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A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1788)

- January 18, 2018 in dictionary, slang

A compendium of slang from the sordid streets of after-hours Georgian London, compiled by Francis Grose.

A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1788)

- January 18, 2018 in dictionary, slang

A compendium of slang from the sordid streets of after-hours Georgian London, compiled by Francis Grose.

A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1788)

- January 18, 2018 in dictionary, slang

A compendium of slang from the sordid streets of after-hours Georgian London, compiled by Francis Grose.

A Dictionary of Victorian Slang (1909)

- January 29, 2013 in collections, dictionary, language, phrase, slang, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Miscellaneous, Texts: Non-fiction, victorian, words

Passing English of the Victorian era, a dictionary of heterodox English, slang and phrase, by J. Redding Ware; 1909; Routledge, London. Passing English of the Victorian era, a dictionary of heterodox English, slang and phrase is complied and written by James Redding Ware, the pseudonym of Andrew Forrester the British writer who created one of the first female detectives in literary history in his book The Female Detective (1863). In this posthumously published volume Forrester turns his attention to the world of Victorian slang, in particular that found in the city of London. From the Preface: HERE is a numerically weak collection of instances of ‘Passing English’. It may be hoped that there are errors on every page, and also that no entry is ‘quite too dull’. Thousands of words and phrases in existence in 1870 have drifted away, or changed their forms, or been absorbed, while as many have been added or are being added. ‘Passing English’ ripples from countless sources, forming a river of new language which has its tide and its ebb, while its current brings down new ideas and carries away those that have dribbled out of fashion. Not only is ‘Passing English’ general ; it [...]