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Fourth Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL-2015): Resources and Applications

- December 18, 2014 in ldl, ldl-2015, linguistics, linked data, linked data in linguistics, llod, natural language processing, ontologies, open linguistics, Semantic Web, WG Linguistics

We are very happy to announce the next instantiation of the OWLG’s Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL) workshop series. The OWLG’s fourth Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics is becoming increasingly international, and, for the first time, will be held outside of Europe: on June 31st, 2015, in Beijing, China, collocated with ACL-IJCNLP 2015. See you in Beijing!
  4th Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL-2015): Resources and Applications Beijing, June 31st, 2015, http://ldl2015.linguistic-lod.org, collocated with ACL-IJCNLP 2015   Workshop Description The substantial growth in the quantity, diversity and complexity of linguistic data accessible on the Web has led to many new and interesting research areas in Natural Language Processing (NLP) and linguistics. However, resource interoperability represents a major challenge that still needs to be addressed, in particular if information from different sources is combined. With its fourth instantiation, the Linked Data in Linguistics workshop continues to provide a major forum to discuss the creation of linguistic resources on the web using linked data principles, as well as issues of interoperability, distribution protocols, access and integration of language resources and natural language processing pipelines developed on this basis. As a result of the preceding workshops, a considerable number of resources is now available in the Linguistic Linked Open Data (LLOD) cloud [1]. LDL-2015 will thus specifically welcome papers addressing the usage aspect of Linked Data and related technologies in NLP, linguistics and neighboring fields, such as Digital Humanities. Organized by the interdisciplinary Open Linguistics Working Group (OWLG) [2], the LDL workshop series is open to researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including (computational) linguistics and NLP, but also the Semantic Web, linguistic typology, corpus linguistics, terminology and lexicography. In 2015, we plan to increase the involvement of the LIDER project [3] and the W3C Community Group on Linked Data for Language Technology (LD4LT) [4], to build on their efforts to facilitate the use of linked data and language resources for commercial applications, and to continue the success of LIDER‘s roadmapping workshop series in engagement with enterprise. [1] http://linguistics.okfn.org/resources/llod/ [2] http://linguistics.okfn.org/ [3] http://www.lider-project.eu/ [4] http://www.w3.org/community/ld4lt/ Topics of Interest We invite presentations of algorithms, methodologies, experiments, use cases, project proposals and position papers regarding the creation, publication or application of linguistic data collections and their linking with other resources, as well as descriptions of such data. This includes, but is not limited to, the following: A. Resources
  • Modelling linguistic data and metadata with OWL and/or RDF.
  • Ontologies for linguistic data and metadata collections as well as cross-lingual retrieval.
  • Descriptions of data sets following Linked Data principles.
  • Legal and social aspects of Linguistic Linked Open Data.
  • Best practices for the publication and linking of multilingual knowledge resources.
B. Applications
  • Applications of such data, other ontologies or linked data from any subdiscipline of linguistics or NLP.
  • The role of (Linguistic) Linked Open Data to address challenges of multilinguality and interoperability.
  • Application and applicability of (Linguistic) Linked Open Data for knowledge extraction, machine translation and other NLP tasks.
  • NLP contributions to (Linguistic) Linked Open Data.
We invite both long (8 pages and 2 pages of references, formatted according to the ACL-IJCNLP guidelines) and short papers (4 pages and 2 pages of references) representing original research, innovative approaches and resource types, use cases or in-depth discussions. Short papers may also represent project proposals, work in progress or data set descriptions. Dataset Description Papers In addition to full papers and regular short papers, authors may submit short papers with a dataset descriptions describing a resource’s availability, published location and key statistics (such as size). Such papers do not need to show a novel method for the creation or publishing of the data but instead will be judged on the quality, usefulness and clarity of description given in the paper. For contact information, submission details and last-minute updates, please consult our website under http://ldl2015.linguistic-lod.org Important Dates
  • May 8th, 2015: Paper submission
  • June 5th, 2015: Notification of Acceptance
  • June 21st, 2015: Camera-Ready Copy
  • June 31st, 2015: Workshop
Organizing Committee
  • Christian Chiarcos (Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany)
  • Philipp Cimiano (Bielefeld University, Germany)
  • Nancy Ide (Vassar College, USA)
  • John P. McCrae (Bielefeld University, Germany)
  • Petya Osenova (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria)
Program Committee
  • Eneko Agirre (University of the Basque Country, Spain)
  • Guadalupe Aguado (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Claire Bonial (University of Colorado at Boulder, USA)
  • Peter Bouda (Interdisciplinary Centre for Social and Language Documentation, Portugal)
  • Antonio Branco (University of Lisbon, Portugal)
  • Martin Brümmer (University of Leipzig, Germany)
  • Paul Buitelaar (INSIGHT, NUIG Galway, Ireland)
  • Steve Cassidy (Macquarie University, Australia)
  • Nicoletta Calzolari (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Thierry Declerck (DFKI, Germany)
  • Ernesto William De Luca (University of Applied Sciences Potsdam, Germany)
  • Gerard de Melo (University of California at Berkeley)
  • Judith Eckle-Kohler (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany)
  • Francesca Frontini (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Jeff Good (University at Buffalo)
  • Asunción Gómez Pérez (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Jorge Gracia (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Yoshihiko Hayashi (Waseda University, Japan)
  • Fahad Khan (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Seiji Koide (National Institute of Informatics, Japan)
  • Lutz Maicher (Universität Leipzig, Germany)
  • Elena Montiel-Ponsoda (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Steven Moran (Universität Zürich, Switzerland)
  • Sebastian Nordhoff (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany)
  • Antonio Pareja-Lora (Universidad Complutense Madrid, Spain)
  • Maciej Piasecki (Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland)
  • Francesca Quattri (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong)
  • Laurent Romary (INRIA, France)
  • Felix Sasaki (Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz, Germany)
  • Andrea Schalley (Griffith University, Australia)
  • Gilles Sérraset (Joseph Fourier University, France)
  • Kiril Simov (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria)
  • Milena Slavcheva (JRC-Brussels, Belgium)
  • Armando Stellato (University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Italy)
  • Marco Tadic (University of Zagreb, Croatia)
  • Marieke van Erp (VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Daniel Vila (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid)
  • Cristina Vertan (University of Hamburg, Germany)
  • Walther v. Hahn (University of Hamburg, Germany)
  • Menzo Windhouwer (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands)

