You are browsing the archive for Texts: Fairytales.

The Chinese Fairy Book (1921)

- November 28, 2013 in California Digital Library, china, chinese fairy tales, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, fairy tales, fairytales, Internet Archive, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Fairytales, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide

A book compiling seventy-four traditional Chinese folk takes, making, as the translator notes, "probably the most comprehensive and varied collection of oriental fairy tales ever made available for American readers".

Croatian Tales of Long Ago (1922)

- February 7, 2013 in collections, croatia, fairytales, folktales, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction

Croatian Tales of Long Ago, by Ivana Brlić-Mažuranić, translated by F. S. Copeland; 1922; Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. A seminal collection of short stories by the acclaimed children’s author Ivana Brlić-Mažuranić originally published in 1916 in Zagreb by the Matica Hrvatska publishing house. The collection is considered her masterpiece and it features a series of newly written fairy tales heavily inspired by motifs taken from ancient Slavic mythology of pre-Christian Croatia. Due to this way of combining original fantasy plots with folk mythology, Brlić-Mažuranić’s writing style has been compared by literary critics to Hans Christian Andersen and J. R. R. Tolkien. Indeed, the 1922 English translation by F.S. Copeland was published in London by George Allen & Unwin, the same company which would go onto publish Tolkien’s The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings trilogy. The illustrations in this 1922 edition are by Croatian artist Vladimir Kirin. (Wikipedia) The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the Boston Public Library. Hat-tip to Pinterest user Pensive Blackbird. DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote [...]

Illuminated version of Lord Tennyson’s Morte d’Arthur (1912)

- October 25, 2012 in collections, king arthur, tennyson, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction, Texts: Picturebooks, Texts: Poetry, thomas malory

Morte d’Arthur, a poem by Alfred Tennyson, written out and illuminated by Alberto Sangorski; 1912; Reproduced by the Graphic Engraving Co. for Chatto & Windus, London. Alfred Lord Tennyson’s Morte d’Arthur, written as early as the spring of 1835, was a retelling of the third, fourth and fifth chapters of the twenty-first book of Malory’s Romance about the legendary King Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot, and the Knights of the Round Table. Tennyson later would incorporate a much extended and altered version of the poem into his The Idylls of the King, as the last section titled ‘The Passing of Arthur’. The illuminator Alberto Sangorski (1862-1932) was late to the world of calligraphy, at the age of 43 beginning to work for his younger brother Francis in the famous Sangorski and Sutcliffe bookbinding firm. One of his greatest achievements was a unique jewel bound version of Omar Khayyám’s Rubáiyát, now referred to as ‘the Great Omar,’ which never reached the American collector who commissioned it as it was sent across on the ill fated Titanic in 1912. The book is housed at the Internet Archive, donated by the University of Toronto. Hat-tip to Pinterest user Nancy Cooper. Sign up to get our [...]

Russian Fairytales (1915)

- October 2, 2012 in collections, fairytales, folktales, russia, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Fairytales

Russian fairy tales from the Russian of Polevoi, by R. Nisbet Bain, illustrated by Noel L. Nisbet; 1915; Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. A collection of Russian fairytales translated from the Russian of Nikolai Polevoy, a notable editor, writer, translator in the early 19th century. The translations were made by Robert Nisbet Bain, a British historian who worked for the British Museum, and a polyglot who could reportedly speak over twenty languages fluently. He famously taught himself Hungarian in order that he could read the works of Mór Jókai in the original after first reading him in German, going on to become the most prolific translator into English from Hungarian in the nineteenth century. The book is housed at the Internet Archive, donated by the Boston Public Library. Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

Leo Tolstoy´s Fables for Children (1904)

- August 7, 2012 in children, fables, fairytales, non-article, stories, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction, tolstoy


Fables for children, stories for children, natural science stories, popular education, decembrists, moral tales, by Count Lev N. Tolstoy, translated from the original Russian and edited by Leo Wiener; 1904; Dana Estes & Co., Boston.

As well as writing such lengthy literary classics as Anna Karenina and War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy turned his hand to writing stories for younger readers. Most of the works in the collection above, translated here by Leo Wiener, had their seed in primers which Tolstoy wrote for the school which he established in 1849 for peasant children at his country estate, Yasnaya Polyana (Clear Glades). In the huge variety of tales – through a host of kings, hermits, peasants and talking animals – he expounds his clear vision for a more human and socially just society.

