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Community Discussions 3

- July 13, 2012 in BibServer, Data, event, Events, JISC OpenBib, jiscopenbib2, licensing, News, OKFN Openbiblio, wp3, wp4, wp5

It has been a couple of months since the round-up on Community Discussions 2 and we have been busy! BiblioHack was a highlight for me, and last week included a meeting of many OKFN types – here’s a picture taken by Lucy Chambers for @OKFN of some team members: IMG_0351 The Discussion List has been busy too:
  • Further to David Weinbergers’s pointer that Harvard released 12 million bibliographic records with a CC0 licence, Rufus Pollock created a collection on the DataHub and added it to the Biblio section for easy of reference

  • Rufus also noticed that OCLC had issued their major release of VIAF, meaning that millions of author records are now available as Open Data (under Open Data Commons Attribution license), and updated the DataHub dataset to reflect this

  • Peter Murray-Rust noted that Nature has made its metadata Open CC0

  • David Shotton promoted the International Workshop on Contributorship and Scholarly Attribution at Harvard, and prepared a handy guide for attribution of submissions

  • Adrian Pohl circulated a call for participation for the SWIB12 “Semantic Web in Bibliotheken” (Semantic Web in Libraries) Conference in Cologne, 26-28 November this year, and hosted the monthly Working Group call

  • Lars Aronsson looked at multivolume works, asking whether the OpenLibrary can create and connect records for each volume. HathiTrust and Gallica were suggested as potential tools in collating volumes, and the barcode (containing information populated by the source library) was noted as being invaluable in processing these

  • Sam Leon explained that TEXTUS would be integrating BibSever facet view and encouraged people to have a look at the work so far; Tom Oinn highlighted the collaboration between Enriched BibJSON and TEXTUS, and explained that he would be adding a ‘TEXTUS’ field to BibJSON for this purpose

  • Sam also circulated two tools for people to test, Pundit and Korbo, which have been developed out of Digitised Manuscripts to Europeana (DM2E)

  • Jenny Molloy promoted the Open Science Hackday which took place last week – see below for a snap-shot courtesy of @OKFN:

IMG_1964 In related news, Peter Murray-Rust is continuing to advocate the cause of open data – do have a read of the latest posts on his blog to see how he’s getting on. The Open Biblio community continues to be invaluable to the Open GLAM, Heritage, Access and other groups too and I would encourage those interested in such discussions to join up at the OKFN Lists page.

BiblioHack: Day 2, part 2

- June 14, 2012 in BibServer, Data, event, Events, JISC OpenBib, jiscopenbib2, minutes, News, OKFN Openbiblio, Talks, wp1, wp2, wp3, wp4, wp5, wp6, wp7, wp8, wp9

Pens down! Or, rather, key-strokes cease! BiblioHack has drawn to a close and the results of two days’ hard labour are in:

A Bibliographic Toolkit

Utilising BibServer Peter Murray-Rust reported back on what was planned, what was done, and the overlap between the two! The priority was cleaning up the process for setting up BibServers and getting them running on different architectures. (PubCrawler was going to be run on BibServer but currently it’s not working). Yesterday’s big news was that Nature has released 30 million references or thereabouts – this furthers the cause of scholarly literature whereby we, in principle, can index records rather than just corporate organisations being able / permitted to do so. National Bibliographies have been put on BibSoup – UK (‘BL’), Germany, Spain and Sweden – with the technical problem character encodings raising its head (UTF8 solves this where used). Also, BibSoup is useful for TEXTUS so the overall ‘toolkit’ approach is reinforced! Open Access Index Emanuil Tolev presented on ACat – Academic Catalogue. The first part of an index is having things to access – so gathering about 55,000 journals was a good start! Using Elastic Search within these journals will give list of contents which will then provide lists of articles (via facet view), then other services will determine licensing / open access information (URL checks assisted in this process). The ongoing plan is to use this tool to ascertain licensing information for every single record in the world. (Link to ACat to follow). Annotation Tools Tom Oinn talked about the ideas that have come out of discussions and hacking around annotators and TEXTUS. Reading lists and citation management is a key part of what TEXTUS is intended to assist with, so the plan is for any annotation to be allowed to carry a citation – whether personal opinion or related record. Personalised lists will come out of this and TEXTUS should become a reference management tool in its own right. Keep your eye on TEXTUS for the practical applications of these ideas! Note: more detailed write-ups will appear courtesy of others, do watch the OKFN blog for this and all things open… Postscript: OKFN blog post here Huge thanks to all those who participated in the event – your ideas and enthusiasm have made this so much fun to be involved with. Also thanks to those who helped run the event, visible or behind-the-scenes, particularly Sam Leon. Here’s to the next one :-)

