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Open Knowledge Sweden partners up to support DiploHack Stockholm 2016!

Mattias Axell - May 13, 2016 in 2030 Agenda, Bert Koenders, Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, eu, hackathon, Impact Hub Stockholm, SDG, Sustainable Development Goals, Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, TransparencyCamp Europe, Utrikesdepartementet

DiploHack Stockholm 2016Diplohack Stockholm 2016:

Sustainable development of a Smart Government

– a gathering of diplomats, devs and designers to make EU Open Data a citizens’ friend

Impact Hub Stockholm and The Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Stockholm joins forces with the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, supported by Open Knowledge Sweden to organize Diplohack Stockholm, a diplomatic hackathon that brings sustainable change and transparency into the EU social and government sector using open data and Freedom of Information requests. After an ideation workshop (Tuesday – May, 10th), where pressing issues are identified, developers, designers, socialpreneurs, diplomats and active members of society will spend 54 hours without interruption, building a better and more sustainable digital future. They will develop new ideas, products and services that solve imminent concerns and bottlenecks, and lead to a transparent, accessible and connected decision making. Last year, the UN adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which includes a set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end poverty, fight inequality and injustice, and tackle climate change by 2030. These SDGs will serve as a guideline and a reference point for the creators at Diplohack Stockholm, to ensure a unified strive towards feasible solutions. Diplohack Stockholm is part of a series of hackathons organized all over Europe in the context of the Netherlands’ EU Presidency during the first semester of 2016, in response to a call by Dutch foreign minister Bert Koenders. He had challenged EU citizens to “shine light in the black box of Brussels”. The winners in the local events will participate in TransparencyCamp Europe that takes place this year on June 1st in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. This unconference will focus on open data, new technologies and policies that make the EU work for people, stimulate open government and help grasp the workings of the various EU institutions with open data and Freedom of Information requests. Open data leads to better value, fewer risks, and more stakeholders. In the face of a rapidly-changing Europe, participatory and co-creative processes can unlock the potential of the citizenry on a path toward a more abundant, inclusive, and sustainable future. May 10th, Tuesday (18.00 – 20.00) – Ideation workshop Gathering creative minds, experts and government officials to brainstorm over the most pressing, current issues and drawing up a “hack protocol” guide. May 13th, Friday (18.00 – 22.30) – Meet&Greet, Pitches, Team formation – Introducing the participants to each other and the concept. Hearing and evaluating viable product pitches. Forming teams around the most feasible ideas. May 14th-15th – Sleepless and inspired product building. May 15th (18.00 – 20.00) – Final presentations, evaluation by the jury and selection of winners and prize recipients. May 15th (20.00-TBA) – Mingle, aftermath and reflection. June 1st – TransparencyCamp Europe in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Core Goals

  • Create new, collaborative and creative methods for diplomacy
  • Familiarize the civil society and tech industry with diplomats and diplomacy through co-creation.
  • Familiarize diplomats not just with social entrepreneurship, social media and open/big data, but with the tech industry and their start-up culture and practices
  • Actively look for added value in technology, social media and open/big data for diplomacy/public diplomacy
  • Recognize the role of networks and social media and open/big data as central to modern human interaction, including in international relations and especially in public diplomacy.
  • Do all of the above in a sustainable manner.

