You are browsing the archive for social.

[Video] Open Science for Bio-Hackers

- March 23, 2015 in ASAPOnAir, Livestream, Planet, social

Our first Google Hangout On Air about Open Science for Bio-Hackers was real fun – see our video and slides. As mentioned earlier, the Montréal Biolab bricobio invited us to “Dendriting – Interviews with biohackers from around the world“. Content is on Youtube, Slideshare and GitHub.

openscienceASAP goes live on the web

- March 12, 2015 in Livestream, Planet, social

For our first video-broadcast, we meet the bricobio DIY-Biolab from Montréal live on the web, where Stefan Kasberger will present the idea and some applications of Open Science for bio-hackers. bricobio invited us to their series “Dendriting – Interviews with biohackers from around the world” to share the idea of Open Science to the biohackers […]

Federate social network for repairman

- June 24, 2012 in network, repair, social

Repairman resources Social network P2P filesharing, chat, spaces Federate content

Idea: Web Orchestration Language

- November 18, 2011 in data-flow, language, mashup, orchestration, social

I am sharing a long term vision for a product/service related to open data. Its name is Egont (Negation of Ego). If you're interested part II of the idea is at: Egont Part II Inspiration Human curiosity goes beyond limited web applications, recommendation systems and search engines. People collect lists of things on the web. Things like music playlists, movie rankings or visited places are populating our web culture, but this information is spread out in different places and we need search engines, social networks, and recommendation systems to leverage it. The real-time web also offers transformation opportunities which are only limited by the imagination. How can we adjust all this information to our personal or organizational needs? The semantic web could play an important role here, but the web is not organized semantically yet. However, it is possible today to give people tools to manipulate information at a personal and social level. Spreadsheets have hundreds of functions which are used by people with limited computer and mathematical skills. What if we could transform information in a similar way? What if a new stimuli, like a new tweet or a new ranked movie could trigger a cascade of processes? People and organizations are sharing a record amount of data, but current web platforms tightly dictate the limits to its use. For example Twitter’s API has very small call rates for the general public. Most Twitter applications cannot retrieve more than one or two degrees of a user’s social network without working around these API limitations. Examples of API limitations abound, undermining the opportunities to leverage data potentials. The inspiration for Egont was come from the idea of a social operating system. People do not only share data, they also share data transformations. Egont is a platform for writing simple code snippets, while allowing others to reuse them to extract new information. It is a shared pipeline which is focused on connecting people’s data and processes. It can be thought of as a living operating system: when a state changes, the dependant processes are recalculated. Although Egont has clear security controls it’s primarily oriented to data that can be shared, even providing tools for exporting information to be analyzed offline. The shift is from a perspective where users accept platforms applications, to a perspective where users do not only generate data but also processes. Users and third parties will be free to write new functions to extend Egont’s capabilities.

Idea: Web Orchestration Language

- November 18, 2011 in data-flow, language, mashup, orchestration, social

I am sharing a long term vision for a product/service related to open data. Its name is Egont (Negation of Ego). If you're interested part II of the idea is at: Egont Part II Inspiration Human curiosity goes beyond limited web applications, recommendation systems and search engines. People collect lists of things on the web. Things like music playlists, movie rankings or visited places are populating our web culture, but this information is spread out in different places and we need search engines, social networks, and recommendation systems to leverage it. The real-time web also offers transformation opportunities which are only limited by the imagination. How can we adjust all this information to our personal or organizational needs? The semantic web could play an important role here, but the web is not organized semantically yet. However, it is possible today to give people tools to manipulate information at a personal and social level. Spreadsheets have hundreds of functions which are used by people with limited computer and mathematical skills. What if we could transform information in a similar way? What if a new stimuli, like a new tweet or a new ranked movie could trigger a cascade of processes? People and organizations are sharing a record amount of data, but current web platforms tightly dictate the limits to its use. For example Twitter’s API has very small call rates for the general public. Most Twitter applications cannot retrieve more than one or two degrees of a user’s social network without working around these API limitations. Examples of API limitations abound, undermining the opportunities to leverage data potentials. The inspiration for Egont was come from the idea of a social operating system. People do not only share data, they also share data transformations. Egont is a platform for writing simple code snippets, while allowing others to reuse them to extract new information. It is a shared pipeline which is focused on connecting people’s data and processes. It can be thought of as a living operating system: when a state changes, the dependant processes are recalculated. Although Egont has clear security controls it’s primarily oriented to data that can be shared, even providing tools for exporting information to be analyzed offline. The shift is from a perspective where users accept platforms applications, to a perspective where users do not only generate data but also processes. Users and third parties will be free to write new functions to extend Egont’s capabilities.

