciences. She studied Political Science at the Universidad Francisco Marroquin and Public Opinion and Political Behavior through a Masters degree at the University of Essex, where she deepened her interest in data methodologies in social research. Sofia is interested in academia only as long as it drives political action. She looks to help other women to be involved freely in data practice and political spaces. Sofia is also interested in network analysis, studying corruption as a social phenomenon, following electoral processes and learning research methods.   Elias Mwakilama is a lecturer at University of Malawi-Chancellor College and Coordinator of Research, Seminar and Consultancies, and Diploma in Statistics programme in the Mathematical Sciences Department, Elias Mwakilama is a computational and applied mathematician in the field of operations research. He lectures and supervises undergraduate students in Mathematics & Statistics fields. His research interests are in working with optimisation models using mathematical statistics techniques integrated with computing skills to offer solutions of industrial related problems in theoretical and practical arena. Elias holds a first upper class MSc degree in Mathematical Sciences from University of Malawi. His website is here. During his fellowship, he hopes to support the “public procurement open contract platform” for Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) in Malawi with Hivos.   Ben Hur Pintor is an open-source and open-data advocate from the Philippines​ who believes in democratising not only data, but ​also ​the means of utilising and analysing data.​ He’s a geospatial generalist and software developer who’s​ worked on projects related to renewable energy, blue carbon ecosystems, and participatory disaster risk mapping and assessment. ​Ben is currently pursuing an MS Geomatics Engineering degree at the University of the Philippines. As part of his advocacy for Free and Open Source Software (FOSS), he’s a co-organiser and active participant of FOSS4G Philippines and MaptimeDiliman — avenues for sharing open​ ​source mapping technologies with the community.   Hani Rosidaini is passionate about how technology can be adopted and applied for people’s needs. She combines her technical skills, especially in information systems and data science, with social and business knowledge, to help companies and organisations in Indonesia, Australia, and Japan. This includes her own ventures. Highly relevant to this year fellowship’s focus of data procurement, Hani has experience as a data specialist for public policy in the Indonesia Presidential Office, where she has analysed the national integrated data platform, data.go.id, contributed to data-driven policy making, advocated ministries and agencies, as well as engaged with civic and local communities.

Introducing the 2018 Class of School of Data Fellows!

- June 27, 2018 in School of Data, School of Data Fellows

This blog has been reposted from the School of Data blog. School of Data is delighted to announce its sixth class of fellows. From June until January 2019, the programme will allow fellows to deepen their data literacy skills and work alongside local partner organisations to enhance the data literacy network local to them. We were really pleased to receive a large number of applications and would like to both congratulate and wish all our new fellows the very best for their fellowship! Pamela Gonzales is passionate about data visualization and bridging the digital divide for women. She is the co-founder of Bolivia Tech Hub, a collaborative space for tech projects to contribute to the prosperity of an innovative ecosystem in Bolivia. Pamela is also the Regional Ambassador for Technovation, a San Francisco based program that equips girls with the skills needed to solve real-world problems through technology. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from Universidad Mayor de San Andres.         Odanga Madung is the co-founder and Data Science Lead at Odipo Dev, a data science and analytics firm operating out of Nairobi Kenya that delivers services to various bluechip companies and NGOs across the country. Odanga’s deepest interest is at the intersection between data and culture and it is through this that Odipo Dev has been able to carry out data analysis and visualisation on various activities for a wide range of clients and occurrences in Kenya and the world.Some of his work has been featured in publications such as Adweek, Yahoo, BBC, CNBC, Quartz, and Daily Nation, just to mention a few. He will be working on Open Contracting in Kenya during the period of his fellowship. You can follow him on Twitter @Odangaring and Odipo Dev @OdipoDev for more information.   Nzumi Malendeja is a Research Associate at an Independent Evaluation and Research Cell of BRAC International in Tanzania, where he leads larger-scale research projects in education, agriculture, and health. Here, he has developed mobile-based data collection platforms (ODK Collect and SurveyCTO), which replaced the traditional paper-based methods. Before this, Mr. Nzumi worked as a Field Monitor and Research Assistant at SoChaGlobal and Maarifa ni Ufunguo respectively, both in education and construction sector transparency projects. Mr. Nzumi has attended a 4 week Summer School Training on Research Methods and Teaching Skills, hosted by Hamburg University of Applied Sciences in Germany, funded by the Germany Academic Exchange Services (DAAD). Presently, Mr. Nzumi is working on his thesis towards the fulfillment of the Master of Research and Public Policy at the University of Dar es Salaam.   Sofia Montenegro A fan of nature and the teachings it hides, Sofia has dedicated herself to research in the social sciences. She studied Political Science at the Universidad Francisco Marroquin and Public Opinion and Political Behavior through a Masters degree at the University of Essex, where she deepened her interest in data methodologies in social research. Sofia is interested in academia only as long as it drives political action. She looks to help other women to be involved freely in data practice and political spaces. Sofia is also interested in network analysis, studying corruption as a social phenomenon, following electoral processes and learning research methods.   Elias Mwakilama is a lecturer at University of Malawi-Chancellor College and Coordinator of Research, Seminar and Consultancies, and Diploma in Statistics programme in the Mathematical Sciences Department, Elias Mwakilama is a computational and applied mathematician in the field of operations research. He lectures and supervises undergraduate students in Mathematics & Statistics fields. His research interests are in working with optimisation models using mathematical statistics techniques integrated with computing skills to offer solutions of industrial related problems in theoretical and practical arena. Elias holds a first upper class MSc degree in Mathematical Sciences from University of Malawi. His website is here. During his fellowship, he hopes to support the “public procurement open contract platform” for Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) in Malawi with Hivos.   Ben Hur Pintor is an open-source and open-data advocate from the Philippines​ who believes in democratising not only data, but ​also ​the means of utilising and analysing data.​ He’s a geospatial generalist and software developer who’s​ worked on projects related to renewable energy, blue carbon ecosystems, and participatory disaster risk mapping and assessment. ​Ben is currently pursuing an MS Geomatics Engineering degree at the University of the Philippines. As part of his advocacy for Free and Open Source Software (FOSS), he’s a co-organiser and active participant of FOSS4G Philippines and MaptimeDiliman — avenues for sharing open​ ​source mapping technologies with the community.   Hani Rosidaini is passionate about how technology can be adopted and applied for people’s needs. She combines her technical skills, especially in information systems and data science, with social and business knowledge, to help companies and organisations in Indonesia, Australia, and Japan. This includes her own ventures. Highly relevant to this year fellowship’s focus of data procurement, Hani has experience as a data specialist for public policy in the Indonesia Presidential Office, where she has analysed the national integrated data platform, data.go.id, contributed to data-driven policy making, advocated ministries and agencies, as well as engaged with civic and local communities.

