You are browsing the archive for Texts: Childrens.

Nursery Lessons in Words of One Syllable (1838)

- August 1, 2013 in California Digital Library, children, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Internet Archive, nursery, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Picturebooks, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide, words

Nursery Lessons in Words of One Syllable; 1838; Darton and Harvey, London. A charming little illustrated book for young readers, consisting entirely of words of one syllable. Housed at: Internet Archive | From: California Digital Library Found via: Tiffany Johnson Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: PDF | Kindle | EPUB | Torrent HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription! Name: E-mail:

The Blossoms of Morality (1806)

- June 13, 2013 in California Digital Library, children, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, instruction, Internet Archive, morality, texts, Texts: 18th, Texts: 19th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Fiction, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide, vice

The Blossoms of Morality intended for the amusement and instruction of young ladies and gentlemen by the editor of The looking-glass for the mind ; with forty-seven cuts ; designed and engraved by I. Bewick.; 4th edition, 1806; Printed for J. Harris in London. As the subtitle proclaims, this book originally published in the late 18th century is “intended for the amusement and instruction of young ladies and gentlemen”. The introduction is presumably one into the moral ridden world of adults. A vast array of different little stories are told for the purpose, including the excellently titled “Juvenile tyranny conquered” and “The melancholy effects of pride”. Each is told in a brilliantly earnest yet flowery style, for example, the first sentence of the first story, “Ernestus and Fragilus”, reads: The faint glimmerings of the pale-faced moon on the troubled billows of the ocean are not so fleeting and inconstant as the fortune and condition of human life. 47 beautiful illustrations by I. Bewick adorn it throughout. Housed at: Internet Archive | From: California Digital Library Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: PDF | Kindle | EPUB | Torrent HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public [...]

The Baby’s Own Aesop (1908)

- May 30, 2013 in aesop's fables, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Internet Archive, limericks, New York Public Library Picture Collection, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: 20th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Picturebooks, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide, walter crane

The Baby’s own Aesop: being the fables condensed in rhyme with portable morals pictorially pointed by Walter Crane; 1908; F. Warne, New York. Walter Crane’s beautifully illustrated version of Aesop’s fables, shortened and put into limericks for the younger reader and first published in 1887. Aesop’s Fables or the Aesopica is a collection of fables credited to Aesop, a slave and story-teller believed to have lived in ancient Greece between 620 and 560 BCE. Apollonius of Tyana, a 1st-century CE philosopher, is recorded as having said about Aesop: … like those who dine well off the plainest dishes, he made use of humble incidents to teach great truths, and after serving up a story he adds to it the advice to do a thing or not to do it. Then, too, he was really more attached to truth than the poets are; for the latter do violence to their own stories in order to make them probable; but he by announcing a story which everyone knows not to be true, told the truth by the very fact that he did not claim to be relating real events. (Wikipedia) The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the New [...]

The Accidents of Youth (1819)

- April 15, 2013 in accidents, collections, danger, engravings, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Fiction, Texts: Picturebooks, youth

The Accidents of Youth, consisting of short histories, calculated to improve the moral conduct of children, and warn them of the many dangers to which they are exposed : illustrated by engravings; 1819; Jas. W. and Chas. Adlard, London. Through a series of short stories and wonderful engravings, this book is aimed at keeping young people out of trouble and “calculated to improve [their] moral conduct”. As the author declares in his/her brilliantly earnest preface addressed to the child reader of the book: My Dear Children, The inexperience and thoughtlessness natural at your age exposes you to many dangers : I have therefore pointed out some of them in this book, which contains several instructive little histories, in which you will behold the misfortunes that arise from disobedience and want of thought. When your parents desire you not to climb upon the chairs, or touch the fire, or play with knives, or pins, it is not because they wish to prevent you amusing yourselves ; they are only anxious to keep you from harm. If you were allowed to do whatever you pleased, many accidents would happen through your own indiscretion : for instance, when climbing on the furniture you [...]

Endless Amusement (1820)

- February 19, 2013 in acoustics, arithmetic, card tricks, chemistry, collections, electricity, experiments, fireworks, hydraulics, hydrostatics, juvenile, magnetism, mechanics, optics, pyrotechnics, Science, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Miscellaneous, Texts: Non-fiction, Texts: Science, tricks

Endless Amusement, a collection of nearly 400 entertaining experiments in various branches of science, including acoustics, arithmetic, chemistry, electricity, hydraulics, hydrostatics, magnetism, mechanics, optics, wonders of the air pump, all the popular tricks and changes of the cards, &c., &c., &c.; 1820; Thorp and Burch, and Thomas Boys, London. As it states on the title page, a collection of “nearly 400 entertaining experiments in various branches of science, including acoustics, arithmetic, chemistry, electricity, hydraulics, hydrostatics, magnetism, mechanics, optics, wonders of the air pump, all the popular tricks and changes of the cards, &c., &c., &c. : to which is added, A complete system of pyrotechny, or, The art of making fireworks: the whole so clearly explained, as to be within the reach of the most limited capacity”. The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the California Digital Library. DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable public good, and to curate and showcase the most interesting out-of-copyright works on the web. SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to [...]

