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The Poetry of Victorian Science

Adam Green - July 26, 2018 in poetry, robert hunt, Science & Medicine, the poetry of science, victorian, victorian england, victorian science

In 1848, the mineralogist, pioneer of photography, and questionable poet Robert Hunt published The Poetry of Science, a hugely ambitious work that aimed to offer a survey of scientific knowledge while also communicating the metaphysical, moral, and aesthetic aspects of science to the general reader. Gregory Tate explores what the book can teach us about Victorian desires to reconcile the languages of poetry and science.

The Philosophy of Beards (1854)

Adam Green - May 8, 2018 in beards, fashion, hair, victorian

Eccentric Victorian book arguing a strong case for the universal wearing of a beard – that essential symbol of manly distinction since ancient times.

The Philosophy of Beards (1854)

Adam Green - May 8, 2018 in beards, fashion, hair, victorian

Eccentric Victorian book arguing a strong case for the universal wearing of a beard – that essential symbol of manly distinction since ancient times.

Pens and Needles: Reviving Book-Embroidery in Victorian England

Adam Green - March 21, 2018 in Art & Illustrations, arts and crafts movement, book arts, Books, embroidered book covers, embroidery, may morris, queen elizabeth, victorian, victorian england, william morris

Fashionable in the 16th and 17th century, the art of embroidering unique covers for books saw a comeback in late 19th-century England, from the middle-class drawing room to the Arts and Crafts movement. Jessica Roberson explores the bibliomania, patriotism, and issues around gender so central to the revival.

Pens and Needles: Reviving Book-Embroidery in Victorian England

Adam Green - March 21, 2018 in Art & Illustrations, arts and crafts movement, book arts, Books, embroidered book covers, embroidery, may morris, queen elizabeth, victorian, victorian england, william morris

Fashionable in the 16th and 17th century, the art of embroidering unique covers for books saw a comeback in late 19th-century England, from the middle-class drawing room to the Arts and Crafts movement. Jessica Roberson explores the bibliomania, patriotism, and issues around gender so central to the revival.

Album of Seaweed Pictures (1848)

lotta - June 14, 2016 in algae, design, seaweed, victorian

Fine specimen of a 19th-century seaweed album, in which marine algae is rendered into designs, bouquets, and even sometimes intricate little scenes.

Album of Seaweed Pictures (1848)

lotta - June 14, 2016 in algae, design, seaweed, victorian

Fine specimen of a 19th-century seaweed album, in which marine algae is rendered into designs, bouquets, and even sometimes intricate little scenes.

Album of Seaweed Pictures (1848)

lotta - June 14, 2016 in algae, design, seaweed, victorian

Fine specimen of a 19th-century seaweed album, in which marine algae is rendered into designs, bouquets, and even sometimes intricate little scenes.

The Telephonoscope (1879)

Adam Green - November 10, 2015 in edison, future history, future technologies, futurism, futurology, George du Maurier, history of the future, punch, retro-future, retrofuture, victorian, Victorian Skype, Victorian technology

An 1879 depiction of an imagined communication device which, for all intents and purposes, amounts to some kind of Victorian Skype.

The Telephonoscope (1879)

Adam Green - November 10, 2015 in edison, future history, future technologies, futurism, futurology, George du Maurier, historical predictions of the future, history of the future, punch, retro-future, retrofuture, steampunk, victorian, Victorian Skype, Victorian technology

Device imagined in a Punch cartoon from 1879, predicting the advent of video chat more than 100 years before Skype.