Apply Now! School of Data’s 2018 Fellowship Programme

- April 17, 2018 in data literacy, School of Data, School of Data Fellows, training

This blog has been reposted from the School of Data blog School of Data is inviting journalists, data scientists, civil society advocates and anyone interested in advancing data literacy to apply for its 2018 Fellowship Programme, which will run from May 2018 to January 2019. 8 positions are open, 1 in each of the following countries: Bolivia, Guatemala, Ghana, Indonesia, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, The Philippines. The application deadline is set on Sunday, May 6th of 2018. If you would like to sponsor a fellowship, please get in touch with School of Data. Apply for the Fellowship Programme

The Fellowship

School of Data works to empower civil society organisations, journalists and citizens with the skills they need to use data effectively in their efforts to create more equitable and effective societies. Fellowships are nine-month placements with School of Data for data-literacy practitioners or enthusiasts. During this time, Fellows work alongside School of Data to build an individual programme that will make use of both the collective experience of School of Data’s network to help Fellows gain new skills, and the knowledge that Fellows bring along with them, be it about a topic, a community or specific data literacy challenges. Similarly to previous years, our aim with the Fellowship programme is to increase awareness of data literacy and build communities who together, can use data literacy skills to make the change they want to see in the world. The 2018 Fellowship will continue the work in the thematic approach pioneered by the 2016 class. As a result, we will be prioritising candidates who:
  • possess experience in, and enthusiasm for, a specific area of data literacy training
  • can demonstrate links with an organisation practising in this defined area and/or links with an established network operating in the field
We are looking for engaged individuals who already have in-depth knowledge of a given sector or specific skillsets that can be applied to this year’s focus topics.. This will help Fellows get off to a running start and achieve the most during their time with School of Data: nine months fly by! Read More about the Fellowship Programme

The areas of focus in 2018

We have partnered with Hivos and NRGI to work on the following themes: Procurement and data in the extractives industry (oil, mining, gas). These amazing partner organisations will provide Fellows with guidance, mentorship and expertise in their respective domains.