BiblioHack: Day 2, part 1

- June 14, 2012 in BibServer, Data, event, Events, JISC OpenBib, jiscopenbib2, minutes, News, OKFN Openbiblio, Talks, wp1, wp2, wp3, wp4, wp5, wp6, wp7, wp8, wp9

After easing into the day with breakfast and coffee, each of the 3 sub-groups gave an overview of the mini-project’s aim and fed back on the evening’s progress:
  • Peter Murray-Rust revisited the overarching theme of ‘A Bibliographic Toolkit’ and the BibServer sub-group’s specific work on adding datasets and easily deploying BibServer; Adrian Pohl followed up to explain that he would be developing a National Libraries BibServer.
  • Tom Oinn explained the Annotation Tools sub-groups’s work on developing annotation tools – ie TEXTUS – looking at adding fragments of text, with your own comments and metadata linked to it, which then forms BibSoup collections. Collating personalised references is enhanced with existing search functionality, and reading lists with annotations can refer to other texts within TEXTUS.
  • Mark MacGillivray presented the 3rd group’s work on an Open Access Index. This began with listing all the journals that can be found in the whole world, with the aim of identifying the licence of each article. They have been scraping collections (eg PubMed) and gathering journals – at the time of speaking they had around 50,000+! The aim is to enable a crowd-sourced list of every journal in the world which, using PubCrawler, should provide every single article in the world.
With just 5 hours left before stopping to gather thoughts, write-up and feedback to the rest of the group, it will be very interesting to see the result…

BiblioHack: Day 1

- June 14, 2012 in BibServer, Data, event, Events, JISC OpenBib, jiscopenbib2, licensing, lod-lam, minutes, OKFN Openbiblio, Talks, wp1, wp2, wp3, wp4, wp5, wp6, wp7, wp8, wp9