Fourth Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL-2015): Resources and Applications

- December 18, 2014 in ldl, ldl-2015, linguistics, linked data, linked data in linguistics, llod, natural language processing, ontologies, open linguistics, Semantic Web, WG Linguistics

We are very happy to announce the next instantiation of the OWLG’s Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL) workshop series. The OWLG’s fourth Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics is becoming increasingly international, and, for the first time, will be held outside of Europe: on June 31st, 2015, in Beijing, China, collocated with ACL-IJCNLP 2015.

See you in Beijing!


 

4th Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL-2015): Resources and Applications
Beijing, June 31st, 2015, http://ldl2015.linguistic-lod.org, collocated with ACL-IJCNLP 2015

 

Workshop Description

The substantial growth in the quantity, diversity and complexity of linguistic data accessible on the Web has led to many new and interesting research areas in Natural Language Processing (NLP) and linguistics. However, resource interoperability represents a major challenge that still needs to be addressed, in particular if information from different sources is combined. With its fourth instantiation, the Linked Data in Linguistics workshop continues to provide a major forum to discuss the creation of linguistic resources on the web using linked data principles, as well as issues of interoperability, distribution protocols, access and integration of language resources and natural language processing pipelines developed on this basis.

As a result of the preceding workshops, a considerable number of resources is now available in the Linguistic Linked Open Data (LLOD) cloud [1]. LDL-2015 will thus specifically welcome papers addressing the usage aspect of Linked Data and related technologies in NLP, linguistics and neighboring fields, such as Digital Humanities.

Organized by the interdisciplinary Open Linguistics Working Group (OWLG) [2], the LDL workshop series is open to researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including (computational) linguistics and NLP, but also the Semantic Web, linguistic typology, corpus linguistics, terminology and lexicography. In 2015, we plan to increase the involvement of the LIDER project [3] and the W3C Community Group on Linked Data for Language Technology (LD4LT) [4], to build on their efforts to facilitate the use of linked data and language resources for commercial applications, and to continue the success of LIDER‘s roadmapping workshop series in engagement with enterprise.

[1] http://linguistics.okfn.org/resources/llod/
[2] http://linguistics.okfn.org/
[3] http://www.lider-project.eu/
[4] http://www.w3.org/community/ld4lt/

Topics of Interest

We invite presentations of algorithms, methodologies, experiments, use cases, project proposals and position papers regarding the creation, publication or application of linguistic data collections and their linking with other resources, as well as descriptions of such data. This includes, but is not limited to, the following:

A. Resources

  • Modelling linguistic data and metadata with OWL and/or RDF.
  • Ontologies for linguistic data and metadata collections as well as cross-lingual retrieval.
  • Descriptions of data sets following Linked Data principles.
  • Legal and social aspects of Linguistic Linked Open Data.
  • Best practices for the publication and linking of multilingual knowledge resources.

B. Applications

  • Applications of such data, other ontologies or linked data from any subdiscipline of linguistics or NLP.
  • The role of (Linguistic) Linked Open Data to address challenges of multilinguality and interoperability.
  • Application and applicability of (Linguistic) Linked Open Data for knowledge extraction, machine translation and other NLP tasks.
  • NLP contributions to (Linguistic) Linked Open Data.

We invite both long (8 pages and 2 pages of references, formatted according to the ACL-IJCNLP guidelines) and short papers (4 pages and 2 pages of references) representing original research, innovative approaches and resource types, use cases or in-depth discussions. Short papers may also represent project proposals, work in progress or data set descriptions.

Dataset Description Papers

In addition to full papers and regular short papers, authors may submit short papers with a dataset descriptions describing a resource’s availability, published location and key statistics (such as size). Such papers do not need to show a novel method for the creation or publishing of the data but *instead* will be judged on the quality, usefulness and clarity of description given in the paper.