2018 Fellowship Positions

Bolivia The Fellowship in Bolivia will be focused on public procurement data through the Open Contracting Programme. For this position, School of Data is looking for someone with: Experience with and interest in community building, experience with the implementation of civic projects with a data or technical component, storytelling skills, and experience with promoting data or technical stories to a wide audience, basic understanding of the public procurement process Guatemala The Fellowship in Guatemala will be focused on public procurement data through the Open Contracting Programme. For this position, School of Data is looking for someone with: Experience in the planning, coordination and implementation of projects with civil society organisations, the ability to advise and train organisations on working with data and delivering technical projects, basic understanding of the public procurement process Ghana The Fellowship in Ghana with be focused on extractives Data through the Media Development Programme at NRGI. For this position, School of Data is looking for someone with: an interest in supporting or working within the civil society sector, experience working with financial (or related) data for analysis experience as a trainer and/or community builder, interest and/or experience in the extractives sector, demonstrated skills as a data storyteller or journalist Malawi The Fellowship in Malawi will be focused on public procurement data through the Open Contracting Programme. For this position, School of Data is looking for someone with: experience with delivering technical and data-driven projects, experience with facilitating training activities, experience with data collection projects, basic understanding of the public procurement process Indonesia The Fellowship in Indonesia will be focused on public procurement data through the Open Contracting Programme. For this position, School of Data is looking for someone with: experience with delivering technical and data-driven projects, experience with facilitating training activities, experience with working with government systems or data. Candidates with the following optional interests and experience will be appreciated: experience with explaining complex topics to varied audiences, experience with user design methodologies, experience with community development The Philippines The Fellowship in The Philippines will be focused on public procurement data through the Open Contracting Programme. For this position, School of Data is looking for someone with: experience with user-centric research and design methodologies, experience with community-building activities, experience with data storytelling. Candidates with the following optional interests and experience will be appreciated: graphic design skills, experience with delivering trainings Kenya The Fellowship in Kenya will be focused on public procurement data through the Open Contracting Programme. For this position, School of Data is looking for someone with: experience with delivering data-driven projects, experience with user research and data storytelling, experience with explaining complex topics to varied audiences. Candidates with the following optional interests and experience will be appreciated: interest in or experience with supporting civic projects and civil society organisations, experience with facilitating training activities. Tanzania The Fellowship in Tanzania will be focused on public procurement data through the Open Contracting Programme. For this position, School of Data is looking for someone with: experience with delivering data-driven projects, experience with facilitating training activities, experience with explaining complex topics to varied audiences. Candidates with the following optional interests and experience will be appreciated: experience working with journalists or as a journalist, interest in or experience with supporting civic projects and civil society organisations, experience with writing pedagogical content

9 months to make an impact

The programme will run from May to January 2019, and entail up to 10 days a month of time. Fellows will receive a monthly stipend of $1,000 USD a month to cover for their work. What are you waiting for? Read more about School of Data’s Fellowship or Apply now

Key Information: Fellowship

  • Available positions: up to 8 fellows, 1 in each of the following countries: Bolivia, Guatemala, Ghana, Indonesia, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, The Philippines
  • Application deadline: May 6th, 2018, midnight GMT+0
  • Duration: From May 14th, 2018 to January 31st, 2019
  • Level of activity: 10 days per month
  • Stipend: $1000 USD per month

Key links

About diversity and inclusivity

School of Data is committed to being inclusive in its recruitment practices. Inclusiveness means excluding no one because of race, age, religion, cultural appearance, sexual orientation, ethnicity or gender. We proactively seek to recruit individuals who differ from one another in these characteristics, in the belief that diversity enriches all that we do.

Αξιολόγηση 1ου Σχολείου Δεδομένων

- December 1, 2017 in Featured, Featured @en, News, School of Data, ανοικτά δεδομένα, Νέα, συμμετοχικός προϋπολογισμός, σχολείο δεδομένων

Θετική και με ενδιαφέροντα ευρήματα είναι η γενική αξιολόγηση του 1ου Σχολείου Δεδομένων στην Περιφέρεια Δυτικής Μακεδονίας για στελέχη της ηλεκτρονικής διακυβέρνησης των ΟΤΑ, όπως διαπιστώνεται από τις απαντήσεις των συμμετεχόντων σε σχετικό ερωτηματολόγιο. Ειδικότερα: Μόλις το ¼ των συμμετεχόντων είχε γνώση του νόμου Ν.4305/2014 σχετικά με τα ανοικτά δεδομένα, ως εκ τούτου, η πλειοψηφία των […]

Open Data Day 2016 Malaysia Data Expedition – Measuring Provision of Public Services for Education

- March 28, 2016 in data expedition, Open Data Day, School of Data

International Open Data DayThis blog post was written by the members of the Sinar project in Malaysia  In Malaysia, Sinar Project with the support of Open Knowledge International organised a one-day data expedition based on the guide from School of Data to search for data related to government provision of health and education services. This brought together a group of people with diverse skills to formulate questions of public interest. The data sourced would be used for analysis and visualisation in order to provide answers.

Data Expedition

School of Data D&D Character Sheet GiraffeA data expedition is a quest to explore uncharted areas of data and report on those findings. The participants with different skillsets gathered throughout the day at the Sinar Project office. Together they explored data relating to schools and clinics to see what data and analysis methods are available to gain insights on the public service provision for education and health. We used the guides and outlines for the data expedition from School of Data website. The role playing guides worked as a great ice breaker. There was healthy competition on who could draw the best giraffes for those wanting to prove their mettle as a designer for the team.    

Deciding what to explore, education or health?

The storyteller in the team, who was a professional journalist started out with a few questions to explore.
  • Are there villages or towns which are far away from schools?
  • Are there villages or towns which are far away from clinics and hospitals?
  • What is the population density and provision of clinics and schools?
The scouts then went on a preliminary exploration for whether this data exists.