The first day of BiblioHack was a day of combinations and sub-divisions! The event attendees started the day all together, both hackers and workshop / seminar attendees, and Sam introduced the purpose of the day as follows: coders – to build tools and share ideas about things that will make our shared cultural heritage and knowledge commons more accessible and useful; non-coders – to get a crash course in what openness means for galleries, libraries, archives and museums, why it’s important and how you can begin opening up your data; everyone – to get a better idea about what other people working in your domain do and engender a better understanding between librarians, academics, curators, artists and technologists, in order to foster the creation of better, cooler tools that respond to the needs of our communities. The hackers began the day with an overview of what a hackathon is for and how it can be run, as presented by Mahendra Mahey, and followed with lightning talks as follows:
  • Talk 1 Peter Murray Rust & Ross Mounce – Content and Data Mining and a PDF extractor
  • Talk 2 Mike Jones – the m-biblio project
  • Talk 4 Ian Stuart – ORI/RJB (formerly OA-RJ)
  • Talk 5 Etienne Posthumus – Making a BibServer Parser
  • Talk 6 Emanuil Tolev – IDFind – identifying identifiers (“Feedback and real user needs won’t gather themselves”)
  • Talk 7 Mark MacGillivray – BibServer – what the project has been doing recently, how that ties into the open access index idea.
  • Talk 8 Tom Oinn – TEXTUS
  • Talk 9 Simone Fonda – Pundit – collaborative semantic annotations of texts (Semantic Web-related tool)
  • Talk 10 Ian Stuart – The basics of Linked Data
We decided we wanted to work as a community, using our different skills towards one overarching goal, rather than breaking into smaller groups with separate agendas. We formed the central idea of an ‘open bibliographic tool-kit’ and people identified three main areas to hack around, playing to their skills and interests:
  • Utilising BibServer – adding datasets and using PubCrawler
  • Creating an Open Access Index
  • Developing annotation tools
At this point we all broke for lunch, and the workshoppers and hackers mingled together. As hoped, conversations sprung up between people from the two different groups and it was great to see suggestions arising from shared ideas and applications of one group being explained to the theories of the other. We re-grouped and the workshop continued until 16.00 – see here for Tim Hodson’s excellent write-up of the event and talks given – when the hackers were joined by some who attended the workshop. Each group gave a quick update on status, to try to persuade the new additions to the group to join their particular work-flow, and each group grew in number. After more hushed discussions and typing, the day finished with a talk from Tara Taubman about her background in the legalities of online security and IP, and we went for dinner. Hacking continued afterwards and we celebrated a hard day’s work down the pub, lookong forward to what was to come. Day 2 to follow…

BiblioHack Meet-up

- June 13, 2012 in event, Events, JISC OpenBib, jiscopenbib2, OKFN Openbiblio, wp3, wp4

I’ve been quiet on this blog lately, but it’s in the same way a duck looks still when swimming: things may look peaceful but there is much activity going on beneath the surface! The Open Biblio crowd have been busy on the discussion List (link to follow) and the BiblioHack organisers have been preparing for this week’s events, which kicked off with a Meet-up last night. The pre-BiblioHack Meet-up was designed to be an informal opportunity for those involved in the events to put names to faces and start up discussions; it was also open to anyone who wanted to come along to find out more about open data and the OKFN’s Working Groups including Open GLAM, and projects such as DM2E as well as Open Biblio. With no formal agenda, we started up conversations as the mood took us – this covered legalities of openness in relation to IP, licensing and open access, annotation, cat-sitting and the Blues. In a nod to the more ‘usual’ OKFN #OpenData meet-ups, we went around the room to introduce ourselves (trying to explain our interests in only 3 words was challenging…) which prompted some people to cross the room in a purposeful fashion to intercept someone they hadn’t spoken to by that point. I really enjoyed meeting the people with whom I’d be spending the next two days, so thanks to all those who came along, for their interesting ideas and suggestions, and huge thanks to Sam Leon for arranging the tasty food and drinks at C4CC and for facilitating the evening.

Hackathon alert: BiblioHack!

- May 9, 2012 in event, Events, JISC OpenBib, jiscopenbib2, News, OKFN Openbiblio, wp4

This is cross-posted from the OKFN blog The Open Knowledge Foundation’s Open Biblio group, and Working Group on Open Data in Cultural Heritage, along with DevCSI, present BiblioHack: an open Hackathon to kick-start the summer months. From Wednesday 13th – Thursday 14th June, we’ll be meeting at Queen Mary, University of London, East London, and any budding hackers are welcome, along with anyone interested in opening up metadata and the open cause – this free event aims to bring together software developers, project managers, librarians and experts in the area of Open Bibliographic Data. A workshop will run alongside the coding on the 13th, and a meet-up on the evening of the 12th is open to all whether you’re attending the Hackathon or not.

What is BiblioHack?

