Music in the Margins: The Funeral of Reynard the Fox (13th century)

Adam Green - July 13, 2017 in animals, folklore, fox, manuscripts, medieval, middle ages, renard, reynard, reynard the fox

A motley crew of anthropomorphic animals found adorning the lower margins of a finely illuminated book of hours produced in late thirteenth-century England.

Music in the Margins: The Funeral of Reynard the Fox (13th century)

Adam Green - July 13, 2017 in animals, folklore, fox, manuscripts, medieval, middle ages, renard, reynard, reynard the fox

A motley crew of anthropomorphic animals found adorning the lower margins of a finely illuminated book of hours produced in late thirteenth-century England.

FutureTDM symposium: sharing project findings, policy guidelines and practitioner recommendations

FutureTDM - July 13, 2017 in FutureTDM

The FutureTDM project, in which Open Knowledge International participates, actively engages with stakeholders in the EU such as researchers, developers, publishers and SMEs to help improve the uptake of text and data mining (TDM) in Europe (read more). Last month, we held our FutureTDM Symposium at the International Data Science Conference 2017 in Salzburg, Austria. With the project drawing to a close, we shared the project findings and our first expert driven policy recommendations and practitioner guidelines. This blog report has been adapted from the original version on the FutureTDM blog. The FutureTDM track at the International Data Science Conference 2017 started with a speech by Bernhard Jäger form SYNYO who did a brief introduction to the project and explained the purpose of the Symposium – bringing together policy makers and stakeholder groups to share with them FutureTDM’s findings on how to increase TDM uptake. This was followed by a keynote speech on the Economic Potential of Data Analytics by Jan Strycharz from Fundacja Projekt Polska, a FutureTDM project partner. It was estimated that automated (big) data and analytics – if developed properly – will bring over 200 B Euro to the European GDP by 2020. This means that algorithms (not to say robots) will be, then, responsible for 1.9% of the European GDP. You can read more on the TDM impact on economy in our report Trend analysis, future applications and economics of TDM.

Dealing with the legal bumps

The plenary session with keynote speeches was followed by the panel: Data Analytics and the Legal Landscape: Intellectual Property and Data Protection. As an introduction to this legal session Freyja van den Boom from Open Knowledge International presented our findings on the legal barriers to TDM uptake that mainly refer to type of content and applicable regime (IP or Data Protection). Having gathered evidence from the TDM community, FutureTDM has identified three types of barriers: uncertainty, fragmentation and restrictiveness and developed guidelines recommendation how to overcome them. We have summarised this in our awareness sheet Legal Barriers and Recommendations. This was followed by the statements from the panelists: Prodromos Tsiavos (Onassis Cultural Centre/ IP Advisor) stressed the fact that with the recent changes in the European framework, the law faces significant issues and balancing the industrial interest is becoming necessary. He added that in order to initiate the uptake of the industry, a different approach is certainly needed because the industry will continue with license arrangements. Duncan Campbell (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.) concentrated on Copyright and IP issues. How do we deal with all the knowledge created? How does the copyright rule has influence? He spoke about EU Commission Proposal and UK TDM exception – how to make an exception work? Marie Timmermann (Science Europe) also focused on the TDM exception and its positive and negative sides. From the positive perspective, she views the fact that TDM exception moved from being optional to mandatory and it is not overridable. From the negative side she stated that the exception is very limited in scope. Startups or SMEs do not fall under this exception. Thus, Europe risks to lose promising researchers to other parts of the world. This statement was also supported by Romy Sigl (AustrianStartups). She confirmed that anybody can created a startup today, but if startups are not supported by legislation, they move outwards to another country where more potential is foreseen.