#Diplohack

The world is changing and diplomacy has to keep up. Networks and collaborations are becoming increasingly important. #Diplohack combines the specific know-how and skill sets of diplomats, social entrepreneurs, tech developers and designers, along with that of journalists, academics, NGOs and businesses to ‘hack’ traditional diplomatic problems in start-up style groups. It all begins with IDEATION in a WORKSHOP: We gather key actors in a room and listen to the challenges they face. Through the magic of Imagineering, the most compelling (and solvable) issues are described, aligned and engraved into the “hack protocol”. This will serve as a gentle guide to hint the “hackers” of what is in dire need of resolution. A few days down the road, the DIPLOHACK itself begins: On a lovely Friday evening, a presentation takes place, a few key figures say a few key words and we begin with laughs and icebreakers, culminating into a warm-up, 15-minute hackathon. Once the crowd gets a feel of what is there to come, Pitch Street opens up. To encourage all to pitch is a goal of great importance. 50 people, 60 seconds and a microphone is all you have, to convince us your idea rocks. Once the pitchers come to end, we put their “babies” on a wall and every “hacker” gets 3 votes to cast for a “baby” they would raise. A thousand options. Only 10 get chosen. Now recruitment starts. 10 idea owners look to build a team passionate, diverse and strong. The search is tough but often fruitful. 30 longest minutes later, teams are gathered, placed and work begins. After 54 dense hours of ups, downs, sweat and brain ache, on the eve of Sunday, the Lion Cage cracks open. 5 short and painful minutes is what you have, to teamfully present your labor’s fruit and face 5 Lions, trained expertly to pick apart your pitch in seconds. 5 more minutes Q&A and you’ve concluded. Lions listen with a hungry patience, take a note or two, and once all teams are good and done a council is formed – decisions made, winners chosen, feedback given and poof!

Beer, tears, chit-chat and reflection is how all ends.

ImpactHub Stockholm’s invitation is found here.

DiploHack Stockholm 2016

Embassy_of_the_Kingdom_of_the_Netherlands ImpactHub Stockholm

Ministry for Foreign Affairs - Government Offices of Sweden

EU2016

Diplohack Datad(r)ive Webinar summary

Anastasia Valeeva - April 19, 2016 in Featured, hackathon, Open Data

This is the Diplohack Datad(r)ive Webinar Blogpost. About all that you saw (or didn’t) and more.   Diplohack Datad(r)ive Webinar from Open Knowledge Belgium on Vimeo. First and foremost, the webinar was recorded and is available in full on our vimeo. Check the description of the video to jump to the part that you want to see specifically! We follow up with a Summary and some links you shouldn’t miss: Public Procurement Data. Tenders Electronic Database. Public procurement is the procedure through which public authorities using public money, purchase works, services or supplies from the private sector. This is how around 14% of GDP of the EU is spent. TED – Tenders Electronic Daily – is an online version of the ‘Supplement to the Official Journal’ of the EU. It covers notices from the European Economic Area, Switzerland and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia for the procurements above threshold: 5,2 m € for works and 135 k € for services and supplies, with some exceptions. This amounts to about 1700 notices each day. Even though below-threshold notices are not obligatory, but many contracting authorities also choose to do so to ensure visibility and transparency of their procurement. The main problem of this data is that it is provided ‘as is’, therefore sometimes with mistakes as given by contracting authorities. Current steps are being taken to clean it up (and if you want to clean up a lot for your project – contact TED ! The data comes from public procurement standard forms, based on EC regulations filled in the forms. The data is provided in CSV format . There are three levels: Contract Award Notices (CAN ) = best level of detalization, Contract Awards (CA) within a CAN, and Contract Notices (CN) for the future. This might be interesting to check for hackers: Who is buying? What are they buying? Who responds and participates? Who is awarded the contract in the end? Which procedure is used, which award criteria? What is the value of the contract? To describe the ‘what’, special CPV classification is used. And if you want to get involved, the European Commission is interested in the results of research in public procurement. Any output based on the data (papers, reports, links to applications) is very appreciated. More information can be found on TED Wiki which is an open wiki hosted by the Commission to support the exchange of ideas, especially between practitioners and academics.
Open Data of the Council of the EU Council together with the European Parliament is the co-legislator in the EU decision-making process. One if the core functions of the Council is to approve or reject any law that is being adopted at the EU level. The Council’s votes are available in open data format at the dedicated page, as well at the EU Open Data Portal. Speaking about the transparency of the work of the EU institutions and making the EU decision making process more available, there are two new datasets which have been published on the 14 of April 2016: metadata of the Council’s public register and metadata of the database on requests for public access to documents (with the exclusion of the personal data of the applicants). How can you access this data? You achieve this via SPARQL queries. The sample SPARQL queries and code for demo app are available on Github repository of the Council of the EU.
EU Open Data Portal European Union Open Data Portal – single point of access to the data from EU Institutions. There are 59 data providers to the portal: European Commission, Council of the EU, European Parliament, Directorates (DGs) and the European agencies (including JRC, Eurobarometer, Eurostat, Erazmus data), plus extractions of the ’Official Journal’ in xml format). There are numerous ways to find the data: search on the website, discover by category, machine access: via SPARQL or CKAN API. Bear in mind that  only metadata is published: title, description and link to the data sources. And if you have any questions, contact the portal. Feel the difference – there is also European Data Portal which has data from European countries harvested from national data portals and geoportals. This portal is managed by DG Connect.
EU Structural and Investment Funds EU Structural and Investment Funds website has data on EU funding under shared management covering 5 main funds: European Regional Development Funds, European Social Funds, the Cohesion Funds, European Agricultural Funds for Rural Development and Maritime and Fishery Funds. You can filter through the data and create filtered views, and visualisations based on this, as well as opportunity to download the data in a range of formats. You can also combine EU data from different sources and find info on “operations” (beneficiaries of funding).
DG Sante DG Sante has data about food safety, safety of the food chain, animal safety and about health. There are numerous datasets available in two ways: on the dedicated page of DG SANTE and on the Open Data Portal.   For the links for the specific datasets consult the presentation. Questions on data sets can be sent to SANTE-SEMANTIC@ec.europa.eu
dessert And, as this was a lunchtime webinar, here comes the dessert – few more sources of knowledge and inspiration. Project Digiwhist  is a very useful tool to analyse public procurement; Most popular datasets of the EU: The voting dataset for the Council of the EU; For DG SANTE the most popular ones are about pesticides and active substances. For Publications Office, the most viewed dataset is the one from DGT Translation Memory, and the top list of the datasets is on the front page of the Portal. For the EU Structural and Investment Funds, it is the one about the spent funding from the previous funding period. And here are the examples of apps and use-cases based on the EU open data. Enjoy!  