Looking for the Lost City of Open Data

The Scouts, with the aid of the rest of the team, looked for data that could answer the questions. They found a lot of usable data from the Malaysian government open data portal data.gov.my. This data included lists of all public schools and clinics with addresses, as well as numbers of teachers for each district. It was decided by the team that given the time limitation, the focus would be to answer the questions on education data. Another priority was to find data relating to class sizes to see if schools are overcrowded or not. Below you can see the data that the team found.  School of Data D&D Character Sheet 2

Education

Open Data

Data in Reports

 

Definitions

Not all schools are created equal, there are different types, some are considered as high achieving schools or Sekolah Berprestasi Tinggi

Health

Open Data

GIS

 

Other Data

CIDB Construction Projects contains relevant information such as construction of schools and clinics Script to import into Elastic Search

Budgets

Sinar Project had some budgets as open data, at state and federal levels that could be used as additional reference point. These were created as part of the Open Spending project.

Selangor State Government

http://data.sinarproject.org/dataset/selangor-state-government-2015-budget

Federal Government

Higher education
Education

Participants

Methodology

The team opted to focus on the available datasets to answer questions about education provision, by first converting all school addresses into geocoding, and then looking at joining up data to find out the relationship between enrollments, school and teacher ratios.

Joining up data

To join up data; the different data sets such as teacher numbers and schools, VLOOKUP function in Excel was used to join by School code.

Converting Address to geolocation (latlong)

To convert street addresses to latitude, longitude coordinates we used the dataset with the cleansed address’ along with a geocoding tool csvgeocode ./node_modules/.bin/csvgeocode ./input.csv ./output.csv --url "https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/geocode/json?address={{Alamat}}&key=" --verbose

Convert the completed CSV to GeoJSON points

Use the  csv2geojson <span style="font-weight: 400;">csv2geojson --lat "Lat" --lon "Lng" Selangor_Joined_Up_Moe.csv</span>

To get population by PBT

Use the data from state economic planning unit agency site for socio-economic data specifically section Jadual 8

To get all the schools separated by individual PBT (District)

UseGeoJSON of Schools data and PBT Boundary loaded into QGIS; and use the Vector > Geo-processing > Intersect.   A post from Stack Exchange suggests  it might be better to use Vector > Spatial Query > Spatial Query option.

Open Datasets Generated

The cleansed and joined up datasets created during this expedition are made available on GitHub. While the focus was on education, due to the similarity in available data, the methods were also applied to clinics also. See it on our repository – https://github.com/Sinar/SinarODD2016

Visualizations

All Primary and Secondary Schools on a Map with Google Fusion Tables

All Primary and Secondary Schools on a Map with Google Fusion Tables https://www.google.com/fusiontables/DataSource?docid=1lVyjIIEm_McqmiSEfQY5vecrhqRjmaJ1wzdiEo1q#map:id=7

Teacher to Students per school ratios

Teacher to Students per school ratios https://www.google.com/fusiontables/DataSource?docid=18ieB8OqzpK3Ch9KcD4BiiADdmk8SXnS0x_IINxHc#map:id=3  

Discovery

  • Teachers vs enrollment did not provide data relating to class size or overcrowding
  • Demographic datasets to measure schools to eligible population
  • More school datasets required for teachers, specifically by subject and class ratios
  • Methods used for location of schools can also be applied to clinics & hospital data
It was discovered that additional data was needed to provide useful information on the quality of education. There was not enough demographic data found to check against the number of schools in a particular district. Teacher to student ratio was also not a good indicator of problems reported in the news. The teacher to enrollment ratios was generally very low with a mean of 13 and median of 14. What was needed, was ratio by subject teachers, class size or against the population of eligible children of each area, to provide better insights. Automatically calculating the distance from points was also considered and matched up with whether there are school bus operators in the area. This was discussed because the distance from schools may not be relevant for rural areas, where there were not enough children to warrant a school within the distance policy. A tool to check distance from a point to the nearest school could be built with the data made available. This could be useful for civil society to use data as evidence to prove that distance was too far or transport not provided for some communities. Demographic data was found for local councils; this could be used by researchers using local council boundary data on whether there were enough schools against the population of local councils. Interestingly in Malaysia, education is under Federal government and despite having state and local education departments, the administrative boundaries do not match up with local council boundaries or electoral boundaries. This is a planning coordination challenge for policy makers. Administrative local council boundary data was made available as open data thanks to the efforts of another civil society group Tindak Malaysia, which scanned and digitized the electoral and administrative boundaries manually.