The right to read is to right to mine

The next panel was devoted to an overview of FutureTDM case studies: Startups to Multinationals. Freyja van den Boom (OKI) gave on overview of the highlights of the stakeholder consultations, which cover different areas and stakeholder groups within TDM domain. Peter Murray-Rust (ContentMine) presented a researcher’s view and he stressed that the right to read is to right to mine, but we have no legal certainty what a researcher is allowed to do and what not. Petr Knoth from CORE added that he believed that we needed the data infrastructure to support TDM. Data scientist are very busy with cleaning the data and they have little time to do the real mining. He added that the infrastructure should not be operated by the publishers but they should provide support. Donat Agosti from PLAZI focused on how you can make the data accessible so that everybody can use it. He mentioned the case of PLAZI repository – TreatmentBank. It is open and extracts each article and creates citable data. Once you have the data you can disseminate it. Kim Nilsson from PIVIGO spoke about the support for academics – they have already worked with 70 companies and provided support in TDM for 400 PhD academics. She mentioned how important data analytics and the possibility to see all the connections and correlations are for example for the medical sector. She stressed that data analytics is also extremely important for startups – gaining the access is critical for them.

Data science is the new IT

The next panel was devoted to Universities, TDM and the need for strategic thinking on educating researchers. FutureTDM project officer Kiera McNeice (British Library) gave an overview on the skills and education barriers to TDM. She stressed that there are many people saying that they need to have quite a lot of knowledge to use TDM and that there are skills gap between academia and industry. Also, the barriers to enter are still high because use of the TDM tools often require programming knowledge. We have put together a series of guidelines to help stakeholders overcome the barriers we have identified. Our policy guidelines include encouraging universities to support TDM through both their research and education arm for example by helping university senior management understand the needs of researchers around TDM, and potential benefits of supporting it. You can read more in our Baseline report of policies and barriers of TDM in Europe, or walk through them via our Knowledge Base. Kim Nilsson from PIVIGO stressed that the main challenge are software skills. The fact is that if you can do TDM you have fantastic options: startups, healthcare, charity. Their task is to offer proper career advice, help people understand what kind of skills are appreciated and assist them to build on them. Claire Sewell (Cambridge University Library) elaborated on the skills from the perspective of an academic librarian. What important is the basic understanding on copyright law, keeping up with technical skills and data skills. “We want to make sure that if a researcher comes into the library we are able to help him.”- she concluded. Jonas Holm from Stockholm University Library highlighted the fact that very little strategical thinking is going on in TDM area. “We have struggled to find much strategical thinking on TDM area. Who is strategically looking for improving the uptake at the universities? We couldn’t find much around Europe” – he said. Stefan Kasberger (ContentMine) stressed that the social part of the education is also important – meaning inclusion and diversity.

Infrastructure for Technology Implementation

The last session was dedicated to technologies and infrastructures supporting Text and Data Analytics: challenges and solutions. FutureTDM Project Officer Maria Eskevich (Radboud University) delivered a presentation on the TDM landscape with respect to infrastructure for technical implementation. Stelios Piperidis from OpenMinTed stressed the need for an infrastructure. “Following more on what we have discussed, it looks that TDM infrastructure has to respond to 3 key questions: How can I get hold on the data that I need? How can I find the tool to mine the data? How can I deploy the work carried out?” Mihai Lupu form Data market Austria brought up the issue of data formats: For example, there is a lot of data in csv files that people don’t know how to deal with. Maria Gavrilidou (clarin:el) highlighted the fact that not only the formats are problem but also identifying the source of data and putting in place lawful procedures with respect to this data. Meta data is also problematic because it very often does not exist. Nelson Silva (know-centre) focused on using proper tools for mining the data. Very often there is no particular tool that meets your needs and you have to either develop one or search for open source tools. Another challenge is the quality of the data. How much can you rely on the data and how to visualise it? And finally, how to be sure that the people will have the right message.

Roadmap

The closing session was conducted by Kiera McNeice (British Library), who presented A Roadmap to promoting greater uptake of Data Analytics in Europe.  Finally, we also had a Demo Session with flash presentations by:
  • Stefan Kasberger (ContentMine),
  • Donat Agosti (PLAZI), Petr Knoth (CORE),
  • John Thompson-Ralf Klinkenberg (Rapidminer),
  • Maria Gavrilidou (clarin:el),
  • Alessio Palmero Aprosio (ALCIDE)
You can find all FutureTDM reports in our Knowledge Library, or visit our Knowledge Base: a structured collection of resources on Text and Data Mining (TDM) that has been gathered throughout the FutureTDM project.  