Diplohack Datad(r)ive Webinar summary

Anastasia Valeeva - April 19, 2016 in Featured, hackathon, Open Data

This is the Diplohack Datad(r)ive Webinar Blogpost. About all that you saw (or didn’t) and more.   Diplohack Datad(r)ive Webinar from Open Knowledge Belgium on Vimeo. First and foremost, the webinar was recorded and is available in full on our vimeo. Check the description of the video to jump to the part that you want to see specifically! We follow up with a Summary and some links you shouldn’t miss: Public Procurement Data. Tenders Electronic Database. Public procurement is the procedure through which public authorities are using public money, purchase works, services or supplies from the private sector. This is how around 14% of GDP of the EU is spent. TED – Tenders Electronic Daily – is an online version of the ‘Supplement to the Official Journal’ of the EU. It covers notices from the European Economic Area, Switzerland and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia for the procurements above threshold: 5,2 m € for works and 135 k € for services and supplies, with some exceptions. This amounts to about 1700 notices each day. Even though below-threshold notices are not obligatory, but many contracting authorities also choose to do so to ensure visibility and transparency of their procurement. The main problem of this data is that it is provided ‘as is’, therefore sometimes with mistakes as given by contracting authorities. Current steps are being taken to clean it up (and if you want to clean up a lot for your project – contact TED ! The data comes from public procurement standard forms, based on EC regulations filled in the forms. The data is provided in CSV format . There are three levels: Contract Award Notices (CAN ) = best level of detalization, Contract Awards (CA) within a CAN, and Contract Notices (CN) for the future. This might be interesting to check for hackers: Who is buying? What are they buying? Who responds and participates? Who is awarded the contract in the end? Which procedure is used, which award criteria? What is the value of the contract? To describe the ‘what’, special CPV classification is used. And if you want to get involved, the European Commission is interested in the results of research in public procurement. Any output based on the data (papers, reports, links to applications) is very appreciated. More information can be found on TED Wiki which is an open wiki hosted by the Commission to support the exchange of ideas, especially between practitioners and academics. Have a look at the presentation, too.
Open Data of the Council of the EU Council together with the European Parliament is the co-legislator in the EU decision-making process. One if the core functions of the Council is to approve or reject any law that is being adopted at the EU level. The Council’s votes are available in open data format at the dedicated page, as well at the EU Open Data Portal. Speaking about the transparency of the work of the EU institutions and making the EU decision making process more available, there are two new datasets which have been published on the 14 of April 2016: metadata of the Council’s public register and metadata of the database on requests for public access to documents (with the exclusion of the personal data of the applicants). How can you access this data? You achieve this via SPARQL queries. The sample SPARQL queries and code for demo app are available on Github repository of the Council of the EU.
EU Open Data Portal European Union Open Data Portal – single point of access to the data from EU Institutions. There are 59 data providers to the portal: European Commission, Council of the EU, European Parliament, Directorates (DGs) and the European agencies (including JRC, Eurobarometer, Eurostat, Erazmus data), plus extractions of the ’Official Journal’ in xml format). There are numerous ways to find the data: search on the website, discover by category, machine access: via SPARQL or CKAN API. Bear in mind that  only metadata is published: title, description and link to the data sources. And if you have any questions, contact the portal. Feel the difference – there is also European Data Portal which has data from European countries harvested from national data portals and geoportals. This portal is managed by DG Connect.
EU Structural and Investment Funds EU Structural and Investment Funds website has data on EU funding under shared management covering 5 main funds: European Regional Development Funds, European Social Funds, the Cohesion Funds, European Agricultural Funds for Rural Development and Maritime and Fishery Funds. You can filter through the data and create filtered views, and visualisations based on this, as well as opportunity to download the data in a range of formats. You can also combine EU data from different sources and find info on “operations” (beneficiaries of funding).
DG Sante DG Sante has data about food safety, safety of the food chain, animal safety and about health. There are numerous datasets available in two ways: on the dedicated page of DG SANTE and on the Open Data Portal.   For the links for the specific datasets consult the presentation. Questions on data sets can be sent to SANTE-SEMANTIC@ec.europa.eu
dessert And, as this was a lunchtime webinar, here comes the dessert – few more sources of knowledge and inspiration. Project Digiwhist  is a very useful tool to analyse public procurement; Most popular datasets of the EU: The voting dataset for the Council of the EU; For DG SANTE the most popular ones are about pesticides and active substances. For Publications Office, the most viewed dataset is the one from DGT Translation Memory, and the top list of the datasets is on the front page of the Portal. For the EU Structural and Investment Funds, it is the one about the spent funding from the previous funding period. And here are the examples of apps and use-cases based on the EU open data. Enjoy!  