Running future expeditions

This was a one day expedition so it was time limited. For running these brief expeditions we learned the following:
  • Focus and narrow down expedition to specific issue
  • Be better prepared, scout for available datasets beforehand and determine topic
  • Focus on central repository or wiki of available data
Thank you to all of the wonderful contributors to the data expedition:
  • Lim Hui Ying (Storyteller)
  • Haris Subandie (Engineer)
  • Jack Khor (Designer)
  • Chow Chee Leong (Analyst)
  • Donaldson Tan (Engineer)
  • Michael Leow (Engineer)
  • Sze Ming (Designer)
  • Swee Meng (Engineer)
  • Hazwany (Nany) Jamaluddin (Analyst)
  • Loo (Scout)

Data in December: Sharing Data Journalism Love in Tunisia

- January 11, 2016 in Big Data, Data Blog, Data Expeditions, Data for CSOs, Data Journalism, data science, data visualization, Open Data, School of Data, Tunisia

NRGI hosted the event #DataMuseTunisia in collaboration with Data Aurora and School of Data senior fellow Ali Rebaie on the 11th of December 2015 in beautiful Tunis where a group of CSO’s from different NGOs met in the Burge Du Lac Hotel to learn how to craft their datasets and share their stories through creative visuals. Bahia Halawi, one of the leading women data journalism practitioners in the MENA region and the co-founder at Data Aurora, led this workshop for 3 days. This event featured a group of professionals from different CSO’s. NRGI has been working closely with School of Data for the sake of driving economic development & transparency through data in the extractive industry. Earlier this year NRGI did similar events in Washington, Istanbul, United Kingdom, GhanaTanzania, Uganda and many others. The experience was very unique and the participants were very excited to use the open source tools and follow the data pipeline to end up with interactive stories. The first day started with an introduction to the world of data driven journalism and storytelling. Later on, participants checked out some of the most interesting stories worldwide before working with different layers of the data pipeline. The technical part challenged the participants to search for data related to their work and then scraping it using google spreadsheets, web extensions and scrapers to automate the data extraction phase. After that, each of the participants used google refine to filter and clean the data sets and  then remove redundancies ending up with useable data formats. The datasets were varied and some of them were placed on interactive maps through CartoDB while some of the participants used datawrapper to interactively visualize them in charts. The workshop also exposed participants to Tabula, empowering them with the ability of transforming documents from pdfs to excel. Delegates also discussed some of the challenges each of them faces at different locations in Tunisia. It was very interesting to see 12321620_1673319796270332_5440100026922548095_nparticipants share their ideas on how to approach different datasets and how to feed this into an official open data portal that can carry all these datasets together. One of the participants, Aymen Latrach, discussed the problems his team faces when it comes to data transparency about extractives in Tataouine. Other CSO’s like Manel Ben Achour who is a Project Coordinator at I WATCH Organization came already from a technical backgrounds and they were very happy to make use of new tools and techniques while working with their data. Most of the delegates didn’t come from technical backgrounds however and this was the real challenge. Some of the tools, even when they do not require any coding, mandate the knowledge about some technical terms or ideas. Thus, each phase in the data pipeline started with a theoretical explanatory session to familiarize delegates with the technical concepts that are to be covered. After that, Bahia had to demonstrate the steps and go around the delegates facing any problems to assist them in keeping up with the rest of the group. It was a little bit messy at the beginning but soon the participants got used to it and started trying out the tools on their own. In reality, trial and error is very crucial to developing the data journalism skills. These skills can never be attained without practice. 11232984_1673319209603724_5889072769128707064_n Another important finding, according to Bahia who discussed the importance of the learnt skills to the delegate’s community and workplace, is that each of them had his/her own vision about its use. The fact that the CSO’s had a very good work experience allowed them to have unique visions about the deployment of what they have learnt at their workplaces. This, along with the strong belief in the change open data portals can drive in their country are the only triggers to learning more tools and skills and bringing out better visualizations and stories that impact people around. The data journalism community 3 years ago was still at a very embryonic stage with few practitioners and data initiatives taking place in Africa and Asia. Today, with enthusiastic practitioners like Bahia Halawi and Ali Rebaie, and a community like School of Data spreading the love of data and the spirit of change it can make, the data journalism field has very promising expectations. The need for more initiatives and meet ups to develop the skills of CSOs in the extractive industries as well as other fields remains a priority for reaching out for true transparency in every single domain.  Thank you, You can connect with Bahia on Twitter @HalawiBahia. Flattr this!