Beliebtes Vornamen-Tool des Bundes jetzt auf vornamen.opendata.ch

murielstaub - July 13, 2017 in Allgemein, Daten, National

Auf Initiative der Privatwirtschaft wurde das beliebteste Web-Tool des Bundesamts für Statistik neu programmiert und kann seit heute unter der Adresse https://vornamen.opendata.ch wieder genutzt werden. Die interaktive Datenbank ermöglicht Abfragen zur Häufigkeit von Vornamen in der Wohnbevölkerung der Schweiz. Das Bundesamt für Statistik (BFS) hat die Vornamen seit 1902 nicht nur gesammelt, sondern auch in einem interaktiven Tool der Bevölkerung zur Verfügung gestellt. Die beliebte Vornamen-Suche ist aber aus Spargründen und wegen eines neuen Webauftritts des BFS nicht mehr verfügbar. Auf der Website des BFS heisst es seither: “Das BFS hat seinen Webauftritt modernisiert. In der neuen technischen Umgebung steht das Vornamen-Tool nicht mehr zur Verfügung.” Interessierte können die Rohdaten nach wie vor in Tabellenform herunterladen und einsehen. Die Daten sind aber so nicht für jedermann einfach zugänglich und einsehbar. Die Firma snowflake productions gmbh hat sich daher entschlossen, die interaktive Datenbank «Vornamen in der Schweiz» wieder ins Leben zu rufen. Als Datenquelle dient die vom BFS zur Verfügung gestellte Statistik der Bevölkerung und Haushalte (STATPOP 2015). Angezeigt werden von der Suchmaschine sämtliche Vornamen, die mindestens drei Mal vorkommen. So kann in der Datenbank die Häufigkeit von 56’890 Vornamen mit Wohnsitz in der Schweiz verglichen werden. Mit dem interaktiven Tool lässt sich die Hitparade der beliebtesten Vornamen der Neugeborenen auch nach Kantonen und einzelnen Sprachregionen aufschlüsseln. Dass ein so stark frequentiertes Tool des Bundes mit dem Relaunch der Website plötzlich nicht mehr zur Verfügung steht, kann Adrian Zimmermann, CEO der snowflake productions gmbh nicht nachvollziehen. “Das Vornamen-Tool des BFS war über alle Massen beliebt. Ich habe es selber für die Namenswahl meines Sohnes benutzt. Viele Bekannte haben als werdende Eltern intensiv mit dem Tool Namensrecherche betrieben.” Als klar wurde, dass der neue Webauftritt des BFS kein Budget mehr für die Neuprogrammierung des Tools zulässt, war der Entschluss schnell gefällt. “Ersatz muss her – und wenn das der Bund nicht macht, nehmen wir das in die Hand!”, so Adrian Zimmermann. Die aktuelle interaktive Datenbank ist komplett neu programmiert und wird in den nächsten Wochen und Monaten auch laufend ausgebaut werden. Die Umsetzung des neuen Vornamen-Tools ist so konzipiert, dass dieses sogar in den bestehenden Webauftritt des BFS nahtlos integriert werden könnte. Performance: aus der Historie gelernt Im Jahr 2013 brachen die Server beim Bundesamt für Statistik schon kurz nach der Aufschaltung des Vornamen-Tools zusammen. Aufgrund der «sehr grossen Nachfrage» sei die Applikation «momentan» nicht verfügbar, teilte das BFS auf seiner Website im April 2013 mit. Tausende hatten offenbar gleichzeitig online nach der landesweiten Verbreitung ihres Vornamens gesucht. Dafür, dass dies bei der neuen interaktiven Datenbank nicht wieder passiert, ist gesorgt. “Wir haben bei der Umsetzung auf leichtgewichtige Technologien gesetzt um auch bei grossen Zugriffsspitzen die Daten performant ausliefern zu können.”, so der Applikationsentwickler Simone Cogno. Für solche Anwendungen bietet sich das auch hier eingesetzte Node.js an. Node.js ist eine Software-Plattform mit eventbasierter Architektur. Verwendung findet Node.js in der Entwicklung serverseitiger JavaScript-Anwendungen, die grosse Datenmengen in Echtzeit bewältigen müssen. Open Data: für alle nutzbar Seit heute kann das Vornamen-Tool unter der Adresse https://vornamen.opendata.ch wieder genutzt werden. Adrian Zimmermann: “Wir setzen seit über 17 Jahren stark auf Open Source und unterstützen daher tatkräftig offene Standards und Open Source Software fachlich, organisatorisch und auf politischer Ebene.” Mit der Neuauflage des Vornamen-Tools möchte snowflake ihren Teil zu Transparenz, Innovation und Effizienz beitragen. Responsive: auch auf mobilen Geräten nutzbar Damit zukünftig auch auf mobilen Geräten dieser “Beschäftigung” nachgegangen werden kann, wurde gleich zu Beginn der Neurealisation auf ein Responsive Ansatz der Applikation gesetzt. “Mit Twitter Bootstrap und AngularJ S sorgen wir dafür, dass die Applikation auch auf Smartphones und Tablets gut nutzbar ist”, führt Nicolas Karrer (Applikationsentwickler) aus. Noch gibt es Potential zur Verbesserung, vor allem für die Darstellung auf Smartphones. Diese Optimierungen werden im Laufe der nächsten Wochen laufend vorgenommen werden. Zukunft Die Entwicklung des interaktiven Tools macht allen Beteiligten grossen Spass. In den letzten Jahren hat snowflake viele komplexe und herausfordernde Web-Applikationen für Kunden entwickelt. Doch bei wenigen war der spielerische und explorative Aspekt so ausgeprägt. Die interaktive Datenbank «Vornamen in der Schweiz» birgt noch viel Potential für “Daten-Spielereien”. Dementsprechend wird snowflake das Vornamen-Tool auch laufend weiter entwickeln und sobald verfügbar auch mit neuen Daten des BFS aktualisieren.