For contact information, submission details and last-minute updates, please consult our website under http://ldl2015.linguistic-lod.org

Important Dates

  • May 8th, 2015: Paper submission
  • June 5th, 2015: Notification of Acceptance
  • June 21st, 2015: Camera-Ready Copy
  • June 31st, 2015: Workshop

Organizing Committee

  • Christian Chiarcos (Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany)
  • Philipp Cimiano (Bielefeld University, Germany)
  • Nancy Ide (Vassar College, USA)
  • John P. McCrae (Bielefeld University, Germany)
  • Petya Osenova (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria)

Program Committee

  • Eneko Agirre (University of the Basque Country, Spain)
  • Guadalupe Aguado (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Claire Bonial (University of Colorado at Boulder, USA)
  • Peter Bouda (Interdisciplinary Centre for Social and Language Documentation, Portugal)
  • Antonio Branco (University of Lisbon, Portugal)
  • Martin Brümmer (University of Leipzig, Germany)
  • Paul Buitelaar (INSIGHT, NUIG Galway, Ireland)
  • Steve Cassidy (Macquarie University, Australia)
  • Nicoletta Calzolari (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Thierry Declerck (DFKI, Germany)
  • Ernesto William De Luca (University of Applied Sciences Potsdam, Germany)
  • Gerard de Melo (University of California at Berkeley)
  • Judith Eckle-Kohler (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany)
  • Francesca Frontini (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Jeff Good (University at Buffalo)
  • Asunción Gómez Pérez (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Jorge Gracia (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Yoshihiko Hayashi (Waseda University, Japan)
  • Fahad Khan (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Seiji Koide (National Institute of Informatics, Japan)
  • Lutz Maicher (Universität Leipzig, Germany)
  • Elena Montiel-Ponsoda (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Steven Moran (Universität Zürich, Switzerland)
  • Sebastian Nordhoff (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany)
  • Antonio Pareja-Lora (Universidad Complutense Madrid, Spain)
  • Maciej Piasecki (Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland)
  • Francesca Quattri (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong)
  • Laurent Romary (INRIA, France)
  • Felix Sasaki (Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz, Germany)
  • Andrea Schalley (Griffith University, Australia)
  • Gilles Sérraset (Joseph Fourier University, France)
  • Kiril Simov (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria)
  • Milena Slavcheva (JRC-Brussels, Belgium)
  • Armando Stellato (University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Italy)
  • Marco Tadic (University of Zagreb, Croatia)
  • Marieke van Erp (VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Daniel Vila (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid)
  • Cristina Vertan (University of Hamburg, Germany)
  • Walther v. Hahn (University of Hamburg, Germany)
  • Menzo Windhouwer (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands)

Fourth Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL-2015): Resources and Applications

- December 18, 2014 in ldl, ldl-2015, linguistics, linked data, linked data in linguistics, llod, natural language processing, ontologies, open linguistics, Semantic Web, WG Linguistics