The book is housed on the Internet Archive, donated by the New York Public Library.










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Navaho Legends (1897)

- June 28, 2012 in american indian, folklore, folktales, legends, myths, native americans, navaho, non-article, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction

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Navaho Legends, edited by G.E. Stechert; 1897; American Folk-Lore Society, New York

Book from the American Folk-Lore Society compiling Navaho myths and legends and including also a lengthy introduction on the history, beliefs and customs of the Navaho people.

I. THE STORY OF THE EMERGENCE.

136. At To‘bIllhaskI’di (in the middle of the first world), white arose in the east, and they regarded it as day there, they say ; blue rose in the south, and still it was day to them, and they moved around ; yellow rose in the west and showed that evening had come ; then dark arose in the north, and they lay down and slept.

137. At To‘bIllhaskI’di water flowed out (from a central source) in different directions ; one stream flowed to the east, another to the south, and another to the west. There were dwelling-places on the border of the stream that flowed to the east, on that which flowed to the south, and on that which flowed to the west also.


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    The Faerie Queene (1596)

    - May 27, 2012 in edmund spenser, faerie queene, non-article, texts, Texts: 16th and older, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction, Texts: Poetry

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    The Faerie Queene – Disposed into twelue bookes, fashioning XII. morall vertues, by Edmund Spenser; 1596; William Ponsonbie, London.

    Original 1596 first edition of the second part to Edmund Spenser’s epic poem The Faerie Queene – disposed into twelue bookes, fashioning XII. morall vertues – a book published, according to Spenser, to “fashion a gentleman or noble person in virtuous and gentle discipline.” It is a highly allegorical tale, the adventures of several medieval knights, dragons, damsels in distress, etc., in a mythical “Faerie land” ruled by the Faerie Queene, all used to explore moral issues and what makes for a life of virtue under the reign of his ‘Queene’ Elizabeth. The language of his poetry is purposely archaic, reminiscent of earlier works such as The Canterbury Tales of Geoffrey Chaucer and Il Canzoniere of Francesco Petrarca, whom Spenser greatly admired. He originally indicated that he intended the poem to be twelve books long, so the version of the poem we have today is incomplete.

    Read the first 3 books in Part 1 in this later (and slightly more legible!) edition from 1859.

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    A Floral Fantasy in an Old English Garden (1899)

    - May 10, 2012 in floral, flowers, garden, non-article, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction, Texts: Miscellaneous, Texts: Picturebooks, Texts: Poetry, walter crane


    A Floral Fantasy in an Old English Garden, set forth in verses & coloured designs, by Walter Crane; 1899; Harper, London

    Walter Crane (1845–1915) is considered to be the most prolific and influential children’s book creator of his generation and, along with Randolph Caldecott and Kate Greenaway, one of the strongest contributors to the child’s nursery motif that the genre of English children’s illustrated literature would exhibit in its developmental stages in the latter 19th century. His work featured some of the more colourful and detailed beginnings of the child-in-the-garden motifs that would characterize many nursery rhymes and children’s stories for decades to come. (Wikipedia)

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    Aino Folktales (1888)

    - April 13, 2012 in aino, folklore, folktales, japan, non-article, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction


    Aino Folk-tales, by B.H. Chamberlain; 1888; Folk-lore Society, London.

    The Ainu (アイヌ?), also called Aynu, Aino (アイノ), and in historical texts Ezo (蝦夷), are a group of indigenous people living in Japan and Russia – thought to originate from the Jōmon-jin people whom many think might have been the first to settle North America. Historically, they spoke the Ainu language and related varieties and lived in Hokkaidō, the Kuril Islands, and much of Sakhalin. A medieval Chinese historian referred to the Ainu region as the “Land of the Hairy Men” on account of the abundance of their facial hair compared to the typical inhabitant of Japan.

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    Welsh Fairytales and Other Stories (1894)

    - April 12, 2012 in fairytales, folklore, non-article, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction, welsh fairytales


    Welsh Fairytales and Other Stories, collected and edited by P.H. Emerson; 1894; D. Nutt, London.

    Collection of stories told to the author during his stay in Anglesey during the winter of 1891-2, mostly involving fairies in some form or other, and either the finding or losing of money.

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