Wir müssen in die Zivilgesellschaft investieren

Christian Heise, Andreas Pawelke, Arne Semsrott - July 13, 2017 in Uncategorized

Hoffnung allein reicht nicht. Angesichts von Trump, Brexit und Orbán, angesichts der großen Stimmengewinne von rechtsextremen Parteien bei Wahlen in Frankreich, Österreich und den Niederlande sind die demokratischen Kräfte in Europa gefordert, die Demokratie attraktiver zu machen. Ein Teil dieser Aufgabe liegt in der Stärkung von Transparenz und Kontrolle demokratischer Prozesse und Entscheidungen. Mit vielen unserer Projekte arbeiten wir daran, den Staat transparenter und öffentliche Daten fürs Gemeinwohl nutzbar zu machen. Wir wollen Teilhabe, Gerechtigkeit und Selbstermächtigung der Zivilgesellschaft voranbringen. Zum Beispiel arbeiten derzeit in den Wahlsalons Menschen aus unserer Community an der Aufbereitung von Daten zur Bundestagswahl und beim Storyhunt geht es darum, Ausgaben der Europäischen Union nachzuverfolgen. Dafür brauchen wir aber vor allem zwei Dinge: starke gesetzliche Grundlagen und eine langfristige Finanzierung der Zivilgesellschaft. Wichtige Prozesse mit potentiell langfristigen und tiefgreifenden Auswirkungen auf demokratische Teilhabe und Transparenz wurden in den vergangenen Wochen abgeschlossen oder auf den Weg gebracht. Das Transparenzregister für wirtschaftliche Eigentümer, das Open-Data-Gesetz, der erste Nationale Aktionsplan für die Open Government Partnership und deutsche Selbstverpflichtungen im Rahmen der Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI).