BiblioHack will be two days of hacking and sharing ideas about open bibliographic metadata. There will be opportunities to hack on open bibliographic datasets and experiment with new prototypes and tools. The focus will be on building things and improving existing systems that enable people and institutions to get the most of bibliographic data. If you’re a non-coder there are sessions for you too. We will be running a hands-on workshop addressing the technical aspects to opening up cultural heritage data looking at best of breed open source tools for doing that, preparing your data for a hackathon and the best standards for storing and exposing your data to make it more easily re-used.

When and where?

  • The main hackathon will take place over two days between 13th and 14th June at Queen Mary University of London
  • On the morning of the 13th June we’ll be running the workshop addressed at the technical challenges to opening up metadata. So for those unable to participate in the hack due to time constraints or lack of coding know how – this is for you!
  • On the 12th June – Tuesday evening (details TBC but will be a pub in central / east London!) – we’ll also be hosting a meet-up for anyone attending the hack and open data more generally. Whether it’s open bibliographic data, spending or government data that floats your boat all tribes are welcome!

Who is organising the event?

Who else is involved?

We’ve already lined up a whole host of speakers and groups who’ll be attending both the hack and the workshop. The list so far includes UK Discovery, CKAN, Europeana, Total Impact, Neontribe, The British Library with many more to be added in the coming days…

You’re giving your time and expertise – what do you get if you attend the whole hack?

  • Accommodation at QMUL overnight on the 13th
  • Food and drink across the 3 days
  • The chance to work with experts in their fields
  • Admiration and respect from your peers
  • We could expound at length, but… go on, you know you want to (it’s free!)

How can I sign up?

  • Register here for the 2 day hack
  • Register here for workshop only
  • Register here for Meet-up only
Please note, if you wish to attend all 3 events you should sign up for each, and the Workshop will run in parallel with the hacking on the morning of the 13th.

More questions?

Contact Naomi Lillie on admin [@] okfn.org. See you there!

BiblioHack hackathon registration form

- May 9, 2012 in event, Events, JISC OpenBib, jiscopenbib2, OKFN Openbiblio, wp3, wp4

To register for BiblioHack, the 2-day hackathon event on 13th-14th June 2012, please submit your details using the form below and ensure you scroll down to complete all fields. Please note, unfortunately spaces are limited so completion of form does not guarantee a place, but we will do our best to accommodate as many people as possible.

#OpenDataEDB 2: 16th May

- May 8, 2012 in event, Events, JISC OpenBib, jiscopenbib2, News, OKFN Openbiblio, wp4

Following the fun we had at March’s Meet-up ‘launch’, we will be having another gathering of people interested in open data next Wednesday 16th May. Hosted by the Wash Bar, Edinburgh, from 19.00, come and join us to discuss ideas, projects and plans in relation to openness. Lightning Talks will include Federico Sangati on crowdsourcing and education, ahead of his presentation at Dev8ed later this month, and a sneak preview of the hackathon that Open Biblio will be running 12-14th June in collaboration with OKFN’s Open GLAM and Cultural Heritage Working Group and DevCSI. If you would like to give a lightning talk (informal 2-3 minute presentations) about anything related to open data or knowledge, contact naomi.lillie [@] okfn.org. Sign up here and we’ll see you there!

Sticker Design 1

For this and other events in Edinburgh and the rest of Scotland, sign up here.

Community discussions 2

- April 24, 2012 in event, JISC OpenBib, jiscopenbib2, lod-lam, News, OKFN Openbiblio, wp3, wp4, wp5

It’s been a funny few weeks, with Easter meaning that various people have been out-and-about at various times, but as always, the community never rests… Following on from Community Discussions (1), here are the latest goings-on to raise your interest and maybe your eyebrows:
  • Mark MacGillivray reported on the 29th March that the project is working with Total Impact to link their services to an instance of Bibserver

  • Multilingual matters in BibJSON arose again and, once more, JSON-LD was given backing as being useful for our purposes

  • Adrian Pohl discussed Nature’s release of 450,000 articles under a CC0 licence and followed up with this more in-depth article