We are very happy to announce the next instantiation of the OWLG’s Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL) workshop series. The OWLG’s fourth Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics is becoming increasingly international, and, for the first time, will be held outside of Europe: on June 31st, 2015, in Beijing, China, collocated with ACL-IJCNLP 2015. See you in Beijing!
  4th Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL-2015): Resources and Applications
Beijing, June 31st, 2015, http://ldl2015.linguistic-lod.org, collocated with ACL-IJCNLP 2015   Workshop Description The substantial growth in the quantity, diversity and complexity of linguistic data accessible on the Web has led to many new and interesting research areas in Natural Language Processing (NLP) and linguistics. However, resource interoperability represents a major challenge that still needs to be addressed, in particular if information from different sources is combined. With its fourth instantiation, the Linked Data in Linguistics workshop continues to provide a major forum to discuss the creation of linguistic resources on the web using linked data principles, as well as issues of interoperability, distribution protocols, access and integration of language resources and natural language processing pipelines developed on this basis. As a result of the preceding workshops, a considerable number of resources is now available in the Linguistic Linked Open Data (LLOD) cloud [1]. LDL-2015 will thus specifically welcome papers addressing the usage aspect of Linked Data and related technologies in NLP, linguistics and neighboring fields, such as Digital Humanities. Organized by the interdisciplinary Open Linguistics Working Group (OWLG) [2], the LDL workshop series is open to researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including (computational) linguistics and NLP, but also the Semantic Web, linguistic typology, corpus linguistics, terminology and lexicography. In 2015, we plan to increase the involvement of the LIDER project [3] and the W3C Community Group on Linked Data for Language Technology (LD4LT) [4], to build on their efforts to facilitate the use of linked data and language resources for commercial applications, and to continue the success of LIDER‘s roadmapping workshop series in engagement with enterprise. [1] http://linguistics.okfn.org/resources/llod/
[2] http://linguistics.okfn.org/
[3] http://www.lider-project.eu/
[4] http://www.w3.org/community/ld4lt/ Topics of Interest
We invite presentations of algorithms, methodologies, experiments, use cases, project proposals and position papers regarding the creation, publication or application of linguistic data collections and their linking with other resources, as well as descriptions of such data. This includes, but is not limited to, the following: A. Resources
  • Modelling linguistic data and metadata with OWL and/or RDF.
  • Ontologies for linguistic data and metadata collections as well as cross-lingual retrieval.
  • Descriptions of data sets following Linked Data principles.
  • Legal and social aspects of Linguistic Linked Open Data.
  • Best practices for the publication and linking of multilingual knowledge resources.
B. Applications
  • Applications of such data, other ontologies or linked data from any subdiscipline of linguistics or NLP.
  • The role of (Linguistic) Linked Open Data to address challenges of multilinguality and interoperability.
  • Application and applicability of (Linguistic) Linked Open Data for knowledge extraction, machine translation and other NLP tasks.
  • NLP contributions to (Linguistic) Linked Open Data.
We invite both long (8 pages and 2 pages of references, formatted according to the ACL-IJCNLP guidelines) and short papers (4 pages and 2 pages of references) representing original research, innovative approaches and resource types, use cases or in-depth discussions. Short papers may also represent project proposals, work in progress or data set descriptions. Dataset Description Papers In addition to full papers and regular short papers, authors may submit short papers with a dataset descriptions describing a resource’s availability, published location and key statistics (such as size). Such papers do not need to show a novel method for the creation or publishing of the data but instead will be judged on the quality, usefulness and clarity of description given in the paper. For contact information, submission details and last-minute updates, please consult our website under http://ldl2015.linguistic-lod.org Important Dates
  • May 8th, 2015: Paper submission
  • June 5th, 2015: Notification of Acceptance
  • June 21st, 2015: Camera-Ready Copy
  • June 31st, 2015: Workshop
Organizing Committee
  • Christian Chiarcos (Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany)
  • Philipp Cimiano (Bielefeld University, Germany)
  • Nancy Ide (Vassar College, USA)
  • John P. McCrae (Bielefeld University, Germany)
  • Petya Osenova (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria)
Program Committee
  • Eneko Agirre (University of the Basque Country, Spain)
  • Guadalupe Aguado (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Claire Bonial (University of Colorado at Boulder, USA)
  • Peter Bouda (Interdisciplinary Centre for Social and Language Documentation, Portugal)
  • Antonio Branco (University of Lisbon, Portugal)
  • Martin Brümmer (University of Leipzig, Germany)
  • Paul Buitelaar (INSIGHT, NUIG Galway, Ireland)
  • Steve Cassidy (Macquarie University, Australia)
  • Nicoletta Calzolari (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Thierry Declerck (DFKI, Germany)
  • Ernesto William De Luca (University of Applied Sciences Potsdam, Germany)
  • Gerard de Melo (University of California at Berkeley)
  • Judith Eckle-Kohler (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany)
  • Francesca Frontini (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Jeff Good (University at Buffalo)
  • Asunción Gómez Pérez (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Jorge Gracia (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Yoshihiko Hayashi (Waseda University, Japan)
  • Fahad Khan (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Seiji Koide (National Institute of Informatics, Japan)
  • Lutz Maicher (Universität Leipzig, Germany)
  • Elena Montiel-Ponsoda (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Steven Moran (Universität Zürich, Switzerland)
  • Sebastian Nordhoff (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany)
  • Antonio Pareja-Lora (Universidad Complutense Madrid, Spain)
  • Maciej Piasecki (Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland)
  • Francesca Quattri (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong)
  • Laurent Romary (INRIA, France)
  • Felix Sasaki (Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz, Germany)
  • Andrea Schalley (Griffith University, Australia)
  • Gilles Sérraset (Joseph Fourier University, France)
  • Kiril Simov (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria)
  • Milena Slavcheva (JRC-Brussels, Belgium)
  • Armando Stellato (University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Italy)
  • Marco Tadic (University of Zagreb, Croatia)
  • Marieke van Erp (VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Daniel Vila (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid)
  • Cristina Vertan (University of Hamburg, Germany)
  • Walther v. Hahn (University of Hamburg, Germany)
  • Menzo Windhouwer (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands)

Fourth Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL-2015): Resources and Applications

- December 18, 2014 in ldl, ldl-2015, linguistics, linked data, linked data in linguistics, llod, natural language processing, ontologies, open linguistics, Semantic Web, WG Linguistics