Gemeinwohl statt Einzelinteressen

Einige davon nutzen allerdings wirtschaftlichen Einzelinteressen eher als der breiten Bevölkerung. Finanz- und Justizministerium etwa haben sich dem Druck von Unternehmenslobbyisten gebeugt und bestimmt, dass die Daten von wirtschaftlichen Eigentümern, also unter anderem von Hinterleuten von Briefkastenfirmen, nicht öffentlich zugänglich sein werden. Trotz Panama Papers und obwohl die Scheinargumente der Lobbyisten als haltlos entlarvt wurden, versperrt sich die deutsche Politik mehr Transparenz in der Finanzpolitik. Und auch das Open-Data-Gesetz ist hinter seinen Erwartungen zurückgeblieben. Obwohl es im parlamentarischen Prozess noch verbessert wurde, liegt der Fokus des Gesetzes eindeutig auf dem wirtschaftlichen Nutzen offener Daten - Transparenz und Korruptionsbekämpfung bleiben auf der Strecke. Damit der Prozess um die Open Government Partnership nicht ähnlich enttäuschend verläuft, muss die Regierung sich darauf verständigen, dass eine Stärkung der Demokratie nicht ohne offene Regierungsführung zu machen ist. Wie der Open-Data-Report der Initiative und eine Studie der Web Foundation zeigt, müssen vor allem Daten zu Gesetzgebungsverfahren (und auch Lobbyismus) offengelegt werden und ein besonderer Fokus auf politisch und sozial wichtige Daten gelegt werden. Wichtigstes Vorhaben muss es dabei bleiben, das veraltete und schwache Informationsfreiheitsgesetz (IFG) zu stärken und zu einem Transparenzgesetz weiterzuentwickeln.

Ressourcen stärken für die Zivilgesellschaft

Investitionen in die Wirtschaft gibt es überall - wir brauchen Investitionen in die Zivilgesellschaft. Bisher ist diese gekennzeichnet durch mangelnde Ressourcen für die politische Arbeit und für Herausforderungen bei der kritischen Durchleuchtung der Treiber und Profiteure des Wandels der Gesellschaft. Es fehlt vielerorts an professioneller Koordination, es gibt einen Ressourcenmangel bei der Sicherstellung der Nachhaltigkeit von zivilgesellschaftlichen Engagement, sowie Talentschwund und brachliegende Projektideen. Vor allem mit den neueren Aspekten der Digitalisierung tun sich Vereine, Stiftungen und Initiativen besonders schwer, nachhaltig Mittel zu akquirieren. Dies hat fatale Folgen für unser Land, denn nur eine aktive Zivilgesellschaft kann der Politik als fähiger Partner in einer funktionierenden Demokratie zur Seite stehen, gesellschaftlich nicht wünschenswerte Tendenzen kontrastieren und Gegengewicht für kurzfristige kommerzielle Agenden sein. Die Zivilgesellschaft ist wesentlicher Bestandteil bei den Aushandlungsprozessen für die Gestaltung der Welt in der wir leben wollen. Sie ist meist getrieben von demokratischen Idealen und langfristigen Vorstellungen, während viele Politiker und Konzerne in der Regel kurzsichtig oder legislaturbezogen agieren und die gesamtgesellschaftlichen Interessen nicht in dem gebotenen Maß berücksichtigen. Wenn wir in die Zivilgesellschaft investieren, werden die Gegner der Demokratie zwar nicht automatisch geschwächt werden. Die Befürworter der Demokratie werden aber gestärkt.

Öffentliche Ankündigung: Das Open-Data-Gesetz ist in Kraft

walter palmetshofer - July 13, 2017 in Uncategorized



Gut Ding will Weile haben. Nachdem es im Mai im Bundestag beschlossen wurde und im Juni durch den Bundesrat ging, wurde das Open-Data-Gesetz gestern endlich im Bundesgesetzblatt verkündet. Das Gesetz firmiert offiziell unter dem Titel Erstes Gesetz zur Änderung des E-Government-Gesetzes. Eine kurze inhaltliche Zusammenfassung findet sich hier. Nochmals vielen Dank an alle Beteiligten!