  • Todd Robbins circulated Jim Pitman’s detailed article on author identity, which explores the issue of citations in relation to a non-existent publication (!) and includes recommendations for opening your own data

  • Antoine Isaac notified us of Europeana’s ‘Connecting Society to Culture Programme’, as part of the Hack4Europe! 2012 road show, including 3 hackathons in 3 different countries; it turns out that one in Berlin starts on the day our own Hackathon finishes – speaking of which…

  • Hackathon ‘show of hands’ request sent out! Contact naomi.lillie [@] okfn.org if you’d like to add your name to the list of interested people. This Hackathon is being run by Open Biblio with Open GLAM and DevCSI, on the 12th-14th June, in East London – more details to follow

  • Following the last Working Group meeting, Adrian Pohl expounded upon the role and goals of the Working Group, which is now given at http://openbiblio.net/about and http://openbiblio.net/get-involved

  • David Weinberger announced that Harvard has opened 12 million bibliographic records to the public domain under a CC0 licence – see his blog post to read more about it and for links to further information

  • Finally, Adrian announced the next Working Group meeting on 7th May, where Mark MacGillivray will be updating the community on project developments

As always, thanks to our amazing community for promoting and leading open bibliographic data in all its manifestations. To become part of the group and get your voice heard, sign up to the List here.

Community discussions

- March 27, 2012 in JISC OpenBib, jiscopenbib2, News, OKFN Openbiblio, wp3, wp4, wp5

The Open Biblio core team are a small bunch, but there’s a wealth of people out there providing information and suggestions to make our work better and more widely known. The List is a key way for people to post ideas, so here’s a round-up of some posts made over the last couple of weeks as food for thought: Sebastian Nordhoff updated us on his efforts towards bibliographical data for the world’s lesser known languages, Langdoc. This brought into sharp relief the ever-pressing issues surrounding publishing licences, as the collections here are CC-BY-NC. Sebastian supports the Open Biblio principles, which explain data should be released as CC-0, but explained that some data has sensitive issues associated with the languages involved. Sebastian followed the discussion with this post which explains the release in more detail. The complex issue of orphan data was raised by Karen Coyle. An organisation that hosts – but did not create – bibliographic data she wished to use declined to release the data under PDDL / CC0, because there is no specified ‘owner’ of the bibliographic records and they do not consider themselves to have rights to grant any license. Suggested solutions included claiming ownership to allow any original owner to come forward, or using http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/nesson/digital-registry or other facilities to store and release the data. Mark MacGillivray cautioned that finding work-arounds, “…Promote[s] the idea that things found… on the internet with no claims attached to them are not freely available. Promoting such a default stance would do nothing except promote the interests of people who want to own everything”, which somewhat goes against the idea that things should be open by default; Adrian Pohl agreed, citing Public Domain Mark 1.0 as a way of declaring, ‘This already is public domain because no one has rights over this data and thus no one can license it’. The ever pragmatic Peter Murray-Rust declared, “The risk [of being sued] is less than being hit by an asteroid. Go ahead”. The issue of ‘owner-less’ data rumbles on and Karen made the pertinent point that, “As more and more data (and metadata) comes onto the web we will have more of these situations” and that there should be a way for the holder of a piece of information to declare he/she claims no rights, not even physical ownership rights, over the data once leaves his/her database. Mark circulated the news that Research Councils UK is considering changing its open access policies, to mandate that all RCUK-funded papers be made freely available six months after publication. Although the draft says that research council funding may be used to support payment of authors’ fees in open access publishing, it does not go as far as the Wellcome Trust’s policy which extends to paying to publish even when a grant is used up… But it’s certainly a step in the right direction. Roderic Page pondered the difficulty of differing languages within the same article (as opposed to a translation of the article, which is a different record), which goes back to the crux of simplicity vs complexity as explored by the dev team and discussed here.


All this and more is available on the List here where you can sign up to be part of the discussions as well as peruse the archives.