We are very happy to announce the next instantiation of the OWLG’s Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL) workshop series. The OWLG’s fourth Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics is becoming increasingly international, and, for the first time, will be held outside of Europe: on June 31st, 2015, in Beijing, China, collocated with ACL-IJCNLP 2015. See you in Beijing!
  4th Workshop on Linked Data in Linguistics (LDL-2015): Resources and Applications Beijing, June 31st, 2015, http://ldl2015.linguistic-lod.org, collocated with ACL-IJCNLP 2015   Workshop Description The substantial growth in the quantity, diversity and complexity of linguistic data accessible on the Web has led to many new and interesting research areas in Natural Language Processing (NLP) and linguistics. However, resource interoperability represents a major challenge that still needs to be addressed, in particular if information from different sources is combined. With its fourth instantiation, the Linked Data in Linguistics workshop continues to provide a major forum to discuss the creation of linguistic resources on the web using linked data principles, as well as issues of interoperability, distribution protocols, access and integration of language resources and natural language processing pipelines developed on this basis. As a result of the preceding workshops, a considerable number of resources is now available in the Linguistic Linked Open Data (LLOD) cloud [1]. LDL-2015 will thus specifically welcome papers addressing the usage aspect of Linked Data and related technologies in NLP, linguistics and neighboring fields, such as Digital Humanities. Organized by the interdisciplinary Open Linguistics Working Group (OWLG) [2], the LDL workshop series is open to researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including (computational) linguistics and NLP, but also the Semantic Web, linguistic typology, corpus linguistics, terminology and lexicography. In 2015, we plan to increase the involvement of the LIDER project [3] and the W3C Community Group on Linked Data for Language Technology (LD4LT) [4], to build on their efforts to facilitate the use of linked data and language resources for commercial applications, and to continue the success of LIDER‘s roadmapping workshop series in engagement with enterprise. [1] http://linguistics.okfn.org/resources/llod/ [2] http://linguistics.okfn.org/ [3] http://www.lider-project.eu/ [4] http://www.w3.org/community/ld4lt/ Topics of Interest We invite presentations of algorithms, methodologies, experiments, use cases, project proposals and position papers regarding the creation, publication or application of linguistic data collections and their linking with other resources, as well as descriptions of such data. This includes, but is not limited to, the following: A. Resources
  • Modelling linguistic data and metadata with OWL and/or RDF.
  • Ontologies for linguistic data and metadata collections as well as cross-lingual retrieval.
  • Descriptions of data sets following Linked Data principles.
  • Legal and social aspects of Linguistic Linked Open Data.
  • Best practices for the publication and linking of multilingual knowledge resources.
B. Applications
  • Applications of such data, other ontologies or linked data from any subdiscipline of linguistics or NLP.
  • The role of (Linguistic) Linked Open Data to address challenges of multilinguality and interoperability.
  • Application and applicability of (Linguistic) Linked Open Data for knowledge extraction, machine translation and other NLP tasks.
  • NLP contributions to (Linguistic) Linked Open Data.
We invite both long (8 pages and 2 pages of references, formatted according to the ACL-IJCNLP guidelines) and short papers (4 pages and 2 pages of references) representing original research, innovative approaches and resource types, use cases or in-depth discussions. Short papers may also represent project proposals, work in progress or data set descriptions. Dataset Description Papers In addition to full papers and regular short papers, authors may submit short papers with a dataset descriptions describing a resource’s availability, published location and key statistics (such as size). Such papers do not need to show a novel method for the creation or publishing of the data but instead will be judged on the quality, usefulness and clarity of description given in the paper. For contact information, submission details and last-minute updates, please consult our website under http://ldl2015.linguistic-lod.org Important Dates
  • May 8th, 2015: Paper submission
  • June 5th, 2015: Notification of Acceptance
  • June 21st, 2015: Camera-Ready Copy
  • June 31st, 2015: Workshop
Organizing Committee
  • Christian Chiarcos (Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany)
  • Philipp Cimiano (Bielefeld University, Germany)
  • Nancy Ide (Vassar College, USA)
  • John P. McCrae (Bielefeld University, Germany)
  • Petya Osenova (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria)
Program Committee
  • Eneko Agirre (University of the Basque Country, Spain)
  • Guadalupe Aguado (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Claire Bonial (University of Colorado at Boulder, USA)
  • Peter Bouda (Interdisciplinary Centre for Social and Language Documentation, Portugal)
  • Antonio Branco (University of Lisbon, Portugal)
  • Martin Brümmer (University of Leipzig, Germany)
  • Paul Buitelaar (INSIGHT, NUIG Galway, Ireland)
  • Steve Cassidy (Macquarie University, Australia)
  • Nicoletta Calzolari (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Thierry Declerck (DFKI, Germany)
  • Ernesto William De Luca (University of Applied Sciences Potsdam, Germany)
  • Gerard de Melo (University of California at Berkeley)
  • Judith Eckle-Kohler (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany)
  • Francesca Frontini (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Jeff Good (University at Buffalo)
  • Asunción Gómez Pérez (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Jorge Gracia (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Yoshihiko Hayashi (Waseda University, Japan)
  • Fahad Khan (ILC-CNR, Italy)
  • Seiji Koide (National Institute of Informatics, Japan)
  • Lutz Maicher (Universität Leipzig, Germany)
  • Elena Montiel-Ponsoda (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain)
  • Steven Moran (Universität Zürich, Switzerland)
  • Sebastian Nordhoff (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany)
  • Antonio Pareja-Lora (Universidad Complutense Madrid, Spain)
  • Maciej Piasecki (Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland)
  • Francesca Quattri (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong)
  • Laurent Romary (INRIA, France)
  • Felix Sasaki (Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz, Germany)
  • Andrea Schalley (Griffith University, Australia)
  • Gilles Sérraset (Joseph Fourier University, France)
  • Kiril Simov (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria)
  • Milena Slavcheva (JRC-Brussels, Belgium)
  • Armando Stellato (University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Italy)
  • Marco Tadic (University of Zagreb, Croatia)
  • Marieke van Erp (VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Daniel Vila (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid)
  • Cristina Vertan (University of Hamburg, Germany)
  • Walther v. Hahn (University of Hamburg, Germany)
  • Menzo Windhouwer (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands)