Join the School of Data team: Technical Trainer wantd

- November 9, 2015 in Featured, Jobs, School of Data

Background

The mission of Open Knowledge International is to open up all essential public interest information and see it utilized to create insight that drives change. To this end we work to create a global movement for open knowledge, supporting a network of leaders and local groups around the world; we facilitate coordination and knowledge sharing within the movement; we build collaboration with other change-making organisations both within our space and outside; and, finally, we prototype and provide a home for pioneering products. A decade after its foundation, Open Knowledge International is ready for its next phase of development. We started as an organisation that led the quest for the opening up of existing data sets – and in today’s world most of the big data portals run on CKAN, an open source software product developed first by us. Today, it is not only about opening up of data; it is making sure that this data is usable, useful and – most importantly – used, to improve people’s lives. Our current projects (School of Data, OpenSpending, OpenTrials, and many more) all aim towards giving people access to data, the knowledge to understand it, and the power to use it in our everyday lives. The School of Data is growing in size and scope, and to support this project – alongside our partners – we are looking for an enthusiastic Technical Trainer (flexible location, part time). School of Data is a network of data literacy practitioners, both organisations and individuals, implementing training and other data literacy activities in their respective countries and regions. Members of the School of Data work to empower civil society organizations (CSOs), journalists, governments and citizens with the skills they need to use data effectively in their efforts to create better, more equitable and more sustainable societies. Over the past four years, School of Data has succeeded in developing and sustaining a thriving and active network of data literacy practitioners in partnership with our implementing partners across Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa. Our local implementing partners are Social TIC, Code for Africa, Metamorphosis, and several Open Knowledge chapters around the world. Together, we have produced dozens of lessons and hands-on tutorials on how to work with data published online, benefitting thousands of people around the world. Over 4500 people have attended our tailored training events, and our network has mentored dozens of organisations to become tech savvy and data driven. Our methodologies and approach for delivering hands-on data training and data literacy skills – such as the data expedition – have now been replicated in various formats by organisations around the world. One of our flagship initiatives, the School of Data Fellowship Programme, was first piloted in 2013 and has now successfully supported 26 fellows in 25 countries to provide long-term data support to CSOs in their communities. School of Data coordination team members are also consistently invited to give support locally to fellows in their projects and organisations that want to become more data-savvy. In order to give fellows a solid point of reference in terms of content development and training resources, and also to have a point person to give capacity building support for our members and partners around the world, School of Data is now hiring an outstanding trainer/consultant who’s familiar with all the steps of the Data Pipeline and School of Data’s innovative training methodology to be the all-things-content-and-training for the School of Data network.

Objectives

The hired professional will have three main objectives:
  • Technical Trainer & Data Wrangler: represent School of Data in training activities around the world, either supporting local members through our Training Dispatch or delivering the training themselves;
  • Data Pipeline & Training Consultant: give support for members and fellows regarding training (planning, agenda, content) and curriculum development using School of Data’s Data Pipeline;
  • Curriculum development: work closely with the Programme Manager & Coordination team to steer School of Data’s curriculum development, updating and refreshing our resources as novel techniques and tools arise.

Terms of Reference

  • Attend regular (weekly) planning calls with School of Data Coordination Team;
  • Work with current and future School of Data funders and partners in data-literacy related activities in an assortment of areas: Extractive Industries, Natural Disaster, Health, Transportation, Elections, etc;
  • Be available to organise and run in person data-literacy training events around the world, sometimes in short notice (agenda, content planning, identifying data sources, etc);
  • Provide reports of training events and support given to members and partners of School of Data Network;
  • Work closely with all School of Data Fellows around the world to aid them in their content development and training events planning & delivery;
  • Write for the School of Data blog about curriculum and training events;
  • Take ownership of the development of curriculum for School of Data and support training events of the School of Data network;
  • Work with Fellows and other School of Data Members to design and develop their skillshare curriculum;
  • Coordinate support for the Fellows when they do their trainings;
  • Mentor Fellows including monthly point person calls, providing feedback on blog posts and curriculum & general troubleshooting;
  • The position reports to School of Data’s Programme Manager and will work closely with other members of the project delivery team;
  • This part-time role is paid by the hour. You will be compensated with a market salary, in line with the parameters of a non-profit-organisation;
  • We offer employment contracts for residents of the UK with valid permits, and services contracts to overseas residents

Deliverables

  • A lightweight monthly report of performed activities with Fellows and members of the network;
  • A final narrative report at the end of the first period (6 months) summarising performed activities;
  • Map the current School of Data curriculum to diagnose potential areas of improvement and to update;
  • Plan and suggest a curriculum development & training delivery toolkit for Fellows and members of the network

Requirements

  • Be self-motivated and autonomous;
  • Fluency in written and spoken English (Spanish & French are a plus);
  • Reliable internet connection;
  • Outstanding presentation and communication skills;
  • Proven experience running and planning training events;
  • Proven experience developing curriculum around data-related topics;
  • Experience working remotely with workmates in multiple timezones is a plus;
  • Experience in project management;
  • Major in Journalism, Computer Science, or related field is a plus
We strive for diversity in our team and encourage applicants from the Global South and from minorities.

Duration

Six months to one year: from November 2015 (as soon as possible) to April 2016, with the possibility to extend until October 2016 and beyond, at 10-12 days per month (8 hours/day).

Application Process

Interested? Then send us a motivational letter and a one page CV via https://okfn.org/about/jobs/. Please indicate your current country of residence, as well as your salary expectations (in GBP) and your earliest availability. Early application is encouraged, as we are looking to fill the positions as soon as possible. These vacancies will close when we find a suitable candidate. Interviews will be conducted on a rolling basis and may be requested on short notice. If you have any questions, please direct them to jobs [at] okfn.org.