The Nine Lives of a Cat (1860)

- January 10, 2013 in cats, collections, nine lives, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Fiction, Texts: Picturebooks

The Nine Lives of a Cat – a Tale of Wonder, by Charles Bennett; 1860; Griffith and Farran, London. Beautifully illustrated (though perhaps not so well rhymed!) tale of the cat with nine lives. From the preface: This tale of wonder is told for children; with which view, it has been carefully designed and very nicely printed. For some time past, it has arrived at the dignity of a popular Nursery Tale in the Author’s family ; and it is hoped it will merit the same good fortune elsewhere. It will be worth while explaining, that the circle in each page is made to represent some object in connection with the story ; and, that as some of them have proved rather puzzling, to Juvenile admirers has been left the task of ” finding them out.” The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the California Digital Library. Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

The Hole Book (1908)

- August 31, 2012 in children's book, non-article, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Fiction, Texts: Picturebooks


The Hole Book, by Peter Newell; 1908; Harper & Brothers, New York.

While fooling with a gun, Tom Potts shoots a bullet that seems to be unstoppable. A literal hole on each page traces the bullet’s path as it wreaks havoc across various scenes until it meets its match in a particularly sturdy cake. A native of McDonough County, Illinois, Newell built a reputation in the 1880s and 1890s for his humorous drawings and poems, which appeared in Harper’s Weekly, Harper’s Bazaar, Scribner’s Magazine, The Saturday Evening Post, Judge, and other publications. He later wrote and illustrated several popular children’s books, such as Topsys and Turvys (1893), a collection of poems and images which could be viewed upside-down or right-side-up; The Hole Book (1908), featured above; and The Slant Book (1910), which took the shape of a rhomboid and told the story of a baby carriage careening down a hill. (Wikipedia)

The book is housed at the Internet Archive, donated by The New York Public Library.

(Hat tip to BibliOdyssey where we first learnt of Peter Newell, and to Ptak Science Books blog).










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Leo Tolstoy´s Fables for Children (1904)

- August 7, 2012 in children, fables, fairytales, non-article, stories, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction, tolstoy


Fables for children, stories for children, natural science stories, popular education, decembrists, moral tales, by Count Lev N. Tolstoy, translated from the original Russian and edited by Leo Wiener; 1904; Dana Estes & Co., Boston.

As well as writing such lengthy literary classics as Anna Karenina and War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy turned his hand to writing stories for younger readers. Most of the works in the collection above, translated here by Leo Wiener, had their seed in primers which Tolstoy wrote for the school which he established in 1849 for peasant children at his country estate, Yasnaya Polyana (Clear Glades). In the huge variety of tales – through a host of kings, hermits, peasants and talking animals – he expounds his clear vision for a more human and socially just society.

The book is housed on the Internet Archive, donated by the New York Public Library.










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Jack and Jill and old Dame Gill (1806)

- July 31, 2012 in non-article, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Picturebooks


Jack and Jill and old Dame Gill, author/illustrator unknown; 1806; J. Aldis, London.

Extended version of the famous nursery rhyme in which, in addition to fetching some water, Jack and Jill get into various scrapes with animals, swings, see-saws, and the ever-chastising Old Dame Gill. The illustrator goes uncredited in the book, though the back page is dedicated to a special rhyme advertising the booksellers/publishers J.Aldis: “Dame Gill had been to Aldis / To buy them all books / You may see how they are pleased / by the smiles in their looks / Now if you are good and deserving regard / This book full of pictures shall be your reward.”

The book is housed at the Internet Archive, donated by the California Digital Library.










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What to draw and how to draw it (1913)

- July 4, 2012 in animation, drawing, e.g. lutz, non-article, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Miscellaneous, Texts: Non-fiction, Texts: Picturebooks, walt disney



What to draw and how to draw it, by E.G. Lutz; 1913; Dodd & Mead, New York.


Drawing made easy a helpful book for young artists; the way to begin and finish your sketches, clearly shown step by step, by E. G. Lutz; 1921; C. Scribner’s Sons, New York.

A cartoon drawing masterclass from Edwin G. Lutz, the man who inspired Walt Disney to animation fame. A 19 year old Walt is said to have discovered Lutz’s book Animated Cartoons: How They Are Made, Their Origin and Development, while he was working at the Kansas City Film Ad Company. From the book, he learned the many tricks of the trade from cycles to how to hold and repeat drawings. Little is known about Lutz. As well as writing numerous books on the art of drawing and animation, Lutz made his living creating cartoons, typically anthropomorphic, for newspapers such as the New York Herald and Philadelphia Press. His most frequent work was illustrating for the “Book of Magic”, which was the special children’s section of the Seattle Post Intelligencer, for which he drew many cartoons and invented children’s craft activities often involving optical tricks like the piece below. (Read more here)



For more on how to animate also check out John Robert McCrory’s How to draw for the movies (1918)










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