KSWC 2013

- November 24, 2013 in KSWC, linked data, Open Data, Semantic Web, 이벤트, 정보

최근 오픈 데이터, 공공 데이터에 대한 관심이 늘어나고 있습니다. 미국, 영국에서 시작되어 국제기구로 확대되고 있는 데이터 개방은 국내에서도 본격적화되고 있습니다. 그러나 데이터 개방에 대한 정부의 적극적인 노력에도 불구하고 데이터를 효과적으로 개방하고 활용하는데 많은 어려움이 있습니다. 2013 KSWC는 데이터 개방의 주체인 정부와 자치단체의 경험을 공유하고, 기술적 관점에서 시맨틱 웹과 링크드 데이터의 현실을 논의합니다. 더불어, 커뮤니티를 중심으로 진행되고 있는 오픈 데이터 실제 활용 사례를 소개합니다. 오픈 데이터와 관련한 실용적인 사례와 기술적 해법을 찾을 수 있는 의미있는 시간이 될 것으로 기대합니다. 행사와 관련된 자세한 정보는 행사 홈페이지를 참고하시기 바랍니다.
  • 일시: 2013년 11월 30일 토요일 13:00 ~ 18:00
  • 장소: 코엑스
  • 참가비: 일반 (5만원), 학생 (1만원)
  • 주관: OKF Korea
  • 후원: 서울특별시, 한국정보화진흥원, 한국데이터사이언스학회
  • 행사 홈페이지: http://kswc.org/
  • 등록 페이지 바로가기: http://onoffmix.com/event/20228

KSWC

Nature’s data platform strongly expanded

- July 20, 2012 in Data, News, Semantic Web

Nature has largely expanded its Linked Open Data platform that was launched in April 2012. From today’s press release: Logo of the journal Nature used in its first issue on Nov. 4, 1869 “As part of its wider commitment to open science, Nature Publishing Group’s (NPG) Linked Data Platform now hosts more than 270 million Resource Description Framework (RDF) statements. It has been expanded more than ten times, in a growing number of datasets. These datasets have been created under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) waiver, which permits maximal use/reuse of this data. The data is now being updated in real-time and new triples are being dynamically added to the datasets as articles are published on nature.com. Available at http://data.nature.com, the platform now contains bibliographic metadata for all NPG titles, including Scientific American back to 1845, and NPG’s academic journals published on behalf of our society partners. NPG’s Linked Data Platform now includes citation metadata for all published article references. The NPG subject ontology is also significantly expanded. The new release expands the platform to include additional RDF statements of bibliographic, citation, data citation and ontology metadata, which are organised into 12 datasets – an increase from the 8 datasets previously available. Full snapshots of this data release are now available for download, either by individual dataset or as a complete package, for registered users at http://developers.nature.com.“ This is exciting, especially the commitment to real-time updates is a great move and shows how serious Linked Open Data becomes in general and in particular in the realm of bibliographic data. Also, Nature now uses the Data Hub and has registered the data seperated into several datasets.

Europeana and Linked Open Data

- March 19, 2012 in Data, Guest post, lod-lam, Semantic Web

Europeana has recently released a new version of its Linked Data Pilot, data.europeana.eu. We now publish data for 2.4 million objects under an open metadata licence: CC0, the Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication. This post elaborates on this earlier one by Naomi.

The interest of Europeana for Linked Open Data

Europeana aims to provide the widest access possible to the European cultural heritage massively published through digital resources by hundreds of musea, libraries and archives. This includes empowering other actors to build services that contribute to such access. Making data openly available to the public and private sectors alike is thus central to Europeana’s business strategy. We are also trying to provide a better service by making available richer data than the one very often published by cultural institutions. Data where millions of texts, images, videos and sounds are linked to other relevant resources: persons, places, concepts… Europeana has therefore been interested for a while in Linked Data, as a technology that facilitates these objectives. We entirely subscribe to the views expressed in the W3C Library Linked Data report, which shows the benefits (but also acknowledges the challenges) of Linked Data for the cultural sector.

Europeana’s first toe in the Linked Data water

Last year, we released a first Linked Data pilot at data.europeana.eu. This has been a very exciting moment, a first opportunity for us to play with Linked Data. We could deploy our prototype relatively easily and the whole experience was extremely valuable, from a technical perspective. In particular, this has been the first large-scale implementation of Europeana’s new approach to metadata, the Europeana Data Model (EDM). This model enables the representation of much richer data compared to the current format used by Europeana in its production service. First, our pilot could use EDM’s ability to represent several perspectives over a cultural object. We have used it to distinguish the original metadata our providers send us, from the data that we add ourselves. Among the Europeana data there are indeed enrichments that are created automatically and are not checked by professional data curators. For trust purposes, it is important that data consumers can see the difference. We could also better highlight a part of Europeana’s added value as a central point for accessing digitized cultural material, in direct connection with the above mentioned enrichment. Europeana indeed employs semantic extraction tools that connect its objects with large multilingual reference resources available as Linked Data, in particular Geonames and GEMET. This new metadata allows us to deliver a better search service, especially in a European context. With the Linked Data pilot we could explicitly point at them, in the same environment they are published in. We hope this will help the entire community to better recognize the importance of these sources, and continue to provide authority resources in interoperable Linked Data format, using for example the SKOS vocabulary. If you are interested in more lessons learnt from a technical perspective, we have published more of them in a technical paper at the Dublin Core conference last year. Among the less positive aspects, data.europeana.eu is still not part of the production system behind the main europeana.eu portal. It does not come with the guarantee of service we would like to offer for the linked data server, though the provision of data dumps is not impacted by this.