In memory of Michael Bauer

- September 27, 2015 in Data Diva, Featured, Mchal, Memories, Open Knowledge, School of Data

Reblogged from School of Data Blog, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike v3.0 License   “It was with great sadness that we learned last week that we had lost one of our greats. Michael Bauer passed away suddenly on 13th September 2015 while running the Wachau half marathon. In this post, the School of Data team (both past and present) remember what he gave to the project, and our favourite moments from working with him.” Michael joined School of Data as one of the first team members in 2012 and worked on the project up until October 2014. In this time, he trained and helped hundreds of activists from across the world and built an amazing community of likeminded people – a community which is now thriving, in large part due to the contributions and skills that Michael gave. His extraordinary intelligence and skills gave School of Data an “edge”; for him, anything done on the project had to be both educational and fun, else there was no point in doing it. He taught all of us personally a huge amount about what it means to be a ‘data trainer’. He was a great colleague, and an even better friend. The School of Data team is largely remote – we work from wherever we like and connect with each other online. This means we don’t see each other so often and most of our contact is done via emails, online meetings or, as usually was the case with Michael, Skype chats from airport lounges…
Playing ‘Where is Michael?’ was always a fun game.

Playing ‘Where is Michael?’ was always a fun game.

It also means that when we do meet in person, the time is precious. We travelled together across the world – and wow, did Michael travel. He was always up for spontaneous trips (sometimes with as little as twelve hours notice before intercontinental travel), for throwing himself into getting to know new communities, to spend nights dancing even with early starts due the next day. Colourful both in personality and turnout, we will always remember Michael in his shiny cape at Mozfest when we ran our first ever data expedition – our Data Diva. 8173097617_5ebd4a94b2_zPeople genuinely never forgot Michael – he was charismatic and commanded people’s attention. He managed to understand data and people, and he could inspire every single person he met, no matter how many were in the workshop. He was a true polymath, too – he went from medical doctor, to academic, to data trainer/coder, to a journalist – and all before the age of 35. To us, Michael was intelligent, always ready to help people, honest (sometimes painfully), funny and, as all the best people are, wonderfully awkward. Most of all, he was generous with his time, humble, and thoughtful. He managed to foster an environment where anyone could ask him a question, or for help on building something – and he would answer without any fuss, and with contagious enthusiasm. 8683527172_2ea6930fdf_o (1)As a key architect of many of School of Data’s workshop styles, particularly Data Clinics and Data Expeditions, his legacy lives on through the character sheets he made just 10 minutes before the first expedition started, and in many of the materials the community use today 8173129738_06a92976cb_m 8173096061_83bd95bac8_mWhen he moved on to derStandard.at, we were torn between happiness for him – that he was starting a new stage in his life – and sadness, that he was leaving our team. He was so excited about it though: finally, he would “stop talking about data journalism and start doing it.” As a leaving gift, we made him this video to show him how much we appreciated him. Watch it from YouTube.

In memory of Michael Bauer

- September 27, 2015 in Data Diva, Featured, Mchal, Memories, Open Knowledge, School of Data

Reblogged from School of Data Blog, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike v3.0 License   “It was with great sadness that we learned last week that we had lost one of our greats. Michael Bauer passed away suddenly on 13th September 2015 while running the Wachau half marathon. In this post, the School of Data team (both past and present) remember what he gave to the project, and our favourite moments from working with him.” Michael joined School of Data as one of the first team members in 2012 and worked on the project up until October 2014. In this time, he trained and helped hundreds of activists from across the world and built an amazing community of likeminded people – a community which is now thriving, in large part due to the contributions and skills that Michael gave. His extraordinary intelligence and skills gave School of Data an “edge”; for him, anything done on the project had to be both educational and fun, else there was no point in doing it. He taught all of us personally a huge amount about what it means to be a ‘data trainer’. He was a great colleague, and an even better friend. The School of Data team is largely remote – we work from wherever we like and connect with each other online. This means we don’t see each other so often and most of our contact is done via emails, online meetings or, as usually was the case with Michael, Skype chats from airport lounges…
Playing ‘Where is Michael?’ was always a fun game.

Playing ‘Where is Michael?’ was always a fun game.