Diplohack Datad(r)ive Webinar summary

Anastasia Valeeva - April 19, 2016 in Featured, hackathon, Open Data

This is the Diplohack Datad(r)ive Webinar Blogpost. About all that you saw (or didn’t) and more.   Diplohack Datad(r)ive Webinar from Open Knowledge Belgium on Vimeo. First and foremost, the webinar was recorded and is available in full on our vimeo. Check the description of the video to jump to the part that you want to see specifically! We follow up with a Summary and some links you shouldn’t miss: Public Procurement Data. Tenders Electronic Database. Public procurement is the procedure through which public authorities are using public money, purchase works, services or supplies from the private sector. This is how around 14% of GDP of the EU is spent. TED – Tenders Electronic Daily – is an online version of the ‘Supplement to the Official Journal’ of the EU. It covers notices from the European Economic Area, Switzerland and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia for the procurements above threshold: 5,2 m € for works and 135 k € for services and supplies, with some exceptions. This amounts to about 1700 notices each day. Even though below-threshold notices are not obligatory, but many contracting authorities also choose to do so to ensure visibility and transparency of their procurement. The main problem of this data is that it is provided ‘as is’, therefore sometimes with mistakes as given by contracting authorities. Current steps are being taken to clean it up (and if you want to clean up a lot for your project – contact TED ! The data comes from public procurement standard forms, based on EC regulations filled in the forms. The data is provided in CSV format . There are three levels: Contract Award Notices (CAN ) = best level of detalization, Contract Awards (CA) within a CAN, and Contract Notices (CN) for the future. This might be interesting to check for hackers: Who is buying? What are they buying? Who responds and participates? Who is awarded the contract in the end? Which procedure is used, which award criteria? What is the value of the contract? To describe the ‘what’, special CPV classification is used. And if you want to get involved, the European Commission is interested in the results of research in public procurement. Any output based on the data (papers, reports, links to applications) is very appreciated. More information can be found on TED Wiki which is an open wiki hosted by the Commission to support the exchange of ideas, especially between practitioners and academics. Have a look at the presentation, too.
Open Data of the Council of the EU Council together with the European Parliament is the co-legislator in the EU decision-making process. One if the core functions of the Council is to approve or reject any law that is being adopted at the EU level. The Council’s votes are available in open data format at the dedicated page, as well at the EU Open Data Portal. Speaking about the transparency of the work of the EU institutions and making the EU decision making process more available, there are two new datasets which have been published on the 14 of April 2016: metadata of the Council’s public register and metadata of the database on requests for public access to documents (with the exclusion of the personal data of the applicants). How can you access this data? You achieve this via SPARQL queries. The sample SPARQL queries and code for demo app are available on Github repository of the Council of the EU.
EU Open Data Portal
European Union Open Data Portal – single point of access to the data from EU Institutions. There are 59 data providers to the portal: European Commission, Council of the EU, European Parliament, Directorates (DGs) and the European agencies (including JRC, Eurobarometer, Eurostat, Erazmus data), plus extractions of the ’Official Journal’ in xml format). There are numerous ways to find the data: search on the website, discover by category, machine access: via SPARQL or CKAN API. Bear in mind that  only metadata is published: title, description and link to the data sources. And if you have any questions, contact the portal. Feel the difference – there is also European Data Portal which has data from European countries harvested from national data portals and geoportals. This portal is managed by DG Connect.
EU Structural and Investment Funds EU Structural and Investment Funds website has data on EU funding under shared management covering 5 main funds: European Regional Development Funds, European Social Funds, the Cohesion Funds, European Agricultural Funds for Rural Development and Maritime and Fishery Funds. You can filter through the data and create filtered views, and visualisations based on this, as well as opportunity to download the data in a range of formats. You can also combine EU data from different sources and find info on “operations” (beneficiaries of funding).
DG Sante DG Sante has data about food safety, safety of the food chain, animal safety and about health. There are numerous datasets available in two ways: on the dedicated page of DG SANTE and on the Open Data Portal.   For the links for the specific datasets consult the presentation. Questions on data sets can be sent to SANTE-SEMANTIC@ec.europa.eu
dessert And, as this was a lunchtime webinar, here comes the dessert – few more sources of knowledge and inspiration. Project Digiwhist  is a very useful tool to analyse public procurement; Most popular datasets of the EU: The voting dataset for the Council of the EU;
For DG SANTE the most popular ones are about pesticides and active substances. For Publications Office, the most viewed dataset is the one from DGT Translation Memory, and the top list of the datasets is on the front page of the Portal. For the EU Structural and Investment Funds, it is the one about the spent funding from the previous funding period. And here are the examples of apps and use-cases based on the EU open data. Enjoy!