Making progress on Open Data

Another downside is that data.europeana.eu publishes data only for a subset of the objects the our main portal provides access to. We started with 3.5 million objects over a total of 20 millions. These were selected after a call for volunteers, to which only few providers answered. Additionally, we could not release our metadata under fully Open terms. This was clearly an obstacle to the re-use of our data. After several months we have thus released a second version of data.europeana.eu. Though still a pilot, it nows contain fully open metadata (CC0). The new version concerns an even smaller subset of our collections: in February 2012, data.europeana.eu contains metadata on 2.4 million objects. But this must be considered in context. The qualitative step of fully open publication is crucial to us. And over the past year, we have started an active campaign to convince our community of opening up their metadata, allowing everyone to make it work harder for the benefits of end users. The current metadata served at data.europeana come from data providers who have reacted early and positively to our efforts. We trust we will be able to make metadata available for many more objects in the coming year. In fact we hope that this Linked Open Data pilot can contribute a part of our Open Data advocacy message. We believe such technology can trigger third parties to develop innovative applications and services, stimulating end users’ interest for digitized heritage. This would of course help to convince more partners to contribute metadata openly in the future. We have released next to our new pilot an animation that conveys exactly this message, you can view it here. For additional information about access to and technical details of the dataset, see data.europeana.eu and our entry on the Data Hub.

Linked Data at the Biblioteca Nacional de España

- February 2, 2012 in Data, Guest post, lod-lam, national library, Semantic Web

The following guest post is from the National Library of Spain and the Ontology Engineering Group (Technical University of Madrid (UPM)). Datos.bne.es is an initiative of the Biblioteca Nacional de España (BNE) whose aim is to enrich the Semantic Web with library data. This initiative is part of the project “Linked Data at the BNE”, supported by the BNE in cooperation with the Ontology Engineering Group (OEG) at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM). The first meeting took place in September 2010, whereas the collaboration agreement was signed in October 2010. The first set of data was transformed and linked in April 2011, but a more significant set of data was done in December 2011. The initiative was presented in the auditorium of the BNE on 14th December 2011 by Asunción Gómez-Pérez, Professor at the UPM and Daniel Vila-Suero, Project Lead (OEG-UPM), and by Ricardo Santos, Chief of Authorities, and Ana Manchado Mangas, Chief of Bibliographic Projects, both from the BNE. The attendant audience enjoyed the invaluable participation of Gordon Dunsire, Chair of the IFLA Namespace Group. The concept of Linked Data was first introduced by Tim Berners-Lee in the context of the Semantic Web. It refers to the method of publishing and linking structured data on the Web. Hence, the project “Linked Data at the BNE” involves the transformation of BNE bibliographic and authority catalogues into RDF as well as their publication and linkage by means of IFLA-backed ontologies and vocabularies, with the aim of making data available in the so-called cloud of “Linked Open Data”. This project focuses on connecting the published data to other data sets in the cloud, such as VIAF (Virtual International Authority File) or DBpedia. With this initiative, the BNE takes the challenge of publishing bibliographic and authority data in RDF, following the Linked Data Principles and under the CC0 (Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication) open license. Thereby, Spain joins the initiatives that national libraries from countries such as the United Kingdom and Germany have recently launched.

Vocabularies and models

IFLA-backed ontologies and models, widely agreed upon by the library community, have been used to represent the resources in RDF. Datos.bne.es is one of the first international initiatives to thoroughly embrace the models developed by IFLA, such as the FR models FRBR (Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records), FRAD (Functional Requirements for Authority Data), FRSAD (Functional Requirements for Subject Authority Data), and ISBD (International Standard for Bibliographic Description). FRBR has been used as a reference model and as a data model because it provides a comprehensive and organized description of the bibliographic universe, allowing the gathering of useful data and navigation. Entities, relationships and properties have been written in RDF using the RDF vocabularies taken from IFLA; thus FR ontologies have been used to describe Persons, Corporate Bodies, Works and Expressions, and ISBD properties for Manifestations. All these vocabularies are now available at Open Metadata Registry (OMR), with the status of published. Additionally, in cooperation with IFLA, labels have been translated to Spanish. MARC21 bibliographic and authority files have been tested and mapped to the classes and properties at OMR. The following mappings were carried out:
  • A mapping to determine, given a field tag and a certain subfield combination, to which FRBR entity it is related (Person, Corporate Body, Work, Expression). This mapping was applied to authority files.
  • A mapping to establish relationships between entities.
  • A mapping to determine, given a field/subfield combination, to which property it can be mapped. Authority files were mapped to FR vocabularies, whereas bibliographic files were mapped to ISBD vocabulary. A number of properties from other vocabularies were also used.
The aforementioned mappings will be soon available to the library community and thus the BNE would like to contribute to the discussion of mapping MARC records to RDF; in addition, other libraries willing to transform their MARC records into RDF will be able to reuse such mappings.

