You are browsing the archive for Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions.

Wear Celluloid Collars and Cuffs (ca.1870)

- November 7, 2013 in Boston Public Library, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Flickr: the Commons, Images, Images-20th, Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions

A charming set of 19th Century American trade cards, advertising - via the medium of a frog and gnome-like character - collars and cuffs made of a waterproof linen (celluloid).

Auto Polo (ca.1911)

- October 3, 2013 in auto polo, cars, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Flickr: the Commons, ford, Images, Images-20th, Images-People, Images-Photography, Library of Congress, polo, sport, Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions

Four photographs depicting dramatic scenes from an "auto polo" match, a version of polo played using cars rather than horses. The sport - thought to have been invented as a publicity stunt by a Ford automobile dealer from Topeka to sell Model Ts - was popular at fairs, exhibitions and sports venues across the United States and several areas in Europe from 1911 until the late 1920s.

The Somersault Man (1923)

- July 26, 2013 in acrobatics, collections, Digital Copy: Share Alike, Films, Films: 1920s, Films: Clip, Films: Documentary, netherlands, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, Open Images, somersault, Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions

A short silent clip from a Dutch newsreel showing a man somersaulting through the streets. Housed at: Open Images | From: Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions | Digital Copy: Share Alike Download: Ogg | Mpeg4 HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription! Name: E-mail:

The First Tour de France (1903)

- July 18, 2013 in 1903, collections, cycling, Digital Copy: PD Wikimedia, dreyfuss affair, first tour de france, France, Images, Images-20th, Images-People, Images-Photography, maurice garin, sport, tour de france, Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions, Wikimedia Commons

The 2013 Tour de France marks the 100th of the event’s history, which began in 1903 (the competition was put on hold during the two world wars). Strangely, this inaugural event of 1903 had it’s origins in one of France’s greatest political scandals – the Dreyfuss Affair. In 1894 a young French artillery officer of Jewish descent, Captain Alfred Dreyfus, was convicted of high treason but then, years later, was proven to be innocent in the light of new evidence, evidence which the military attempted to suppress. The ensuing debate over Dreyfuss’ innocence, and the wider issues of anti-semitism in which it was embedded, divided the nation. One such division occurred within France’s most popular cycling magazine L’Velo, causing it to split into two when an anti-Dreyfuss contingent broke away to form L’Auto-Velo. L’Velo‘s owner won a court case forcing L’Auto-Velo to change their name, which they did, to L’Auto, a move which saw their sales subsequently plummet. In an effort to boost their waning popularity, and win back their cycling fans, L’Auto set up the Tour de France in 1903. It was a hugely successful campaign which caused their sales to increase 6-fold during and after the race and, […]

Pollen Up Close (1837)

- July 16, 2013 in Biodiversity Heritage Library, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Images, Images-19th, Images-Science, Internet Archive, Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Illustrations of various strains of pollen in extreme magnification, as featured in Ueber den Pollen (1837), a book by St. Petersburg based German pharmacist and chemist Carl Julius Fritzsche. For a key identifying each pollen type pictured see these descriptions (in German) Housed at: Internet ArchiveFrom: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign via Biodiversity Heritage Library Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions The Dartmouth Electron Microscope Facility at Dartmouth College produced this photograph showing pollen strains at similar magnifications to those shown in Fritzsche’s book (around 500 times magnification). HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter […]

Remmelin’s Anatomical ‘Flap’ Book (1667)

- June 11, 2013 in anatomy, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, flap book, Images, Images-17th, Images-Science, National Library of Medicine, remmelin, Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions

This volume is a rare edition in Dutch of the greatest of the anatomical ‘flap’ books. The work features three full-page plates with dozens of detailed anatomical illustrations superimposed so that lifting the layers shows the anatomy as it would appear during dissection. Although flaps had been used in printing before, Remmelin was the first to use them on this scale. Eight prints of the plates were produced then cut apart and pasted together to form the layers. The first authorized edition was printed in Latin in 1619 with the title Catoptrum Microcosmicum. The plates were printed in 1613, and the text without the plates was printed the following year, both without the consent of the author. Although Remmelin’s work was very popular and went through a number of editions, the format of the flaps was very delicate and not practical for the dissection room. Copies such as this one with all of the flaps intact are very rare. (Text from the NLM website) U.S. National Library of Medicine Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review [...]