It also means that when we do meet in person, the time is precious. We travelled together across the world – and wow, did Michael travel. He was always up for spontaneous trips (sometimes with as little as twelve hours notice before intercontinental travel), for throwing himself into getting to know new communities, to spend nights dancing even with early starts due the next day. Colourful both in personality and turnout, we will always remember Michael in his shiny cape at Mozfest when we ran our first ever data expedition – our Data Diva. 8173097617_5ebd4a94b2_zPeople genuinely never forgot Michael – he was charismatic and commanded people’s attention. He managed to understand data and people, and he could inspire every single person he met, no matter how many were in the workshop. He was a true polymath, too – he went from medical doctor, to academic, to data trainer/coder, to a journalist – and all before the age of 35. To us, Michael was intelligent, always ready to help people, honest (sometimes painfully), funny and, as all the best people are, wonderfully awkward. Most of all, he was generous with his time, humble, and thoughtful. He managed to foster an environment where anyone could ask him a question, or for help on building something – and he would answer without any fuss, and with contagious enthusiasm. 8683527172_2ea6930fdf_o (1)As a key architect of many of School of Data’s workshop styles, particularly Data Clinics and Data Expeditions, his legacy lives on through the character sheets he made just 10 minutes before the first expedition started, and in many of the materials the community use today 8173129738_06a92976cb_m 8173096061_83bd95bac8_mWhen he moved on to derStandard.at, we were torn between happiness for him – that he was starting a new stage in his life – and sadness, that he was leaving our team. He was so excited about it though: finally, he would “stop talking about data journalism and start doing it.” As a leaving gift, we made him this video to show him how much we appreciated him. Watch it from YouTube. We “the Team of Open Knowledge Nepal” met him during his visit at Nepal for “Open Aid Data Bootcamp 2014 Nepal”. Bedside being an awesome Data Diva, he was a really good Human Being. May his soul rest in peace. Here are some photos from his Nepal visit:

1403014_663865340316186_7629432323719393036_o  1493536_663276910375029_6292061856107192354_o1961674_663280980374622_529895436118032986_o 10317588_663280590374661_8352466045646900454_o

In memory of Michael Bauer

- September 27, 2015 in Data Diva, Featured, Mchal, Memories, Open Knowledge, School of Data

Reblogged from School of Data Blog, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike v3.0 License   “It was with great sadness that we learned last week that we had lost one of our greats. Michael Bauer passed away suddenly on 13th September 2015 while running the Wachau half marathon. In this post, the School of Data team (both past and present) remember what he gave to the project, and our favourite moments from working with him.” Michael joined School of Data as one of the first team members in 2012 and worked on the project up until October 2014. In this time, he trained and helped hundreds of activists from across the world and built an amazing community of likeminded people – a community which is now thriving, in large part due to the contributions and skills that Michael gave. His extraordinary intelligence and skills gave School of Data an “edge”; for him, anything done on the project had to be both educational and fun, else there was no point in doing it. He taught all of us personally a huge amount about what it means to be a ‘data trainer’. He was a great colleague, and an even better friend. The School of Data team is largely remote – we work from wherever we like and connect with each other online. This means we don’t see each other so often and most of our contact is done via emails, online meetings or, as usually was the case with Michael, Skype chats from airport lounges…
Playing ‘Where is Michael?’ was always a fun game.

Playing ‘Where is Michael?’ was always a fun game.

It also means that when we do meet in person, the time is precious. We travelled together across the world – and wow, did Michael travel. He was always up for spontaneous trips (sometimes with as little as twelve hours notice before intercontinental travel), for throwing himself into getting to know new communities, to spend nights dancing even with early starts due the next day. Colourful both in personality and turnout, we will always remember Michael in his shiny cape at Mozfest when we ran our first ever data expedition – our Data Diva. 8173097617_5ebd4a94b2_zPeople genuinely never forgot Michael – he was charismatic and commanded people’s attention. He managed to understand data and people, and he could inspire every single person he met, no matter how many were in the workshop. He was a true polymath, too – he went from medical doctor, to academic, to data trainer/coder, to a journalist – and all before the age of 35. To us, Michael was intelligent, always ready to help people, honest (sometimes painfully), funny and, as all the best people are, wonderfully awkward. Most of all, he was generous with his time, humble, and thoughtful. He managed to foster an environment where anyone could ask him a question, or for help on building something – and he would answer without any fuss, and with contagious enthusiasm. 8683527172_2ea6930fdf_o (1)As a key architect of many of School of Data’s workshop styles, particularly Data Clinics and Data Expeditions, his legacy lives on through the character sheets he made just 10 minutes before the first expedition started, and in many of the materials the community use today 8173129738_06a92976cb_m 8173096061_83bd95bac8_mWhen he moved on to derStandard.at, we were torn between happiness for him – that he was starting a new stage in his life – and sadness, that he was leaving our team. He was so excited about it though: finally, he would “stop talking about data journalism and start doing it.” As a leaving gift, we made him this video to show him how much we appreciated him. Watch it from YouTube. We “the Team of Open Knowledge Nepal” met him during his visit at Nepal for “Open Aid Data Bootcamp 2014 Nepal”. Bedside being an awesome Data Diva, he was a really good Human Being. May his soul rest in peace. Here are some photos from his Nepal visit:

1403014_663865340316186_7629432323719393036_o  1493536_663276910375029_6292061856107192354_o1961674_663280980374622_529895436118032986_o 10317588_663280590374661_8352466045646900454_o