AuthorClaim

- February 17, 2011 in Bibliographic, data-collection, openbiblio-challenge, openservice, social

AuthorClaim is a scholarly service which provides for professionals and students involved in the academic community the ability to both claim authorship over published works, as well as (and most significantly) the ability to obtain statistics as to your rankings with your coauthors, and with other authors within the network. Open access repositories are used to create the bibliographic records for each document, similar in structure to services such as RePEc (http://repec.org) and arXiv (http://www.arxiv.org) . This service ultimately aims to provide for both the registered and the unregistered user the ability to visualize one's unique position and relationship with other individuals throughout the network. More information can be found at the following page: http://authorclaim.org/about Details of our integration of the IUCR collection: http://authorclaim.org/collections/iucr Information about our current collections can be found here: http://authorclaim.org/collections And registration (our service is, of course, entirely free of charge), can be found on the index page: http://authorclaim.org/

AuthorProfile

- February 17, 2011 in Bibliographic, data-collection, openbiblio-challenge, openservice, social

Objective The overall objective is to invert bibliographic data from its traditional format where each record describes a document. We want to create to a CV-style format that has authors as the heading and the documents written by the author underneath it. This allows for a navigation of the bibliographical space by author. It also prepare for performance evaluation of authors. Sources There are two sources. One is a set of simple document data from the OKFN sponsored 3lib project. 3lib. These data are de facto open because they contain only factual descriptions of documents, titles, author names, identifiers. The document data describe scientific articles and preprint. The other source is a set of author profiles that are openly available from AuthorClaim. Method Authors are referenced in bibliographic information by names. Names are ambiguous. There are many ways to write the name of a single person. We call these "name expressions". Several persons may share valid name expressions. Since names don't identify authors, AuthorProfile can not do a reliable job. The AuthorClaim project allows authors to claim documents. Only a very small part of documents are subject to author claims at this time. These are the people for authoritative publication lists are available. For the others we have to use name expressions. We look at bibliographic data records containing such author name expressions, and create files, one for each author name expression. We call this process "auversion". The system will have list of author pages as top-entry navigation. Author pages can only be constructed for AuthorClaim registrants. However most AuthorClaim registrants have coauthors, and most of these are not yet registered. These non-registered co-authors then provide entry points to author name expressions, etc. Thus a substantial part of "auverted" bibliographic data can be linked from the authors. System In addition to navigating a set of authors (not implemented yet), we plan two navigational features. First, we want to link from an "auverted" author name page to the closest registered. By "closest" we mean by shortest intermediate author name expression path through co-authorship. This is partly implemented on our test set system. We call this "vertical integration". Second, we want to provide links between related author name expression. Assume for example, we have the author name J. Griffin, but we also have James Griffin, we want to create a link from J. Griffin author name expression to James Griffin author name expression. We want to do a similar thing for diacritics, linking from expressions with diacritics to those without and back. We links between author name expressions that may refer to the same person as "horizontal integration". Current state A debugging/testing demonstrator of the system is available here. Eligibility The 3lib dataset includes the IUCR data from the JISC funded open bibliography project. However since the data is very small, it is not likely to be seen in the actual demonstrator that we have running.