Öffentliche Ankündigung: Das Open-Data-Gesetz ist in Kraft

walter palmetshofer - July 13, 2017 in Uncategorized



Gut Ding will Weile haben. Nachdem es im Mai im Bundestag beschlossen wurde und im Juni durch den Bundesrat ging, wurde das Open-Data-Gesetz gestern endlich im Bundesgesetzblatt verkündet. Das Gesetz firmiert offiziell unter dem Titel Erstes Gesetz zur Änderung des E-Government-Gesetzes. Eine kurze inhaltliche Zusammenfassung findet sich hier. Nochmals vielen Dank an alle Beteiligten!

Inventing the Recording

Adam Green - July 12, 2017 in early recording, edison, Florencio Constantino, gabinetes fonográficos, Music, music of spain, phonography, recording

Eva Moreda Rodríguez on the formative years of the recording, focusing on the culture surrounding the gabinetes fonográficos of fin-de-siècle Spain.

Inventing the Recording

Adam Green - July 12, 2017 in early recording, edison, Florencio Constantino, gabinetes fonográficos, Music, music of spain, phonography, recording

Eva Moreda Rodríguez on the formative years of the recording, focusing on the culture surrounding the gabinetes fonográficos of fin-de-siècle Spain.

Data is a Team Sport: Advocacy Organisations

Dirk Slater - July 11, 2017 in Amnesty International, Data Blog, data literacy, Event report, Fabriders, global witness, research, Team Sport

Data is a Team Sport is our open-research project exploring the data literacy eco-system and how it is evolving in the wake of post-fact, fake news and data-driven confusion.  We are producing a series of videos, blog posts and podcasts based on a series of online conversations we are having with data literacy practitioners. To subscribe to the podcast series, cut and paste the following link into your podcast manager : http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:311573348/sounds.rss or find us in the iTunes Store and Stitcher. In this episode we discussed data driven advocacy organisations with:
  • Milena Marin is Senior Innovation Campaigner at Amnesty International. She is currently leads Amnesty Decoders – an innovative project aiming to engage digital volunteers in documenting human right violations using new technologies. Previously she worked as programme manager of School of Data. She also worked for over 4 years with Transparency International where she supported TI’s global network to use technology in the fight against corruption.
  • Sam Leon, is Data Lead at Global Witness, focusing on the use of data to fight corruption and how to turn this information into change making stories. He is currently working with a coalition of data scientists, academics and investigative journalists to build analytical models and tools that enable anti-corruption campaigners to understand and identify corporate networks used for nefarious and corrupt practices.

Notes from the Conversation

In order to get their organisations to see the value and benefit of using data, they both have had to demonstrate results and have looked for opportunities where they could show effective impact. What data does for advocacy is to show the extent of the problem and it provides depths to qualitative and individual stories.  Milena credits the work of School of Data for the fact that journalists now expect their to be data accessible from Amnesty to back up their data.
  • They see gaps in the way that people working in advocacy see data and new technologies as bright shiny and easy answers to their challenges.
  • In today’s post-fact world, they find that it’s being used to more quickly discredit their work and as a result they need to work harder at presenting verifiable data.
  • Amnesty’s decoder project has involved 45,000 volunteers and along with being able to review a huge amount of video, they have also gotten training and a deeper understanding of what Amnesty does.
  • Global Witness has had a limited amount of data-sets they have released to the public and would like to be releasing more data that can be of use to communities. However there is a long way to go before their data can be open by default as there needs to be further learning and understanding of how data can make individuals more vulnerable.
  • Advocacy organisations need to use intermediaries and externals to cover the gaps in their own expertise around data.

More about their work

Milena

Sam

Dirk

Resources and Readings

View the Full Conversation:

  Flattr this!