Almost 7 million records transformed under an open license

Approximately 2.4 million bibliographic records have been transformed into RDF. They are modern and ancient monographies, sound-recordings and musical scores. Besides, 4 million authority records of persons, corporate names, uniform titles and subjects have been transformed. All of them belong to the bibliographic and authority catalogues of the BNE stored in MARC 21 format. As for the data transformation, the MARImbA (MARc mappIngs and rdf generAtor) tool has been developed and used. MARiMbA is a tool for librarians, whose goal is to support the entire process of generating RDF from MARC21 records. This tool allows using any vocabulary (in this case ISBD and FR family) and simplifies the process of assigning correspondences between RDFS/OWL vocabularies and MARC 21. As a result of this process, about 58 million triples have been generated in Spanish. These triples are high quality data with an important cultural value that substantially increases the presence of the Spanish language in the data cloud. Once the data were described with IFLA models, and the bibliographic and authorities catalogues were generated in RDF, the following step was to connect these data with other existing knowledge RDF databases included in the Linking Open Data initiative. Thus, the data of the BNE are now linked or connected with data from other international data source through VIAF, the Virtual International Authority File. The type of licence applied to the data is CC0 (Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication), a completely open licence aimed at promoting data reuse. With this project, the BNE adheres to the Spanish Public Sector’s Commitment to openness and data reuse, as established in the Royal Decree 1495/ 2011 of 24 October, (Real Decreto 1495/2011, de 24 de octubre) on reusing information in the public sector, and also acknowledges the proposals of the CENL (Conference of European National Librarians).

Future steps

In the short term, the next steps to carry out include
  • Migration of a larger set of catalogue records.
  • Improvement of the quality and granularity of both the transformed entities and the relationships between them.
  • Establishment of new links to other interesting datasets.
  • Development of a human-friendly visualization tool.
  • SKOSification of subject headings.

Team

From BNE: Ana Manchado, Mar Hernández Agustí, Fernando Monzón, Pilar Tejero López, Ana Manero García, Marina Jiménez Piano, Ricardo Santos Muñoz and Elena Escolano. From UPM: Asunción Gómez-Pérez, Elena Montiel-Ponsoda, Boris Villazón-Terrazas and Daniel Vila-Suero.

LOD at Bibliothèque nationale de France

- September 21, 2011 in Data, lod-lam, Semantic Web

Romain Wenz of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) informed me via email about this pleasant development: The BnF’s Linked Data service now is a Linked Open Data service! The BnF LOD service is in the first instance limited to classical authors and currently comprises approximately 1,600 authors and nearly 4,000 works described in 1.4 million RDF triples. See also the accompanying entry on the Data hub. More information about data.bnf.fr can be found in this use case for the W3C Linked Library Data Incubator Group. On http://data.bnf.fr/semanticweb one can find a link to a full dump of the RDF data. The corresponding license text reads: ” La réutilisation des données exposées en format RDF est libre et gratuite sous réserve du respect de la législation en vigueur et du maintien de la mention de source “Bibliothèque nationale de France” auprès des données. L’utilisateur peut les adapter ou les modifier, à condition d’en informer clairement les tiers et de ne pas en dénaturer le sens.” This looks like an attribution license to me (my French is not the best!), but it is not made clear – neither on the webpage nor in the LICENCE.txt accompanying the dump – how the requirement of attribution should be met in practice. (The BnF might learn in this respect from New Zealand National Library’s approach.) It also says that data in other formats than RDF is still licensed under a non-commercial license: “La réutilisation des données exposées dans un autre format est soumise aux conditions suivantes :
  • la réutilisation non commerciale de ces données est libre et gratuite dans le respect de la législation en vigueur et notamment du maintien de la mention de source “Bibliothèque nationale de France” auprès des données. L’utilisateur peut les adapter ou les modifier, à condition d’en informer clairement les tiers et de ne pas en dénaturer le sens.

  • la réutilisation commerciale de ces contenus est payante et fait l’objet d’une licence. Est entendue par réutilisation commerciale l’acquisition des données en vue de l’élaboration d’un produit ou d’un service destiné à être mis à disposition de tiers à titre onéreux, ou à titre gratuit mais avec une finalité commerciale. Cliquer ici pour accéder aux tarifs et à la licence.”

Collections in Bibliographica: unsorted information is not information

- June 12, 2011 in inf11, jisc, JISC OpenBib, jiscEXPO, jiscopenbib, News, OKFN Openbiblio, progressPosts, Semantic Web, WIN

Collections are the first feature aimed for our users participation at Bibliographica. The collections are lists of books users can create and share with others, and they are one of the basic features of Bibliographica as Jonathan Gray pointed out already:
lists of publications are an absolutely critical part of scholarship. They articulate the contours of a body of knowledge, and define the scope and focus of scholarly enquiry in a given domain. Furthermore such lists are always changing.
Details of use They are accessible via the collections link on the top menu of the website. To create collections you must be logged in. You may login on http://bibliographica.org/account/login with an openID Once logged in, every time you open a book page (i.e. http://bnb.bibliographica.org/entry/GB6502067 ) you will see at your right the Collections menu, where you can choose between creating a new collection with that work, or adding the work to an already existing collection. If you have created some collections you can always access them through the menu and they are also going to appear in your account page For removing a book from one collection, you can click remove in the collection listing of the sidebar. Collections screencast